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150K Miles in a 2014 Cruze Diesel

13413 Views 39 Replies 19 Participants Last post by  jblackburn
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So, I have made another major milestone in my 2014 Chevy Cruze Diesel, 150,000 miles. I have previously posted my experience through 50K and 100K

Here: http://www.cruzetalk.com/forum/64-c...iscussion/56962-50000-miles-cruze-diesel.html

And Here: http://www.cruzetalk.com/forum/64-c...7-100k-miles-2014-chevrolet-cruze-diesel.html

This review will pretty much be from the 100K point to the present. Other than normal maintenance items such as a timing belt and rear brake pads at 145K miles, nothing needed replacing during the period from 100K to 150K miles. It continues to be a reliable, comfortable, fuel efficient and powerful (for what it is) car. It still runs and drives just like the day it did when I picked it up with 55 miles on the clock. The car remains rattle and squeak free, the seats still look new, the suspension is still tight and supple. That being said, the timing belt tensioner (or something in that belt system) did start to whine a couple thousand miles before I had the timing belt replaced, but I do not consider that an “issue” since I went almost 50,000 miles past when I was supposed to change the timing belt.

I did say that nothing needed to be replaced from 100K to 150K but I did have a couple issues, which I file under the “learning experience” category. I am a bit biased on this car admittedly, so there will be some who read what I am about to say and take it more negatively than I did, but I will state the facts, what I learned, and most importantly how others can prevent it from happening to them,

At about 115K and again at 131K, I got a CEL (Check Engine Light) and a message that my DPF was full and to keep driving, immediately followed by a Power Reduced message. I got very lucky in that both times I was able to drive it straight to the dealership for a manual DPF (Diesel Particulate Filter) regeneration. After it happened the first time, I got an aftermarket gauge to monitor certain parameters of the car, namely:

“Regen Status” (Indicates when there is a regen of the DPF to burn off accumulated soot)

“Soot Grams” (Indicates how many grams of soot have accumulated in the DPF)

“Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP)” (Indicates turbo boost – or vacuum. 14.0 is the equivalent to zero boost. Anything under that is vacuum).

After I got the monitor (well, two monitors, but we can ignore the first one) - called a Scangauge II (it’s documented thoroughly on this forum) – I thought I was free and clear, but not so much. One day, I observed that my grams of soot were up to 22, higher than the usual 19 grams that trigger a regen, but I thought nothing of it. I also noticed that the MAP had dropped well below 14 before I shut the car off, but the Regen Indicator said there was none in progress. When I shut the car off, the soot grams went from 22 to 35 immediately. When I started the car the next time, I had the dreaded “Power Reduced” message and CEL again.

Here’s what happens. There’s about a 30 second window in which the car starts gearing up for a regen and this is indicated by MAP below 14, but the Regen Indicator is not on yet. I believe the car has started the process of injecting fuel in to the DPF to heat it up, but it’s not hot enough to start burning the soot off at this point, and as such it gets clogged if you shut the car off during this 30 second (or so) window. The solution is to never shut the car off when both the Regen Indicator is off AND the MAP is below 14. (Or for those of you who prefer to monitor turbo boost – it will turn to a negative number)

Hopefully I haven’t lost you there. The downside to this is that you will need to buy a gauge ($120-ish) to monitor this, and it is considerably cheaper than the cost of one manual regen ($250-ish). Should you have to do this? NO, but it is what it is. Maybe the engineers will figure out a way around this in the next go-around, or at least figure a way to alert the driver.

Odds are pretty good this won’t ever happen to you. It took 115K miles for it to happen to me, and I am glad it did because now I have a clear understanding (I think) of what happened and am able to help others prevent it. If you do have this message, you probably can’t drive much further than 50-100 miles without damaging the DPF. Since then, that particular set of circumstances has not presented itself and all the emissions components have been working well. I am averaging 800-1000 miles in between regen cycles lately.

