Cruze 1.4 Turbo - Bypass oil filter - Page 3
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Thread: Cruze 1.4 Turbo - Bypass oil filter

  1. #21
    1st Gear CRUISE-CRUZE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 70AARCUDA View Post
    ...
    03-Nov...___72 miles; EOL 97% = (not given)
    03-Dec...1,339 miles; EOL 87% = 12,400 miles estimated life remaining.
    13-Jan...2,018 miles; EOL 78% = 10,000 miles estimated life remaining.
    02-Feb...2,339 miles; EOL 73% = _8,900 miles estimated life remaining.


    ...it's not a certainty with only three data sets, but it looks like there's a linear relationship between the miles driven (MILES) and the miles of estimated life (EST) remaining:

    EST = 17089 - 3.5*MILES, with correlation coefficient RR = 0.9999

    ...anybody else tracking these numbers?
    This isn’t a 50K car so don’t expect the gauge to be “smart” and to check the oil composition, temperature, etc. This gauge should be related just with miles and time and nothing more……

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  3. #22
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    ...can't speak for others, but when a computer gives me a numerical projection, I want to know whether that number is linear or otherwise curved...meaning if On-Star™ says 10,000 miles today, should the next number be about 5,000 miles, or will it be much shorter because the relationship is non-linear (ie: log or exponental or power, etc.).

    ...in other words, is the "life" in Oil-Life-Monitor a linear projection or is it non-linear.
    Last edited by 70AARCUDA; 02-05-2011 at 10:23 PM.
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  4. #23
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    I would suggest that it is linear for a given set of input conditions. But I expect that it also dynamic in that it changes as driving conditions change. Then projects the expected remaining life based on the more recent sample sets.

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    GM Oil Life Monitor System Frequently Asked Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by 70AARCUDA View Post
    ...in other words, is the "life" in Oil-Life-Monitor a linear projection or is it non-linear.
    You tell me if linear or non-linear. My guess is "non-linear" from what I have read.

    I have attached the pdf that answers your question (I hope)



    GM Oil Life Monitor System Frequently Asked Questions

    How does the system work? The GM Oil Life Monitor System is not a mileage counter. It is actually a computer based software algorithm that determines when to change oil based on engine operating conditions. There is no actual oil condition sensor. Rather, the computer continuously monitors engine-operating conditions to determine when to change oil. Over the years, millions of test miles have been accumulated to calibrate the system for a variety of vehicles. The system was first introduced in 1988 and is now on more than 10 million GM vehicles.

    How do I operate the system? The GM Oil Life Monitor System is very easy to use. First, refer to the vehicle owner’s manual for a description of the specific ‘change oil’ message and the instructions for resetting the system. When the vehicle has been driven the appropriate miles, the ‘change oil’ message will be illuminated on the instrument panel or driver information center when the vehicle is first started. An oil change should be done within two fuel tank fillups from when the message was first displayed. Immediately after the oil has been changed, the system must be reset. After resetting, the ‘change oil’ display will no longer be displayed after engine start up. I change my oil every 3000 miles, so of what use is this system? You can continue to change your oil every 3000 miles if you so choose, but remember to reset the system after changing the oil or you will get a false “change oil” message. However the GM Oil Life Monitor System will allow you the ability to extend the mileage between changes without harming your engine. This will save you time and money as well as helping to protect the environment by minimizing the amount of used oil.

    Do I have to use special oil? The GM Oil Life Monitor System is calibrated for use with standard “Starburst” mineralbased automotive engine oil. Synthetic oils are not required except for the Corvette. Make sure to read the owner’s manual and select the viscosity and oil grade that is correct for your engine. Any oil selected for use should carry the ILSAC “Starburst”.

    How many miles can I expect to go between oil changes when using this system? The beauty of the GM Oil Life Monitor System is that it will automatically adjust the oil change interval based engine characteristics, driving habits and the climate in which the vehicle is operated. For instance, mild highway driving in a warm climate will maximize the interval between oil changes. Depending on the vehicle, this could be in excess of 7000 miles and as high as 12,000 miles. On the other hand, short trip driving in cold a climate may limit the oil change to 3000 miles or less. In general, most people that drive a combination of city and highway schedules find that the GM Oil Life Monitor System will indicate an oil change every 7500 to 8500 miles.

