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Here are my UOA for the entire time I have been using Amsoil. The TBN is fairly low in all samples but note the very low iron. That is proof that it is still doing it's job. I changed to 10w30 this time per Xtreme's recommendation so we'll see how that does.
 

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Here are my UOA for the entire time I have been using Amsoil. The TBN is fairly low in all samples but note the very low iron. That is proof that it is still doing it's job. I changed to 10w30 this time per Xtreme's recommendation so we'll see how that does.
I've actually done some research into this behavior. Turns out AMSOIL uses a proprietary detergent package that for some reason drops the TBN level rather quickly. However, the TBN hovers above condemnation levels for as long as anyone has cared to take it with only a handful of exceptions. I have one analysis on a Ford Focus that went just shy of 60k miles and the TBN is in the low 2.x range. It is a very nonlinear decay.

From what I've seen, as long as your TBN is above 1.0, you won't have problems. If the TBN is depleted, the oil begins to become acidic, which causes soft metal corrosion. It would start to show up in higher copper numbers, for example. All of those samples could have made it to AMSOIL's advertised 15k mile interval.

Thanks for posting that report. It's great to see a long term trending analysis.
 

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Here are my UOA for the entire time I have been using Amsoil. The TBN is fairly low in all samples but note the very low iron. That is proof that it is still doing it's job. I changed to 10w30 this time per Xtreme's recommendation so we'll see how that does.
I learned recently that AMSOIL has changed the formulation of the Signature Series oil. I first noticed some specification changes in the middle of February when the volatility of the 5W-30 went from 6.9% to 7.4%. I figured they had changed the base oil. What they actually changed was the additive package. They have improved the durability of the oil (with respect to anything related to extended drain intervals) by 25%. I am very curious how this will be reflected on an oil analyses moving forward.
 

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This was in Andy Quade​'s car, at 16,150 miles using AMSOIL Signature Series 5W-30. Filter change was done at 5k and 10k mles.

Mod list on this engine includes: CX Racing FMIC, BNR Catless Downpipe, Magnaflow Catback, K&N intake, Forge Atmospheric BOV, Trifecta Tune, pushing up to 23psi.

Driving conditions as quoted by Andy are "a lot of highway good amount of city and I beat the **** out of it run it to redline race and all"

The only significant flagged item was the TBN, and AMSOIL Technical Services had this to say about it from another analysis:
It is not uncommon for engine oils to have a loss of TBN over their life spans, particularly to the level you are seeing. Often they will dip and hang a few points above condemnation levels for their life span like what you are seeing. The formulations and additive packages have an effect on TBN and the levels that they start and how they drop, but since these are proprietary, we are not able to discuss them. What you are seeing is not uncommon and I know that because of how they can drop right away, but still hang above condemnation levels it is not considered an issue with how they are performing. We don’t have any recommendations of maintaining high TBN levels since it’s just the nature of the oils to do this.
Oil Analyzers Inc (a private label for Polaris Labs) said, in this analysis report,
"Replace oil filter and top off system with fresh make-up oil if not done when oil sample was taken. Re-sample in 3,500 miles or 65 hours.
That would mean that this specific Trifecta tuned Cruze 1.4T, under these driving conditions, is recommended by Polaris Labs to go ~20k miles on an oil change before needing to be tested to determine *whether or not* it should be changed. Given the rate of TBN decay in this particular engine, 25k miles is not out of the question, but I would still recommend an oil analysis before attempting that as your driving conditions will vary.

One thing to remember: AMSOIL recommends only 15k miles in all turbocharged vehicles for engine oil as they are considered to be under the "Severe Service" maintenance interval. Not only is this a severe service application, but it is also modified to produce significantly more power than stock, and we are still looking at a Polaris Labs recommendation of ~20,000 miles on a change of oil before being tested again.
 

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In My opinion that is an irresponsible recommendation on their part! On their own report they have flagged the oil as highly abnormal and although they state the iron is at an exceptable level it's over triple what I've been seeing. Not to mention he is far, far past the manufacturers recommended OCI. If I were him I'd change it pronto!
 