Now that that’s all out of the way, I can go on raving about the car. I never in a million years imagined I would still have this car after 150K miles and now looking forward to the 200K mark. I love this car as much as I did the day I test drove it, and simply find it very engaging and fun to drive every day. I continue to be thoroughly impressed with the engineering and build quality of this car – all aspects – but especially the powertrain. I am at a point now where I can see this being a good and reliable car for hundreds of thousands of miles. Of course time will tell, but I am still in the game and on my way to 200K as a daily driver and we shall see where it goes from there.
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Diesel, great write up. I'm closing in on the 100000 mile mark myself. 98000. I'm hoping to have the same luck as you have.
I did see you had to take it to the dealer for a manual regen. Did I read this right, 250.00 to do this? SMH..I drive a semi and they all have factory switch's to do a manual regen. They switch will only work if it calls for a regen. Seems to me that's a high cost for a safety feature. My I ask what does the dealer do for a manual regen?
The reason I'm asking is because my semi , if I do a manual regen just goes into a high idle mode for a set period then finishes . if that is all the dealer does is over ride the computer to do this that is a rip off.
I understand not letting the customer being able to do this because someone will park it in a garage and do a regen but 250.00, should be one a set period per year at no cost. Well my rant is over on this.
Again great write up again, I'll give one on my 100000 mile mark. Hope to see one at 200000 from you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Diesel, great write up. I'm closing in on the 100000 mile mark myself. 98000. I'm hoping to have the same luck as you have.
I did see you had to take it to the dealer for a manual regen. Did I read this right, 250.00 to do this? SMH..I drive a semi and they all have factory switch's to do a manual regen. They switch will only work if it calls for a regen. Seems to me that's a high cost for a safety feature. My I ask what does the dealer do for a manual regen?
The reason I'm asking is because my semi , if I do a manual regen just goes into a high idle mode for a set period then finishes . if that is all the dealer does is over ride the computer to do this that is a rip off.
I understand not letting the customer being able to do this because someone will park it in a garage and do a regen but 250.00, should be one a set period per year at no cost. Well my rant is over on this.
Again great write up again, I'll give one on my 100000 mile mark. Hope to see one at 200000 from you.
I fully agree with you on the manual regen. $200+ is a ripoff since I am pretty sure they hook it up to a computer, punch a few keys and then let the car sit until it's done. I think they are charging me because the car is taking up one of the bays and the mechanic is supposedly keeping an eye on it. It wasn't really a huge deal to me because that dealership has always done me right in the service department, but I would much prefer a manual regen option. I am glad it happened though, because I was finally able to figure it out and hopefully help others. I fully intend to drive it as a daily driver to 200K and likely beyond. I would like to see you do a 100K write up once you hit that milestone.
 

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Let us know if you figure out how to. I would buy one for that.
I'll let you know when I get a chance hopefully this weekend. Just so you know my snap on scanner was $5500 so may not be the kind of thing you want to actually purchase. However I live in Canada so may be a bit cheaper down there.
 

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I recently puchased a 15 Cruze diesel, it has like 5300 miles on it. Recently purchased the scangauge II, great tool but have a couple questions.

1) if one didn't have a scangauge and have some idea when it is suppose to do a regen, if you turn off your car during a regen what happens?

2) I have 20 grams of soot, does it normally start regen around 22?

3) if one drives more city driving does that generate more soot and shorter regen cycles than highway driving?
 

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Wish a scangauge 2 wasn't $350 in Canada :(
Send me a private message, I would be happy to get you one and ship it to you. I didn't pay anything close to that. No I am not a dealer, I just buy and sell stuff.
 

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I recently puchased a 15 Cruze diesel, it has like 5300 miles on it. Recently purchased the scangauge II, great tool but have a couple questions.

1) if one didn't have a scangauge and have some idea when it is suppose to do a regen, if you turn off your car during a regen what happens?

2) I have 20 grams of soot, does it normally start regen around 22?

3) if one drives more city driving does that generate more soot and shorter regen cycles than highway driving?

Ive only had 1 Regen, but from reading it's not a good idea to turn car off during Regen , particularly at the very beginning when MAP goes below 14 ( pre-regen).

my regen started 7 miles into a soot reading of 22. Except for @diesel, most guys Regen at about 22. This is also my experience.

Ive noticed more soot build up in city driving than highway on the Scan Gauge. This may also be a function of the B11 I run here in IL though.

Note, it only took 10 minutes or about 10 miles driving to complete a Regen, so you're better off just letting it finish, even if at idle like the semis do.
 