    What happens if I change oil and forget to reset the system? Since the GM Oil Life Monitor System does not actually sense oil condition, it is important that the engine computer knows when an oil change takes place. By enabling the reset (read owner’s manual for instructions), it lets the computer know an oil change has taken place. In the event that an oil change is done without resetting the system, the ‘change oil’ indicator will remain illuminated until the system is rest. The more miles that are driven without the system being reset, the more inaccurate the GM Oil Life Monitor System will be. If more than 500 miles have been driven after an oil change without resetting the GM Oil Life Monitor System, the oil change interval should be defaulted back to 3000 miles. After the oil has been changed and the system reset, normal use of the system can be resumed. The oil change service station recommends that I change oil every 3000 miles. Why should I not believe them? The 3000 mile oil change is very conservative approach to maintaining your vehicle that dates back to 1968. Many advancements in engine and oil technology have been made since then. These advancements, in conjunction with using the GM Oil Life Monitor System, allow engine oil drain intervals to be increased without risking harm your the engine.

    I change my own oil, should I reset the system myself? You can reset per the vehicle owner's manual, or ask your selling dealer.

    Will I damage the car if I don't get the oil changed soon after the light comes on? As stated in the owner's manual, change oil as soon as possible. It is recommended that oil be changed within 600 miles of the change oil light / message.

    Do I have to check my oil level now that my vehicle is equipped with the GM Oil Life Monitor System? Yes, the system does not sense oil level. As stated in the owner's manual, it is recommended that you check your oil every time you stop for gasoline.

    Will I void my warranty if I don't go by the GM Oil Life Monitor System? Complying with the owner's manual recommendations will maintain the warranty. I had my oil changed recently and now my GM Oil Life Monitor System light came on. If the system was not reset (refer to owner's manual) at the time of oil change, the system can be reset as long as it's been less than 500 miles since the last oil change. If this mileage has been exceeded, change the oil at 3000 miles and reset system. I prefer to have my oil changed still around 3,500 miles, what should I do? It is ok to change oil prior to being notified by the vehicle. Be sure the system is reset even if the GM Oil Life Monitor System light has not illuminated.

    My oil seems dirty, I have 6,000 miles and no light, do I have a problem?
    Discoloration will take place under normal conditions depending on driving conditions. Refer to the Owner’s Manual for further information Can any dealer other than my selling dealer perform Simplified Maintenance services? While we like to recommend the selling dealer, any GM Goodwrench dealership can perform the Maintenance I and Maintenance II service and reset the GM Oil Life System.

    I use synthetic oil, should I expect to get more miles before the trigger point with GMOLS? The GM Oil Life System is calculated based on the factory fill requirement. While some benefits may exist, the oil drain interval is not extended due to the use of synthetic oil.

    During Summer I drive my vehicle in a very hot climate, do I need to change oil more often? The beauty of the GM Oil Life System is that it calculates for severe climate use and determines the oil change interval just as it does for trailer towing as well as stop and go operation. There is no need to adjust the oil change based on climate, as well as vehicle use.

    I continue to get 3,000 mile follow-up mailers from my dealer, what should I do? Inform you servicing dealer that you prefer to go by the Maintenance I and Maintenance II driven by the GM Oil Life Monitor System so that they may adjust the way you receive follow-up mailings.

    I have another GM vehicle a 2002 model with the GM Oil Life Monitor System, can I use the Simplified Maintenance Schedule with it also? While it is equipped with the GM Oil Life Monitor System, Maintenance I and Maintenance II was not yet introduced. The proper recommendation would always be to follow the owner’s manual.
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  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by montgom626 View Post
    Since the GM Oil Life Monitor System does not actually sense oil condition, it is important that the engine computer knows when an oil change takes place.
    So, like I said, nothing sophisticate with this gauge! Miles and time are what it counts. The rest is market advertising….. If this was smart enough to adjust itself based of the “driving habits and the climate which the vehicle is operated” then would have another option giving the driver the possibility to set up the oil type, etc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CRUISE-CRUZE View Post
    If this was smart enough to adjust itself based of the “driving habits and the climate which the vehicle is operated” then would have another option giving the driver the possibility to set up the oil type, etc.
    I must disagree. Oils vary. The testing on OLM takes millions of miles. Having the oil type change would introduce too many variables.

  8. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by CRUISE-CRUZE View Post
    This isn’t a 50K car so don’t expect the gauge to be “smart” and to check the oil composition,
    You want a gauge that checks oil composition in the car? Have you lost your mind? Oil analysis is complex chemistry and requires lab conditions with sensitive sensors. No one does that in a car or a truck, or a aircraft.