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In My opinion that is an irresponsible recommendation on their part! On their own report they have flagged the oil as highly abnormal and although they state the iron is at an exceptable level it's over triple what I've been seeing. Not to mention he is far, far past the manufacturers recommended OCI. If I were him I'd change it pronto!
Polaris Labs does not make mistakes that can be written off as irresponsible, I can assure you that much. Polaris Labs services companies such as Allison, Cummins, Ingersoll-Rand, and Conoco Phillips, just to name a few of their 100+ private label customers. OAI is just one of those. The TBN flagged was explained in thorough detail in my last post. The flagged elements are all automatically flagged by a computer due to hard-coded triggers. It is a well known fact, verifiable through trending analysis of that specific oils series, that TBN hovers above condemnation levels for a very long time as an expected behavior of that oil, which does not affect its ability to neutralize acidity. As demonstrated in this oil analysis, a flagged abnormal property does not necessarily require cause for action or concern. In this case, a filter change was recommended with some make-up oil added and another 3,500 miles driven. We see absolutely no abnormal or elevated soft metal wear, which would be evident on an oil that had depleted its TBN reserve.

This vehicle was not only driven hard, but was driven hard for 16,150 miles, and was driven hard with a full set of bolt-on modifications and a tune. Considering this was a tuned 1.4T regularly raced and driven to redline, these numbers are spectacular. You cannot validly make a comparison to other vehicles and their analysis reports because the driving conditions and stress levels vary so greatly.

1,150 miles is not all that far past the recommended OCI, and GM's OCI is based on the quality of their semi-synthetic mineral oil so that's irrelevant. I see nothing in this analysis that indicates this oil was not capable of protecting the engine. The viscosity held perfectly (increasing ever so slightly due to very minor oxidation), there is still plenty of reserve TBN, and none of the metallic wear levels indicated cause for concern.

If you have a technical reason for why this oil would be unable to do its job given the information I've provided, I wouldn't mind hearing it. I am not just saying this to defend AMSOIL products; I sincerely see no reason, based on my knowledge of the behavior of ASMOIL's proprietary detergent formulation and the oil analysis posted above, that this oil was not suitable for continued use.
 

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I recently found some information that is relevant to anyone reading this thread. This is regarding Boron levels and flagged wear numbers. This came directly from OAI in an e-mail sent to someone else.

Low Boron level readings are an issue we are working to resolve. The problem comes not from the lubricants, but from the lab equipment itself. The same test procedure is used to determine all metal levels contained in a sample, but the specific wavelength for Boron is subject to interference from contaminants found in used oil samples, so the readings are lower (less accurate) than for the other metals.

Since the interference only results in low readings for used oil samples, the Boron levels for new, unused baseline samples are not affected. Because the used sample readings for Boron are lower than the Boron readings for the new, unused baseline samples, the lab is obligated to bring the difference to your attention and will flag the results accordingly.

We are working to determine if a different test method can eliminate the interference that causes the lower Boron readings. The easy way out would be to simply change the flagging limits, but since the Boron is still present in the oil, more accurate measurements would be a better solution to the issue.

Until that issue can be resolved, it may suffice to explain that the Boron is still present and performing its role as an anti-wear additive based on the wear protection shown by the amount of wear metals present in the report. Wear metals are flagged at levels expected to be found at normal drain intervals for a given component. Using the two reports you included in your email, Lab Number S-426230 shows no elevated wear metal levels at 18,379 miles of use. None are even at Severity 1, which is merely the upper half of the normal range. Lab Number I-544439 flags Iron at Severity 1 with 41,000 miles on the sample. The second sample, taken 29,000 miles later, is flagged at a Severity 2, but is only 7 ppm higher, indicating the rate of wear is minimal. While 118 ppm of Iron would be considered abnormal for a Cummins ISX engine at 25,000 miles, it is not abnormal for oil with nearly three times that many miles. Unfortunately the lab cannot adjust the flagging limits based on the mileage on the sample or this would eliminate what is “normal” and what is “abnormal”.
 

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Polaris Labs does not make mistakes that can be written off as irresponsible, I can assure you that much. Polaris Labs services companies such as Allison, Cummins, Ingersoll-Rand, and Conoco Phillips, just to name a few of their 100+ private label customers. OAI is just one of those. The TBN flagged was explained in thorough detail in my last post. The flagged elements are all automatically flagged by a computer due to hard-coded triggers. It is a well known fact, verifiable through trending analysis of that specific oils series, that TBN hovers above condemnation levels for a very long time as an expected behavior of that oil, which does not affect its ability to neutralize acidity. As demonstrated in this oil analysis, a flagged abnormal property does not necessarily require cause for action or concern. In this case, a filter change was recommended with some make-up oil added and another 3,500 miles driven. We see absolutely no abnormal or elevated soft metal wear, which would be evident on an oil that had depleted its TBN reserve.