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Nice. I will watch for later updates on this car. One thing I am most interested in is how long before the dpf has to be replaced. With semis they have a limit with miles (iirc MB has the ecm set a code around 400k that the dpf NEEDS to be pulled and cleaned) The soot built up in the dpf will leave behind an ash that after so long plugs it up, as I said tho, on semis we can pull them off and clean them out provided they pass a couple tests. But with automotive they don't make the dpf serviceable, so when the limit is reached you remove it and install a new one. Also, you stated about fuel being injected to get the dpf up to temp, mostly they need exhaust temps to reach a certain level before the fuel will start to be injected.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Nice. I will watch for later updates on this car. One thing I am most interested in is how long before the dpf has to be replaced. With semis they have a limit with miles (iirc MB has the ecm set a code around 400k that the dpf NEEDS to be pulled and cleaned) The soot built up in the dpf will leave behind an ash that after so long plugs it up, as I said tho, on semis we can pull them off and clean them out provided they pass a couple tests. But with automotive they don't make the dpf serviceable, so when the limit is reached you remove it and install a new one. Also, you stated about fuel being injected to get the dpf up to temp, mostly they need exhaust temps to reach a certain level before the fuel will start to be injected.
I will probably be the first on this forum to discover how long the DPF lasts, but I can say I still get 900-1000 miles between regens with 153K miles on the car.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
I recently puchased a 15 Cruze diesel, it has like 5300 miles on it. Recently purchased the scangauge II, great tool but have a couple questions.

1) if one didn't have a scangauge and have some idea when it is suppose to do a regen, if you turn off your car during a regen what happens?

2) I have 20 grams of soot, does it normally start regen around 22?

3) if one drives more city driving does that generate more soot and shorter regen cycles than highway driving?
Others have answered some of your questions, but I will give my 2 cents. I posted a sticky that tells you what happens if you shut your car off during the "pre-regen". Shutting off during the regen won't hurt a thing. I've done it many times. You will hear the car's fans stay on after you shut it off if you interrupt a regen.

I am not sure why mine regens at 19 and everybody else's does it at 22. It's strange.

Definitely city driving produces more soot. So does cold start and stop driving.
 

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Yesterday I had my first regen since having scan gauge and it was a few miles after it 22 grams of soot and had driven like 740 miles since last regen. Well had I not had the scan gauge I would have turned the car off just as the map started to drop and go into regen, I kept driving for several minutes and it completed the regen pretty quickly. I was in town so it had some stop and go involved. I doubt it would have been a major problem but it provided a peace of mind knowing what is happening.

For part of the regen I was in a parking lot and it appeared the regen stopped briefly because of speed I guess then once I got going again it finished the regen. I assume this is normal?
 

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I will probably be the first on this forum to discover how long the DPF lasts, but I can say I still get 900-1000 miles between regens with 153K miles on the car.
Sounds like your regen process is working very well. Any idea what a DPF cost to replace if they do go bad outside of warranty? I looked on a gm parts website and couldn't find the part listed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 · (Edited)
Yesterday I had my first regen since having scan gauge and it was a few miles after it 22 grams of soot and had driven like 740 miles since last regen. Well had I not had the scan gauge I would have turned the car off just as the map started to drop and go into regen, I kept driving for several minutes and it completed the regen pretty quickly. I was in town so it had some stop and go involved. I doubt it would have been a major problem but it provided a peace of mind knowing what is happening.

For part of the regen I was in a parking lot and it appeared the regen stopped briefly because of speed I guess then once I got going again it finished the regen. I assume this is normal?
Don't worry about interrupting the regen when the RGN is 1. You will be safe there. You just don't want to do with with RGN=0 and MAP below 14. And yes. The RGN will go to 0 when you are driving slowly and the temps drop. It will resume once you get the RPMs up again. And come to think of it, probably the only danger area is when the regen first starts. Once it's underway and the RGN goes back to 0, you are likely fine to shut off the car. The only time I ever had a problem was before the RGN ever went to 1.

Sounds like your regen process is working very well. Any idea what a DPF cost to replace if they do go bad outside of warranty? I looked on a gm parts website and couldn't find the part listed.
I think the part alone is $1000. Not cheap at all. But I am optimistic it will last indefinitely though.
 

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FTI. I am at 171000 mi and am now having dpf filter replaced along w some other things. My timing belt was replaced at 100000 for $425 labor 67 parts. They had to order 2/3 special tools to replace it I had thought of replacing it myself until I saw how bad a job it looked to be.
 

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FTI. I am at 171000 mi and am now having dpf filter replaced along w some other things. My timing belt was replaced at 100000 for $425 labor 67 parts. They had to order 2/3 special tools to replace it I had thought of replacing it myself until I saw how bad a job it looked to be.
Just curious - what led to it needing to be replaced? Failed regens? Persistent CEL emissions codes?
 
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