  9. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by CRUISE-CRUZE View Post
    So, like I said, nothing sophisticate with this gauge! Miles and time are what it counts. The rest is market advertising….. If this was smart enough to adjust itself based of the “driving habits and the climate which the vehicle is operated” then would have another option giving the driver the possibility to set up the oil type, etc.
    the gauge is simply the answer to a constant calculation in the computer. GM Calibrates the OLM using the DEXOS1 specification for oil. they have factored in the variables that typically cause oil wear. engine temp, oil pressure, RPM, throttle position, duration, gear selection, outside air temperature, boost pressure, cam phasing ...anything that would change the operating conditions of the motor. everything is assigned a value. GM has verified that the OLM is accurately calibrated after millions of miles of varying conditions and through UOA testing.

    while the gauge itself is nothing sophisticated, the science behind the gauge is mind blowing.

    besides, what's mileage got to do with it? it's not like it's a shared sump transmission... what does the engine care how many miles the chassis has rolled?
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  10. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by montgom626 View Post
    You want a gauge that checks oil composition in the car? Have you lost your mind? Oil analysis is complex chemistry and requires lab conditions with sensitive sensors. No one does that in a car or a truck, or a aircraft.
    I wouldn’t go so far for 100% oil analyze. But the quantity, the viscosity, water content can be easy measured. However take a look below, Bosch system is already on BMW and Mercedes:
    General Motors Corporation GM Oil-Life™ System
    The General Motors (GM) Oil-Life System, first introduced commercially in the 1998 Oldsmobiles, determines when to change the oil and filter based on several operating conditions. The technology does not actually monitor any single quality or physical property of the oil. Instead, the Oil-Life System monitors engine revolutions, operating temperature, and other factors that affect the length of oil change intervals.

    The sensor is based on GM’s determination that nearly all driving conditions can be grouped into one of four categories: easy freeway driving; high-temperature, high-load service; city driving; or extreme short-term, cold-start driving. GM discovered that oil degradation in the first three categories was largely a function of the oil temperature. During extreme short-trip driving (the fourth category), the principle cause of oil degradation is water condensation and contaminants in the oil - the lower the oil temperature, the greater the contamination.
    The software automatically adjusts the oil change interval based on engine characteristics, driving habits and climate. When the system notifies the owner that it is time for an oil change, the owner can go to the nearest GM dealer and a technician will change the oil and filter, properly recycle the oil, then reset the vehicle’s oil life system.

