Chevrolet Cruze Forums banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So my 2012 Eco Cruze is doing the common surging/jerking under acceleration. If I let it idle for a long time then the idle will jump around on me. It has done this ever since I've owned it. The symptoms get A LOT better when I am running 93 octane, but they don't totally go away. The car is plain annoying to drive with 87 octane. Shes got 80K on the clock. I have already changed the spark plugs to NGKs. I have been hearing from the people that get the tuning, that this problem goes away after the vehicle is tuned. I have been considering getting a tune ever since I bought the car. If the tune helps my problem that would definitely push me over the edge to get it. Anybody out there have some advice?Thanks

IMG_3673.jpg
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
25,596 Posts
Switch to 91 or 93 octane ASAP. My 2012 ECO MT is a complete slug on 87 octane, to the extent that it feels like the engine is missing when under load. Also, ensure your plugs are consistently gapped - the ECU is really picky about plug gaps. If you get a tune you'll need to run premium anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I've been running premium ever since I found out how much better it runs on it. I feel like it still doesn't run as it should. Still jerks me around on acceleration, just not near as much. If the tuning will help that, then that's enough for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
No one is recommending any tuning tho huh?
 

·
Administrator, Resident Tater Salad
Joined
·
17,359 Posts
A tune won't fix something that seems to be a problem with your car.

I am on stock tune and have never had any of the issues that you describe with my 2012. Jumpy/laggy acceleration on 87 octane, sure, but never any problems with idle or acceleration on NGK plugs on 93 octane.

Do you see oil on the hoses around the throttle body? Do you hear a hissing sound from the valve under the spark plug cover at idle?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
There is oil around the throttle body hoses, or at least a little drip underneath when I put my hand under them. I haven't noticed a hissing sound but I haven't listened for it either.
 

·
Administrator, Resident Tater Salad
Joined
·
17,359 Posts
That is my thinking too.

Pull off the PCV tube from the top of the intake manifold and look for the orange check valve (small dot) inside. If it's not there, that's causing the oil buildup and the intake manifold will have to be replaced.

Oil making its way all the way into the top of the engine, or a vacuum leak from the Blown PCV disc, could definitely cause hesitation problems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
that's causing the oil buildup and the intake manifold will have to be replaced.
I have to ask because I'm having the same issue, is it necessary to replace the intake manifold if the oil leak is fixed by replacing the check valve? I haven't had any check engine lights, but I caught the problem due to the unusual idle surges.

What would be the repercussions if I did not spend $200 on a new intake manifold? The fuel efficiency savings earned from this car is being eaten by these costly parts...
 

·
Administrator, Resident Tater Salad
Joined
·
17,359 Posts
I have to ask because I'm having the same issue, is it necessary to replace the intake manifold if the oil leak is fixed by replacing the check valve? I haven't had any check engine lights, but I caught the problem due to the unusual idle surges.

What would be the repercussions if I did not spend $200 on a new intake manifold? The fuel efficiency savings earned from this car is being eaten by these costly parts...
Check valve is integrated into the intake manifold. Stupid design.

Not replacing it will result in more oil consumption and probably more cam cover burst disc replacements.

XR thinks he has an alternative to the check valve in the intake manifold that will not fail again. His thread is around here somewhere.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
15,750 Posts
The intake manifold I'm seeing costs $280 on rockauto; more from the dealership. Some lucky people found theirs for $200 on ebay, but that's naturally limited stock. No aftermarket options that I've come across yet.

If you don't replace the intake manifold or install my retrofit, you'll keep blowing valve covers in addition to finding oil leaks/seepage everywhere around your engine and seeping oil past turbo seals. You'll also begin consuming oil more rapidly, which if left unchecked may eventually cause detonation and piston damage (early on, GM noted oil consumption as one of the causes of their 2011-2012 model piston failures).

This is not something you want to avoid fixing for too long or it will cause more headaches and expenses. Either fork over the $280-$350 for a new intake manifold and save money for when it fails again, or install my fix and be done with it permanently. Absolute worst case, the check valve I'm using gets gummed up to the point of failure (this will take a good 50,000+ miles, and you have to replace it with another $13 check valve. Hardly an issue, and something you can prevent with a periodic cleaning as the check valve I chose is very over-built for its application.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
The intake manifold I'm seeing costs $280 on rockauto; more from the dealership. Some lucky people found theirs for $200 on ebay, but that's naturally limited stock. No aftermarket options that I've come across yet.

