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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, I purchased a 2011 cruze at the beginning of this month. I got an engine light driving it home from the lot. It was an 1101 code. So far the car has been brought back twice now and they "fix" it. And the light comes right back with in an hour or so of driving. This last time they cleared the code and said "hopefully you can get a inspections sticker before it comes back on". LOL , ok so apparently there are 3 sensors involved with this alarm. The way it was explained to my wife (she spent 3 hours at dealership this last time) was that each individual sensor is within the accepted range but when they are all added up they are not. And that might be what is causing the alarm. Having a background in precision machining components, I know what tolerance stack is but...Does this make any sense? In any case, I am not interested in just clearing the code to get a sticker, so what do you do when the dealership itself cant figure out the problem?

I have searched the forums for this code and read all the threads. BTW, the intake manifold and valve cover has already been replaced on this vehicle.

tia,
Tim
 

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Tim-

It would help to know what engine and transmission you have. Is this a 1.4L?

Do they give you a receipt with any information when you bring it back to them? That may give some direction as to what they are doing.

I don't have access to codes right now, but give everyone a few days.

Here's a tread on it. It looks like possibly any air leak into the engine may cause P1101?

http://www.cruzetalk.com/forum/9-general-discussion/11423-p1101-cel-2.html

You mentioned the shop replaced the valve cover and the intake? Did this code come back right after leaving the shop?

This one appears to be difficult to find. Leaks at the valve cover, and a dirty intake Mass Air Flow sensor could be a problem, was the mass Air flow sensor replaced as part of the intake?

What part numbers were replaced on your invoice? That will help us.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Carbon,

Yes this is a 1.4L ECO model, manual trans.

I finally got a hold of the service history. These are the only numbers I have to go on.
in 2014
intake exhuast valve - 4061910
camshaft replacement cover 4060930
harness wrap - z2602-12081

2015:
piston stuff - 4066890
intake manifold - 4060450
coolannt level - 9100747-n140417
turbo charger - 4068290

2016:
turbo boost sensor3.682 - 55576223

The powertrain warranty is up this july.

My wife and I both really like this vehichle. It is fun to drive and the transmission and gear ratios is kinda unique so we would really like to keep it. This car has only 36K miles on it BTW.
I did ask them to check the MAF but they made no note of that.
 

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Wow-

I've been on the forum for nearly 5 years, and I haven't seen this much work done. Looks like this could have been one of the early 2011's that were known to have piston issues.

It looks like they addressed that.

The only thing I can think of in the short term is to get a dealer to acknowledge the issue in writing that this issue was brought up before the expiration of powertrain, so that you have something to go back to GM with for warranty.

Given the issue's you've had, I would contact the GM Customer Service adviser here on the forum. I would have them set up your dealership visit, and have them follow through to see that it's fixed and documented.

The search bar is near the top of the page, and if you even google cruzetalk GM Customer Care I believe you will find it.

Send them your name, VIN and contact information. You've had a lot of issues with this, and it shouldn't be your job to track it down as I think this code is going to be a hard one to find.
 

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Assuming this is a "P" code. From the shop manual: Is a B type code so when the condition that caused this code should automatically reset the CEL. So why is the measured airflow greater than the throttle position sensor. One quick guess, the MAF is a bit scummy and reading high, can be cleaned with a little denatured alcohol. Using other than the complete stock air clean can cause problems like this.

"DTC P1101: Intake Air Flow System Performance

Circuit/System Description

The engine control module (ECM) compares actual airflow based on throttle position (TP) to a calculated airflow based on manifold absolute pressure (MAP) sensor, and mass air flow (MAF).

Conditions for Running the DTC

DTC P0068


  • The engine speed is at least 800 RPM.
  • The ignition voltage is at least 6.4 V.
  • The DTC runs continuously when the above conditions are met.
DTC P1101



  • DTC P0102, P0103, P0107, P0111, P0112, P0113, P0116, P0117, P0118, P0335,or P0336 is not set
  • The engine speed is between 400-7,000 RPM
  • The engine coolant temperature (ECT) is between -7 to +125°C (+19 to +257°F).
  • The intake air temperature (IAT) is between -20 to +125°C (-4 to +257°F).
  • The DTC runs continuously when the above conditions are met.
Conditions for Setting the DTCs

The ECM detects that the actual airflow rate is greater than the calculated airflow.