    If the owner prefers to change his/her oil, the GM owner’s manual provides instructions on resetting the timer. Because the Oil-Life System does not actually sense oil condition, it is important for the engine computer to know when an oil change takes place. Therefore, the Oil Life System must be reset each time to ensure accurate and proper performance.
    It is now available on all light-duty North American GM cars except for some models of Buick Park Avenue and Le Sabre, Pontiac Bonneville and Sunfire/Sunbird, Chevrolet Tracker, Cavalier and Malibu, S10/Sonoma trucks, Astro/Safari Vans, and the Pontiac Vibe.
    DaimlerChrysler Corporation Flexible Service System
    DaimlerChrysler’s version of the oil monitor is called ASSYST in Europe and the Flexible Service System (FSS) in the United States. Like GM’s sensor, the FFS uses a computerized system to track multiple engine operating conditions. From research on oil quality through the span of an engine’s life, Daimler discovered that the breakdown in oil is determined by such factors as driving habits (frequent short trips vs. long trips), driving speed and failure to replenish low oil levels. Therefore, the FSS monitors time between oil changes, vehicle speed, coolant temperature, load signal, engine rpm, engine oil temperature and engine oil level. It uses this information to determine the remaining time and mileage before the next oil change and it displays the information in the vehicle’s instrument cluster.
    In addition, Daimler discovered that oil degradation is correlated directly with its ability to conduct electric current. Therefore, Daimler has fitted V-6 and V-8 engines with a digital oil quality dielectric sensor, that is mounted above the oil pan along with an analog oil level sensor. This sensor measures changes in capacitance, which effectively is a proxy for the amount and type of contaminants and oil degradation products present in the oil. An increase in dielectric constant (less resistance to electrical flow) indicates oil contamination and degradation.
    Daimler-Benz (Mercedes-Benz) has been incorporating the sensor into its vehicles since 1998.
    Delphi Corporation INTELLEK® Oil Condition Sensor
    The INTELLEK Oil Condition Sensor uses both a computer algorithm as well as a sensing element that directly measures various oil properties. The algorithm takes into account important factors affecting the rate of oil deterioration like temperature, driving severity, oil level and oil type. It measures the temperature every 10 seconds to verify whether it reaches a specific normal operating temperature before the engine shuts off. It also records the number of times the engine turns on and off.
    A proprietary capacitive sensing element is the core technology. It tracks the oil’s conductivity, detects water and glycol contamination, oil temperature, and determines the oil level. According to Delphi, the oil’s conductivity is important because it characterizes additive depletion and changes in viscosity and acid number.
    The INTELLEK Oil Condition Sensor tracks the many different parameters using onboard software to indicate when the oil is nearing the end of its service life. It attaches to the oil pan or wherever there is a continuous flow of oil.
    Continental Temic Microelectronic GmbH QLT Oil Condition Sensor
    The QLT sensor was launched in 1996 to monitor engine oil quality, level and temperature. Two sensors simultaneously and continuously monitor diesel engine oils containing soot. The instrument also monitors nitric oxide and oxidation products in spark-ignited engines, as well as water and fuel contamination. Because these factors influence the oil’s electrical properties and permittivity (ability of a material to resist the formation of an electric field within it), an effective oil condition sensor is achieved, according to the manufacturer.
    The QLT also has an integrated precision probe that allows it to measure critical temperatures and exact oil levels. It can track temperatures ranging from -40°C to 160°C. The oil level, up to 100 milliliters, is calculated by a second capacitor.
    Voelker Sensors Inc. Oil Insyte
    The Oil Insyte sensor uses a patented technology based on the electrical properties of an oil-insoluble polymeric bead matrix (see Automotive Sensor Technologies Explained below for more details). The Oil Insyte employs an in-line method for continuous oil condition monitoring with an LCD readout providing detailed information about oxidation, additive depletion, soot contamination and oil temperature. The technology does not require external calibration standards and reports oil condition independent of viscosity.

    Voelker Sensors Inc. - Oil Insyte
    According to the manufacturer, the sensor measures key indicators of oil degradation and allows the conventional analyses approach of oil monitoring (sampling and analysis) to be combined into a single more efficient analysis. No assumptions are required as to the condition of the engine or the initial baseline quality of the oil.
    The Oil Insyte technology measures oxidation and additive depletion, and has the ability to examine the interdependence between the two. They claim difficulties encountered with sensors that measure only the electrical properties of oil (conductive additives masking the true condition of the oil) are overcome by using a differential technique where the conductivity of the bead matrix is measured relative to the conductivity of the oil. The true polar condition of the oil can then be determined.
    The soot detection feature of the sensor determines the amount of undispersed agglomerated soot (vs. dispersed finely divided soot) present in the oil. Depending on the oil’s additive package, the same amount of undispersed soot can be present at 1 percent to 2 percent (for the base oil without dispersants) as a fully formulated motor oil with more than 7 percent soot.
    Lubrigard Ltd. Lubrigard Oil Condition Monitoring Sensor