If you don't replace the intake manifold or install my retrofit, you'll keep blowing valve covers in addition to finding oil leaks/seepage everywhere around your engine and seeping oil past turbo seals. You'll also begin consuming oil more rapidly, which if left unchecked may eventually cause detonation and piston damage (early on, GM noted oil consumption as one of the causes of their 2011-2012 model piston failures).

This is not something you want to avoid fixing for too long or it will cause more headaches and expenses. Either fork over the $280-$350 for a new intake manifold and save money for when it fails again, or install my fix and be done with it permanently. Absolute worst case, the check valve I'm using gets gummed up to the point of failure (this will take a good 50,000+ miles, and you have to replace it with another $13 check valve. Hardly an issue, and something you can prevent with a periodic cleaning as the check valve I chose is very over-built for its application.
I've been monitoring how much oil comes out of the pan, and nothing has been shy of 4L. However, I'm not going to ignore this problem, and I'm seriously looking into your write-up. I trust the judgement of some administrators of a forum better than those corporate-bureaucrats at GM. I'm realizing that this is probably the reason why my CPASV continues to leak after I replaced the o-rings, along with my other small leaks

I'm baffled at the fact GM hasn't addressed this, although at the same time, GM is already on my poopy-list because of what they did to my mother. They're continuing to dig their own grave.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
25,596 Posts
I had my intake manifold/check valve replaced around 97K miles. At my oil change yesterday (100,000 miles) the inside of my engine bay was "dry" with no oil seepage anywhere. Now to go find a good engine cleaner so I can get all the residual oil, salt, and road grime out of the engine bay.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
The intake manifold I'm seeing costs $280 on rockauto; more from the dealership. Some lucky people found theirs for $200 on ebay, but that's naturally limited stock. No aftermarket options that I've come across yet.

If you don't replace the intake manifold or install my retrofit, you'll keep blowing valve covers in addition to finding oil leaks/seepage everywhere around your engine and seeping oil past turbo seals. You'll also begin consuming oil more rapidly, which if left unchecked may eventually cause detonation and piston damage (early on, GM noted oil consumption as one of the causes of their 2011-2012 model piston failures).

This is not something you want to avoid fixing for too long or it will cause more headaches and expenses. Either fork over the $280-$350 for a new intake manifold and save money for when it fails again, or install my fix and be done with it permanently. Absolute worst case, the check valve I'm using gets gummed up to the point of failure (this will take a good 50,000+ miles, and you have to replace it with another $13 check valve. Hardly an issue, and something you can prevent with a periodic cleaning as the check valve I chose is very over-built for its application.
Just changed my oil. Missing about 500ml from normal 4L. Significant amount, but I think I had a leak from my oil drain plug. I replaced the gasket for the first time in a year (Probably about 40k miles.)

I'm not sure if the oil loss is from the plug, or from oil consumption. Maybe both. Either way, I want to crack open the intake manifold this weekend to check for oil. I'll be following your instructions.

By the way, when I have it open, I plan on cleaning it. Recommendations?

Someone elsewhere said use oven cleaner, however this is plastic, not metal, so I think that's a bad idea. Someone else said soak it in Dawn sink detergent overnight. I'm going to go with that method. What is your opinion?

I'm hoping I can just assess the damage now, clean it while I have it off, and then buy your kit to bypass the problem later on.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
15,750 Posts
Just changed my oil. Missing about 500ml from normal 4L. Significant amount, but I think I had a leak from my oil drain plug. I replaced the gasket for the first time in a year (Probably about 40k miles.)

I'm not sure if the oil loss is from the plug, or from oil consumption. Maybe both. Either way, I want to crack open the intake manifold this weekend to check for oil. I'll be following your instructions.

By the way, when I have it open, I plan on cleaning it. Recommendations?

Someone elsewhere said use oven cleaner, however this is plastic, not metal, so I think that's a bad idea. Someone else said soak it in Dawn sink detergent overnight. I'm going to go with that method. What is your opinion?

I'm hoping I can just assess the damage now, clean it while I have it off, and then buy your kit to bypass the problem later on.
In 15,622 miles of driving on one change of oil with AMSOIL Signature Series 0W-20, I did not consume any measurable amount of oil between changes. As such, I consider 500ml to be unacceptable.

You don't really need to remove the intake manifold to verify it is defective; just pull the corrugated hose off the top and look inside. I have a new thread created recently that explains how to do this. http://www.cruzetalk.com/forum/34-g...4-pcv-valve-cover-intake-manifold-issues.html

Cleaning it won't do you any good unless you're about to install the kit, as it will just get messy again.

I used brake clean to clean the spare manifold I had (with a missing check valve).
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top