Action Taken When the DTCs Set



  • DTC P0068 is a type A DTC.
  • DTC P1101 is a type B DTC.
Conditions for Clearing the DTCs



  • DTC P0068 is a type A DTC.
  • DTC P1101 is a type B DTC.
Reference Information
Schematic Reference


Engine Controls Schematics See: Diagrams\Electrical\Powertrain Management\System Diagram

Connector End View Reference

Component Connector End Views See: Diagrams\Connector Views

Electrical Information Reference



DTC Type Reference

Powertrain Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) Type Definitions See: Diagnostic Trouble Code Descriptions\Powertrain Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) Type Definitions

Scan Tool Reference

Control Module References See: Testing and Inspection\Programming and Relearning\Control Module Referencesfor scan tool information

Circuit/System Verification



  1. Ignition ON, verify that DTC DTC P0641, P0651, P0697, or P06A3 is not set.
-->If none of the DTCs are set
Refer to DTC P0641, P0651, P0697, or P06A3 for further diagnosis. See: P Code Charts



  • If the DTC is not set

  1. Ignition ON, verify the scan tool Throttle Body Idle Airflow Compensation parameter is less than 90 %.
-->If 90 % or greater
Refer to Throttle Body Inspection and Cleaning.



  • If less than 90 %

  1. Verify the scan tool TP Sensors 1 and 2 Agree/Disagree parameter displays Agree while performing the Throttle Sweep Test with a scan tool.
-->If Disagree
Refer to DTC P0121-P0123, P0222, P0223, or P2135 See: P0121for further diagnosis.



  • If Agree

  1. Determine the current vehicle testing altitude.
  2. Verify the scan tool MAP Sensor pressure parameter is within the range specified in the Altitude Versus Barometric Pressure table. See: Powertrain Management\Computers and Control Systems\Specifications\Altitude Versus Barometric Pressure
-->If the MAP Sensor parameter is not in range
Refer to DTC P0106 See: P0106for further diagnosis.



  • If the MAP Sensor parameter is within range

  1. Verify the scan tool Boost Pressure Sensor parameter is within the range specified in the Altitude Versus Barometric Pressure table. See: Powertrain Management\Computers and Control Systems\Specifications\Altitude Versus Barometric Pressure
-->If the Boost Pressure Sensor parameter is not in range
Refer to DTC P0236 See: P0236for further diagnosis.



  • If the Boost Pressure Sensor parameter is within range

  1. Verify the scan tool Boost Pressure Sensor parameter decreases after starting the engine.
-->If the Boost Pressure Sensor parameter does not decrease
Refer to DTC P0236 See: P0236for further diagnosis.



  • If the Boost Pressure Sensor parameter is within range

  1. Engine idling, verify the scan tool MAP Sensor pressure parameter is between 26-52 kPa (3.8-7.5 psi) and changes with accelerator pedal input.
-->If not between 26-52 kPa (3.8-7.5 psi) or does not change
Refer to DTC P0106 See: P0106for further diagnosis.



  • If between 26-52 kPa (3.8-7.5 psi) and changes

  1. Verify the scan tool MAF Sensor g/s parameter changes smoothly and gradually as the engine speed is increased and decreased while performing the actions listed below.
9.1Engine idling
9.2Perform the scan tool snapshot function.
9.3Increase the engine speed slowly to 3,000 RPM and then back to idle.
9.4Exit from the scan tool snapshot and review the data.
9.5Observe the MAF Sensor parameter frame by frame with a scan tool.
-->If the MAF Sensor parameter does not change smoothly and gradually
Refer to DTC P0101 See: P0101for further diagnosis.



  • If the MAF Sensor parameter changes smoothly and gradually

  1. Operate the vehicle within the Conditions for Running the DTC. You may also operate the vehicle within the conditions that you observed from the Freeze Frame/Failure Records data.
  2. Verify a DTC does not set.
-->If any DTC sets
Refer to Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) List See: Diagnostic Trouble Code Descriptions\Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) List - Vehicle- Vehicle for further diagnosis.