    Lubrigard Ltd. - Lubrigard Oil Condition Monitoring Sensor

    The Lubrigard sensor unit is designed to be fitted by the original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) to new cars and trucks to warn the operator of abnormal lubricant conditions. According to the manufacturer, it indicates when an oil or filter change is necessary or when the oil should be inspected or tested.
    The sensor was designed to optimize oil drain intervals and to detect problems like coolant leaks, metallic wear debris and oil degradation by direct measurement. It is particularly useful for measuring high concentrations of soot in diesel engines’ crankcase oils.
    The sensor’s technology is based on the dielectric loss factor, also known as Tan Delta. According to Lubrigard, this method is more sensitive to changes in contamination than other dielectric measurements. At the same time, it is tolerant of normal differences in operating temperatures and lubricant formulations. To compensate temperature variations, a temperature sensor communicates with the unit’s microcontroller. The technology monitors soot, water, coolant, oxidation and/or wear particles.
    The sensor is designed so that it can be connected to the car’s onboard computer. Outputs and alarms are displayed in accordance with the auto maker’s preference. For example, a dashboard display could show a thermometer-type scale growing in size and changing color from green through amber to red as the oil degrades.
    The Lubrigard sensor is readily mountable on any engine, gearbox or hydraulic system, and it will work in both gasoline and diesel engine oils.
    Symyx Technologies Inc. Solid-State Oil Condition Sensor
    Symyx Technologies developed a sensor that uses a solid-state micromechanical resonator and a special signal-processing algorithm to measure important physical properties of lubricants. This sensor can measure three independent physical properties: viscosity, density and dielectric constant. This is significant technology because the direct measurement of a lubricant’s physical properties can provide important information about changing lubricant and engine health.
    The miniature sensor allows for innovative packaging and strategic placement of the sensor in an engine to provide in-situ oil analysis without negatively affecting the design parameters of an overall system. The extremely fast response time and signal processing of the sensor allows for real-time measurement of lubricant properties.
    According to Symyx, its solid-state resonator technology will operate in various types of fluid environments that experience a broad range of temperature, pressure, shock, vibration and fluid flow.
    Symyx is actively pursuing companies interested in using or licensing this technology to measure and monitor the quality and condition of lubricants and other fluids. Already, several Symyx licensees of the sensor are commercializing the technology for use in the industrial and consumer markets. It is also currently being used in Symyx’ laboratories to measure the physical properties of gases and liquids.
    Bosch GmbH Multifunction Oil Condition Sensor
    Bosch is developing a multifunctional oil sensor that will determine oil level and oil condition. The oil level information will allow the oil dipstick to be omitted from the automobile.
    Monitoring the engine oil condition is primarily intended to optimize oil drain intervals. However, it also provides increased insight into the actual state of the engine, which enables the possible detection of approaching engine failures or change in lubricant quality. The oil condition sensor will constantly measure the oil’s viscosity, permittivity, conductivity and temperature. The measured viscosity and permittivity (or dielectric constant) are the primary values supporting the oil condition evaluation. Commonly, chemical oil deterioration is associated with an increase in viscosity, whereas mechanical wear (shear) and fuel dilution lead to a decrease in viscosity.
    A novel microacoustic device determines the viscosity. This device utilizes the piezoelectric effect to electrically excite high-frequency mechanic (or acoustic) vibrations at a sensitive surface. When this sensitive surface comes into contact with the oil, the electrical device parameters, such as oscillation frequency and damping, are changed according to the oil’s mechanical properties, especially viscosity. Thus, the viscosity can be electrically detected by measuring these parameters. In contrast to conventional viscometers, which are commonly used in laboratory applications, the microacoustic sensor does not contain any moving parts. Furthermore, due to its small size, it can be easily incorporated into the multifunctional oil-level and condition sensor.
    Bosch’s multifunctional oil sensor is suitable for spark-ignition and diesel engines.
    Eaton Corporation Fluid Condition Monitor
    Eaton has developed a unique fluid condition monitor (FCM) technology that can monitor multiple fluid properties. The Eaton FCM is an in-situ real-time sensor based on impedance spectroscopy - a technology that measures multiple electrical properties of a fluid. It uses very small alternating current (AC) signals, which do not permanently disturb the fluid or the electrodes used in the measurement. Eaton’s FCM technology is differentiated by two critical attributes: it measures surface properties of the fluid in addition to bulk properties, and it has more degrees of freedom to enable the independent tracking of multiple lubricant parameters.
    Measuring bulk properties reveals information about the conductivity (concentration and charge of ions) and dielectric constant (size, shape, and polarizability of the base fluid and its additives). Measuring the surface properties provides a quantitative measure of the physical and chemical properties of a fluid at the fluid-to-metal interface. This is a powerful technique when it is correlated to the real and measured physiochemical property changes occurring in aging or stressed motor oils.
    The current prototype sensors are oil pan-mounted and include temperature-sensing capability. A small electronic module is used for signal conditioning, data capture and analysis.

  11. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by montgom626 View Post
    You tell me if linear or non-linear. My guess is "non-linear" from what I have read.
    ...yes, that was my initial inclination, but that RR=0.9999 value (albeit from only three data sets) surly indicates otherwise.

    ...I expected an exponentially decaying curve, ie: the closer you get, the faster the decay...but (so far) the data looks linear.
    2011 Chevrolet Cruze LTZ 1.4LT 6A
    2009 Pontiac Vibe 1.8L/SFI 4A
    2004 Pontiac Vibe 1.8L/MFI 4A

    1971 Dodge Charger 318 3A
    1970˝ Plymouth AAR 'Cuda 340/6BBL 4M
    1968 Dodge Charger 383 3A
    1967 Plymouth Barracuda Formula-S 383 4M
    1965 Plymouth Barracuda Formula-S 273 4M

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