This vehicle was not only driven hard, but was driven hard for 16,150 miles, and was driven hard with a full set of bolt-on modifications and a tune. Considering this was a tuned 1.4T regularly raced and driven to redline, these numbers are spectacular. You cannot validly make a comparison to other vehicles and their analysis reports because the driving conditions and stress levels vary so greatly.

1,150 miles is not all that far past the recommended OCI, and GM's OCI is based on the quality of their semi-synthetic mineral oil so that's irrelevant. I see nothing in this analysis that indicates this oil was not capable of protecting the engine. The viscosity held perfectly (increasing ever so slightly due to very minor oxidation), there is still plenty of reserve TBN, and none of the metallic wear levels indicated cause for concern.

If you have a technical reason for why this oil would be unable to do its job given the information I've provided, I wouldn't mind hearing it. I am not just saying this to defend AMSOIL products; I sincerely see no reason, based on my knowledge of the behavior of ASMOIL's proprietary detergent formulation and the oil analysis posted above, that this oil was not suitable for continued use.
To each his own. Only time will tell the story. But you will never convince me that a car doing 20k OCI is going to last as long as one doing less than half that. Regardless if the oil is still usable or not the higher levels of iron and silicon will make the oil more abrasive compounding the ware rate.
 

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To each his own. Only time will tell the story. But you will never convince me that a car doing 20k OCI is going to last as long as one doing less than half that. Regardless if the oil is still usable or not the higher levels of iron and silicon will make the oil more abrasive compounding the ware rate.
These contaminants are in the sub-20 microns in size. The filter is designed to catch almost all contaminants that can cause damage, and as you can see, even the silicon here is very low.

I posted a thread a while back in another section about oil drain intervals recommended by manufacturers in Europe, where oils of this quality are mainstream. Synthetic oils make up 8% of our automotive lubrication market, which is a massive contrast to Europe's over 50%. It is very unusual to buy a car in Europe brand new that specs a sub-10,000 mile oil drain interval. The trends are going toward 20k miles or 2 years. This includes the high end brands such as Audi. Americans' ignorance is fueled by the poor quality of our lubricants when it comes to drain intervals.

I have other high mileage oil analysis reports that refute the notion that contaminants increase wear consequentially. I haven't posted them here because they aren't taken from a Cruze, but I have a Ford Focus at 59k a Honda Fit at just under 24k, and a 5.3 Silverado at 26k (among a few others). As noted by OAI's response, even the flagged wear levels do not take mileage into consideration. 68ppm of Iron is not at all noteworthy for a 16,150 mile sample of any oil, let alone one driven under these conditions. Any abrasion would be evident in soft metal and piston ring wear. We see only 1ppm of Chromium (piston ring material), 11ppm of Aluminum, and 2ppm of Copper (bearing material), which makes it evident that the oil is not abrasive with these contamination levels present.

This is Andy's third run of AMSOIL SS. The previous two were at 15,000 miles each but he didn't bother having it analyzed. I felt this run would be an accurate representation of the oil's capabilities since it showed the results of consistent use, unlike Terry's which had some cross-contamination from the previous run of Mobil 1.
 

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I personally drove a Chevy Astro Van to 250,000 mi before it was wrecked. It had Amsoil SS 5w30 in it the whole time. Changed it about once a year or 20-25k mi. The first half of its life was doing very short trips so many days it was never warmed up. One thing taking samples did was to alert to an internal coolant leak that I was able to repair before it caused major damage.
 

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I personally drove a Chevy Astro Van to 250,000 mi before it was wrecked. It had Amsoil SS 5w30 in it the whole time. Changed it about once a year or 20-25k mi. The first half of its life was doing very short trips so many days it was never warmed up. One thing taking samples did was to alert to an internal coolant leak that I was able to repair before it caused major damage.
This is why I recommend everyone get periodic oil analysis done. It can save you a lot of money.
 

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Mobil 1 EP; 6,066 miles. This is CruzeEcoBlueTopaz's oil analysis.

http://www.cruzetalk.com/forum/attachments/1-4l-turbo/140842d1428126437-1-4t-used-oil-analysis-thread-cebtanalysis.png

If you recall, he was seeing some metal shavings/filings in the oil for the the past few oil changes. We decided to have an analysis sent in so we can see what that metal was. Polaris didn't come up with anything.