  • If no DTCs set

  1. All OK
Repair Instructions

Perform the Diagnostic Repair Verification See: Verification Testsafter completing the repair."
 

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LOL , ok so apparently there are 3 sensors involved with this alarm. The way it was explained to my wife (she spent 3 hours at dealership this last time) was that each individual sensor is within the accepted range but when they are all added up they are not.
tia,
Tim
Simple solution.......tell them to replace ALL 3 sensors and see what they say.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Nick, I assume that is an SOP from GM for this type of problem? Thanks for that info I can see why it might take hours to figure it out.

I guess what I am having trouble understanding about all this is probably an elementary type of thing. I am under the impression that sensors indicate when there is a problem. How does replacing a sensor fix the problem? Ok, I suppose a sensor itself may "go bad" but clearly when the same alarm is triggered after replacing the sensor then its not a bad sensor.

Sorry if I didnt make this clear but I just purchased this vehicle through a used car dealer. I havnt even gotten my initial inspection sticker yet. My used car dealer sent it to the chevy dealer to be fixed under warranty. I picked the car up and theres that engine light again. So this time we went directly to the chevy dealership rather than waste time going through my dealer. That is how we got all the service history of the car.
 

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Timos-

What Nick posted is from an Online service manual that GM uses for diagnostics. Do you have any recourse with the used car seller? I'm not saying stuff can't be fixed, but as you learned from your service history it appears that there have been a lot of issues with this car.

Hoepfully you can get everything addressed in the time frame of the powertrain warranty and this car isn't something someone else was trying to unload..
 
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Am an old broken down engineer, working with both military and consumer vehicle type diagnostic systems. Military uses a second sensor for reference, the diagnostic systems in our consumer grade vehicles are only good for determining if a sensor is completely opened, no connectivity, or a dead short circuit.

But you can also run into sensors that are out of tolerance and this appears to be your problem.

I really appreciate my Honda and Toyota shop manuals, they have one section that shows all the sensors with an index. And shows not only the specifications, but the accepted tolerances as well.

An easy ones are the air intake or engine coolant temperature sensors, shows either a chart or a graph as to how their resistances vary with temperature, but does help to have an environmental chamber and an accurate ohmmeter to test these out. MAPs are not difficult either, its either output frequency or voltage versus the input vacuum in inches of Hg. Just use a hand vacuum pump for the inlet, need a 12 volt power supply and something to measure the voltage or the frequency. You know if they meet specifications this is not the problem. And willing to bet your dealer does not have this equipment, just guessing.

Most difficult is the MAF sensor, mass air flow sensor, here output voltage varies with air flow, measuring air flow is the problem. The greater the airflow the greater the output voltage, most of these output between 1 to 4,5 volts.

MAP is a very simple to manufacturer sensor, just two pieces of nichrome wire, one is the reference buried, other is exposed to the air flow. Both have a heating current applied, as the airflow increases across the exposed element, absorbs more heat, thus the resistance and and current following decrease that is compared to the reference sensor. This generates a proportional output voltage going through a cheap differential amplifier. But you don't know this compared to what they want for a replacement.

If the exposed element is coated, won't get as cold like with increased air flow and will read lower showing a higher air flow rate. Vast majority of these can be cleaned, but as a dealer, you don't make money this way so just replace it.

More confident information, okay sue me, while we provided full specifications for all these sensors, GM attorneys don't like to publicized it because of warranty claims so just say to replace it with a known good sensor. Kind of stupid, how do you know if a sensor is good or bad if you don't know the test specifications?

Depending on your state, all new or used vehicle dealers have to provide a vehicle that can pass emission requirements. And regardless of the cause, a check engine lamp on will not pass. They can also check history codes with a better scanner, another failure they look at.

Another possibility is the throttle body sensor itself, a potentiometer that has a specific resistance versus angular rotation and can be checked with an ohmmeter. This tells the computer are far that vane is opened.

Ha, with a guy that knows all this stuff, can be tested quicker than typing it.

Kind of go along with Vetterin, have your dealer replace all of them.
 
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