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    1. · Administrator
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      14,726 Posts
      Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
      How-To: Replace Turbo Oil Feed Line


      Overview:
      The turbo oil feed line has a tendency to leak at the engine block seal after about 50,000 miles or 3 years. The replacement feed line on 2011-2013 models includes two o-rings instead of one in addition to an integrated heat shield over the o-rings and a heat shield around the length of the line to prevent oil coking and reduce oil temperatures. If this line is leaking, you will be able to see oil pooled up underneath it on the block's casting ridges in this picture.


      Tools Required:
      - E10 socket (A set is available on Amazon.com)
      - Ratchet
      - T45 Torx bit (A set is available on Amazon.com)
      - Lb-ft Torque wrench (Available on Amazon.com)
      - In-lb torque wrench (Available on Amazon.com)


      Part Required:
      GM part number: 55592600 (Available on Amazon.com)


      Procedure:
      Remove the three E10 bolts holding the heat shield over the turbo



      Remove the E10 bolt holding the feed line onto the engine block


      Loosen the T45 banjo/hollow bolt holding the feed line to the turbo, but do not remove entirely


      Pull feed line from engine block. This took quite a bit of wiggling for me, but eventually popped out. Once you get it out, remove the turbo bolt. You should find two copper washers; one above and one below the feed line. The one below the feed line may be stuck to the turbo. If it is, a gentle tap to its outer edge with a flat-head screwdriver will loosen it. Be sure not to scratch the mating surface.

      Clean the mating surface on the turbo of any debris, taking care not to scrape dust into the turbo.

      Install new feed line. Be careful not to lose the two copper washers.

      Torque T45 banjo bolt on the turbo to 30 Nm (22 lb ft). Torque the E10 bolt on the engine block to 10 Nm (89 lb in), or about "hand snug." Do not over-tighten this last bolt or you will have a really bad day. I recommend actually using an in-lb torque wrench for this.


      Start the car and check for leaks.

      Reinstall heat shield and torque E10 bolts also to "hand snug."

      Old vs New photos:

       

      Attachments

    2. · Registered
      Joined
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      1 Posts
      How-To: Replace Turbo Oil Feed Line


      Overview:
      The turbo oil feed line has a tendency to leak at the engine block seal after about 50,000 miles or 3 years. The replacement feed line on 2011-2013 models includes two o-rings instead of one in addition to an integrated heat shield over the o-rings and a heat shield around the length of the line to prevent oil coking and reduce oil temperatures. If this line is leaking, you will be able to see oil pooled up underneath it on the block's casting ridges in this picture.


      Tools Required:


      Part Required:
      GM part number: 55592600 (Available on Amazon.com)


      Procedure:
      Remove the three E10 bolts holding the heat shield over the turbo



      Remove the E10 bolt holding the feed line onto the engine block


      Loosen the T45 banjo/hollow bolt holding the feed line to the turbo, but do not remove entirely


      Pull feed line from engine block. This took quite a bit of wiggling for me, but eventually popped out. Once you get it out, remove the turbo bolt. You should find two copper washers; one above and one below the feed line. The one below the feed line may be stuck to the turbo. If it is, a gentle tap to its outer edge with a flat-head screwdriver will loosen it. Be sure not to scratch the mating surface.

      Clean the mating surface on the turbo of any debris, taking care not to scrape dust into the turbo.

      Install new feed line. Be careful not to lose the two copper washers.

      Torque T45 banjo bolt on the turbo to 30 Nm (22 lb ft). Torque the E10 bolt on the engine block to 10 Nm (89 lb in), or about "hand snug." Do not over-tighten this last bolt or you will have a really bad day. I recommend actually using an in-lb torque wrench for this.


      Start the car and check for leaks.

      Reinstall heat shield and torque E10 bolts also to "hand snug."

      Old vs New photos:

      Ive over tightened now its stripped and leaking oil. What are my choices now to fix the issue.
       
    3. · Registered
      Joined
      ·
      50 Posts
      How-To: Replace Turbo Oil Feed Line


      Overview:
      The turbo oil feed line has a tendency to leak at the engine block seal after about 50,000 miles or 3 years. The replacement feed line on 2011-2013 models includes two o-rings instead of one in addition to an integrated heat shield over the o-rings and a heat shield around the length of the line to prevent oil coking and reduce oil temperatures. If this line is leaking, you will be able to see oil pooled up underneath it on the block's casting ridges in this picture.


      Tools Required:


      Part Required:
      GM part number: 55592600 (Available on Amazon.com)


      Procedure:
      Remove the three E10 bolts holding the heat shield over the turbo



      Remove the E10 bolt holding the feed line onto the engine block


      Loosen the T45 banjo/hollow bolt holding the feed line to the turbo, but do not remove entirely


      Pull feed line from engine block. This took quite a bit of wiggling for me, but eventually popped out. Once you get it out, remove the turbo bolt. You should find two copper washers; one above and one below the feed line. The one below the feed line may be stuck to the turbo. If it is, a gentle tap to its outer edge with a flat-head screwdriver will loosen it. Be sure not to scratch the mating surface.