The old oil sat in a container for 1-2 weeks before a sample was extracted and sent to the lab. The jug was shaken prior to a sample being taken out, but I don't know if that affected anything. Generally speaking, it is advised to fill the sample bottle either through the dipstick tube with a pump or half way through an oil drain when changing oil. Another sample will be taken a few oil changes from now using that method, so we will see if that shows anything different.

Otherwise, the analysis looks good. No fuel dilution, no abnormal wear, and the viscosity held up.
 

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Got the oil analysis back from Cruze. I probably should have expected this result, as I forgot how long ago I had changed the oil. Mileage is 15,622 miles and age is 18 months. This was using the AMSOIL EA bypass filter, but was my first time using AMSOIL in this car. Previous oil change was Valvoline SynPower, so the next analysis should look a bit better.

Everything is clear except for TBN (you can ignore Boron as that is influenced by contaminants). TBN is total base number, which refers to the oil's ability to neutralize acidity. TBN is considered depleted when it goes below 1.0, but AMSOIL recommends changing once it goes below 2.0. I'm at 1.84. Not depleted, but it's low enough to warrant a change as there isn't much left.

Total life on this oil ended up at 15,622 miles. However, I exceeded the 1 year recommendation due to having an extra quart and bypass filtration. The oil was put in on 12/21/13, and was changed on 6/19/15. That's 1.5 years on the same oil change, and 1.5x as long as AMSOIL recommends going. Not a single one of the wear metals was flagged as noteworthy. Viscosity held and even thickened just a hair from 10.5 to 10.8.

This was on Signature Series 0W-30. I've changed it with Signature Series 5W-30. The bypass filter was drained and re-filled with new oil, but not changed. Based on this oil analysis, I could keep doing the same thing I've been doing for as long as I keep my car. I'll report back in 1.5 years with another analysis report, unless I hit another 15k miles before then.
 

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Another with AMSOIL Signature Series 5W-30. This was CEBT's car. Sample 1 was Mobil 1 at 6066 miles, Sample 2 was AMSOIL Signature Series at 15,150 miles. This is all highway driving. Engine had 333,000 miles at the end of that drain.
 

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"This is all highway driving. Engine had 333,000 miles at the end of that drain."

Really - they got 333,000 miles on their cruze? wow - good to see that kind of mileage.
 

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Got another oil analysis in from someone who drives their card like ****.

Driving conditions go beyond severe service. Daily revs to 7,000 RPM, Trifecta tuned, ported intake. This would be considered extreme service. Oil was run for 15,684 miles and 7 months with AMSOIL Signature Series 5W-30.

As usual, a brief explanation of the flagged items. I'll just copy and paste what I provided in our FB group:

OAI/Polaris is conservative on their flagged items and errs on the side of caution. Flagged levels 0 through 3 indicate oil is suitable for continued use. Flagged level 4 indicates oil should be changed if not already done so, or there is a problem somewhere. In this particular case, AMSOIL has specified to OAI/Polaris where to flag the TBN level. TBN is the reserve capacity of the oil to neutralize acids as part of its detergent package. Above 2.0, OAI/Polaris recommends an additional 3500 miles or 3 months of use. Below 2.0, OAI/Polaris recommends the oil be changed. The additive is not considered depleted until it reaches 1.0. In this case, despite being flagged as critical, the oil was still doing its job and could have continued to do so for quite a while longer as TBN came in at 1.92.

Boron is flagged due to the infrared technology used to scan for it being "clouded" by oil contaminants. The additive doesn't actually deplete.

Silicon is contamination from dust. This rises linearly with mileage and is not uncommon to find at higher levels at at 15k mile interval, but this particular sample was higher than usual. The cause for this was a CX Racing intake where the filter media separated from the base and allowed un-filtered air to enter the intake until it was replaced. Yes, folks, poor filtration shows up on oil analysis reports as the contaminants slip past piston rings and enter the oil.

Viscosity increased from 10.4 to 11.9 cSt at 212F, which nears the thicker end of the 30 weight scale, but is still a 30 weight oil and therefore wasn't flagged. This was caused by the oil's oxidation under extremely hard driving conditions, which Nick can describe in further detail. This is contrary to what you usually see in mineral based oils, which shear (thin) when exposed to extreme conditions.

Actual wear metals were so low, they aren't worth discussing. Nothing is flagged.
 

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