      Clean the mating surface on the turbo of any debris, taking care not to scrape dust into the turbo.

      Install new feed line. Be careful not to lose the two copper washers.

      Torque T45 banjo bolt on the turbo to 30 Nm (22 lb ft). Torque the E10 bolt on the engine block to 10 Nm (89 lb in), or about "hand snug." Do not over-tighten this last bolt or you will have a really bad day. I recommend actually using an in-lb torque wrench for this.


      Start the car and check for leaks.

      Reinstall heat shield and torque E10 bolts also to "hand snug."

      Old vs New photos:

      Sorry for the language and getting mad, but I followed your torque spec info on here because I do my best to follow torque specs. And this is one time where it bit me in the a**.
      How-To: Replace Turbo Oil Feed Line


      Overview:
      The turbo oil feed line has a tendency to leak at the engine block seal after about 50,000 miles or 3 years. The replacement feed line on 2011-2013 models includes two o-rings instead of one in addition to an integrated heat shield over the o-rings and a heat shield around the length of the line to prevent oil coking and reduce oil temperatures. If this line is leaking, you will be able to see oil pooled up underneath it on the block's casting ridges in this picture.


      Tools Required:


      Part Required:
      GM part number: 55592600 (Available on Amazon.com)


      Procedure:
      Remove the three E10 bolts holding the heat shield over the turbo



      Remove the E10 bolt holding the feed line onto the engine block


      Loosen the T45 banjo/hollow bolt holding the feed line to the turbo, but do not remove entirely


      Pull feed line from engine block. This took quite a bit of wiggling for me, but eventually popped out. Once you get it out, remove the turbo bolt. You should find two copper washers; one above and one below the feed line. The one below the feed line may be stuck to the turbo. If it is, a gentle tap to its outer edge with a flat-head screwdriver will loosen it. Be sure not to scratch the mating surface.

      Clean the mating surface on the turbo of any debris, taking care not to scrape dust into the turbo.

      Install new feed line. Be careful not to lose the two copper washers.

      Torque T45 banjo bolt on the turbo to 30 Nm (22 lb ft). Torque the E10 bolt on the engine block to 10 Nm (89 lb in), or about "hand snug." Do not over-tighten this last bolt or you will have a really bad day. I recommend actually using an in-lb torque wrench for this.


      Start the car and check for leaks.

      Reinstall heat shield and torque E10 bolts also to "hand snug."

      Old vs New photos:

      Sorry for the language and getting mad but I try to follow torque specs to the "t" and this time bit me in the a** following someone else's info.
       
    4. · Registered
      Joined
      ·
      1 Posts
      How-To: Replace Turbo Oil Feed Line


      Overview:
      The turbo oil feed line has a tendency to leak at the engine block seal after about 50,000 miles or 3 years. The replacement feed line on 2011-2013 models includes two o-rings instead of one in addition to an integrated heat shield over the o-rings and a heat shield around the length of the line to prevent oil coking and reduce oil temperatures. If this line is leaking, you will be able to see oil pooled up underneath it on the block's casting ridges in this picture.


      Tools Required:


      Part Required:
      GM part number: 55592600 (Available on Amazon.com)


      Procedure:
      Remove the three E10 bolts holding the heat shield over the turbo



      Remove the E10 bolt holding the feed line onto the engine block


      Loosen the T45 banjo/hollow bolt holding the feed line to the turbo, but do not remove entirely


      Pull feed line from engine block. This took quite a bit of wiggling for me, but eventually popped out. Once you get it out, remove the turbo bolt. You should find two copper washers; one above and one below the feed line. The one below the feed line may be stuck to the turbo. If it is, a gentle tap to its outer edge with a flat-head screwdriver will loosen it. Be sure not to scratch the mating surface.

      Clean the mating surface on the turbo of any debris, taking care not to scrape dust into the turbo.

      Install new feed line. Be careful not to lose the two copper washers.

      Torque T45 banjo bolt on the turbo to 30 Nm (22 lb ft). Torque the E10 bolt on the engine block to 10 Nm (89 lb in), or about "hand snug." Do not over-tighten this last bolt or you will have a really bad day. I recommend actually using an in-lb torque wrench for this.


      Start the car and check for leaks.

      Reinstall heat shield and torque E10 bolts also to "hand snug."

      Old vs New photos:

      So I have this problem with that. Something that supposed to be an easy fix became a really annoying one. The screw is stripped. Any idea and how to take it out ??
       
    1. · Administrator
      2014 LT program car, Pull Me Over Red, 1.4T Auto
      Joined
      ·
      14,181 Posts
      Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
      I am currently doing a hurry up and fix it at the last few days of my powertrain warranty. Based on what I discovered in this thread:

      What are these oil leaks from?


      I think that they will at least change the CPASV seals and the valve cover gasket and probably the oil pan gasket. I am going to ask about my trans cooler lines which could be leaking as well. What are the items that I should buy (I have access to Amazon Prime and can get them the day before I turn in my car if I order today). I am also having the coolant drained and filled with Amsoil coolant/booster by the same mechanic, but not by the dealer. So far my PCV valve is holding up so I am not currently concerned about that, but will install @XtremeRevolution 's fix in the future. So what are the items I should have on hand in case something else is bad or will go bad due to having these items serviced? I am guessing about the following:

      ACDelco 25193343 GM Original Equipment Positive Crank Ventilation (PCV) Valve Pipe with Bypass Valve Tube

      ACDelco 55573017 Valve Assembly, Evaporator

      55592600 PIPE 3.358


      Am I missing anything or have too much?
       
    1. · Administrator
      Joined
      ·
      14,726 Posts
      Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
      Tips and Tricks for Gen1 Cruze Turbo Replacement

      Overview:
      I didn't get enough pictures to make a complete tutorial for this one, but I'll try to walk you through the process, and focus instead on the difficult parts. I've had people tell me this was a pretty difficult job, but I didn't find that to be the case once you figure out a few key aspects. I recommend having a means of alternate transportation available in case you need to run to the hardware store for anything.


      Tools Required
      - 17mm wrench
      - E-socket set
      - Metric hex bit set
      - Metric socket set
      - Torx bit set
      - Flathead screwdriver
      - Pliers
      - Flex extensions (Available on Amazon.com)
      - lb-in and lb-ft torque wrenches


      Parts Required:
      - 2 gallons of 50/50 coolant mix (or 1 gallon 100% with 1 gallon distilled water to mix yourself)
      - Shallow bucket/pan
      - Turbo gasket (Available on Amazon.com)
      - Turbo oil return pipe (Available on Amazon.com)
      - Turbo oil feed line (Available on Amazon.com)
      - 8 Exhaust manifold nuts (Available in a pack on Amazon.com)

      Note: you technically only need to replace the seals on the turbo oil return pipe and the turbo oil feed line, but with the return pipe being brittle and breaking easily, and the feed line having o-rings that do the same, and the price being not much more to just get entire new kits, it's better to just replace them altogether.


      Procedure:
      Always remove the negative battery terminal when working on your car.

      1. Start by removing the downpipe. That's the exhaust pipe containing the catalytic converter that comes right off the turbo. Use some penetrating oil if you need to. The downpipe bolts won't come off easily so use some heat if you need to. There's a hidden bracket bolt as well in front of the oil pan that you need to remove, and a bracket it is connected to. Remove this bracket as well! If you don't remove it, you won't have enough clearance to get the coolant lines off.

      2. Remove the heat shield on the turbo and the turbo oil feed line as explained in this tutorial: https://www.cruzetalk.com/forum/129...s/118210-how-replace-turbo-oil-feed-line.html. Also remove the anchors for the bolts that hold the heat shield on.

      3. Remove the wastegate actuator. You'll need this off to get access to the copper nuts.

      4. Remove the intake, and disconnect the bypass valve.

      5. The turbo is being held on by a series of copper nuts. These are one-time use. The most difficult one to get to will be the lower passenger side bolt. I have a trick for this. Use a socket on a flex extension to get to it. If you decided not to buy the flex extensions, you're going to hate life for about 15 minutes trying to get that one nut off. Remove all copper nuts except the one on the top right, leaving it barely threaded on, so the turbo doesn't fall off. Should look like this (but with the wastegate actuator off)


      6. Drain the coolant, following this tutorial: https://www.cruzetalk.com/forum/129...2011-2016-cruze-antifreeze-coolant-flush.html

      7. Next, get underneath the car, and you should have a clear view of the turbo. First, remove the turbo oil return line. Disconnect it from the turbo first. On the engine block side, it simply lifts out.

      8. Using the 17mm wrench, take your time to loosen and disconnect the coolant lines, starting with the bottom one, then going to the top. Note, even though you drained the coolant from the system already, you'll still lose quite a bit of coolant in this step, so be prepared for the waterfall. This is a departure from the GM procedure which has you removing the coolant lines from the block, not the turbo. You'll be glad you separated the turbo from the engine block at this point as you'll have much more clearance to work under there.

      9. Once the cooler lines are off, you can remove the turbo from the engine bay.

      10. Put everything back together in reverse order. Torque specs are as follows:

      - Turbo copper nuts: 71 lb-in. See attachment for tightening sequence.
      - Turbo oil return line: 71 lb-in
      - Turbo banjo bolt: 15 lb-ft
      - Turbo feed pipe retaining bolt: 71 lb-in
       

      Attachments

    1. · Registered
      2013 Cruze LT
      Joined
      ·
      4,284 Posts
      Looks like the turbo oil feed line.


      Part: Amazon.com: 55592600 PIPE 3.358 : Automotive

       
    2. · Registered
      2011 1.4L 2LT 6A
      Joined
      ·
      92 Posts
      Discussion Starter · #3 ·
      Looks like the turbo oil feed line.


      Part: Amazon.com: 55592600 PIPE 3.358 : Automotive

      cool, they had it at a local auto parts shop for $30 so that’s pretty cool. It was still the OEM piece too and that car is 10 years old with 100k miles, surprising that it lasted that long.
       
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