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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello fellow Cruisers looking for some help . I brought my cruze in today for an oil change at Tires Plus. When they gave the car back to me they told me I had three separate leaks.

(W0133-1898144)Oil pan gasket which they said it was a just a slight leak-recommend

(vs50807r)Valve cover gasket which they said was slight as well. - recommend

(To1016) Eng var timing solenoid remove and replace variable timing control actuator both -required *what is this?*

What's an Eng car timing solenoid?

Are any of these covered under the 100K warranty?
 

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What year was your car first put into service? If 2012 you might be out of warranty based on years...??
 

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The variable timing solenoid is an actuator used to vary the camshaft rotation that controls when the valves that let intake air and exhaust gasses out of the engine. By having variable cam timing and being able to fine-tune when the valves in the cylinder head open and close the engine computer can adjust their opening for better power and emissions under specific driving conditions.

The variable cam timing system works off engine oil pressure. There is a solenoid (valve) that controls how much pressure is applied to an actuator built into the camshaft's drive sprocket. When the timing chain driven off the spinning crankshaft turns the camshaft drive sprocket, the variable actuator can advance or retard (i.e. move ahead clockwise or retard counter-clcockwise) the camshaft a certain number of degrees rotation in either direction. Engines with fixed camshaft timing (i.e. the camshaft rotation never varies and is tied directly to the crankshaft movement) don't have this actuator and instead just use a regular sprocket.

Because the variable cam timing system used oil pressure to control the actuator to adjust cam timing, if the control solenoid (that controls amount of oil pressure) or the actual solenoid leaks you might have to replace something as simple as an o-ring seal or the entire component to correct a leak. Depending on the mileage and how old the car is it might be covered under a powertrain warranty. Since this sounds like an independent oil change type place and some of these repairs could cost a fair amount of money, it might be wise to get a second opinion. If the car is under warranty a dealer might be best.

Lets say you do have a minor leak. If its just a small sign of oil weeping out and it isn't building up it might not be worth the effort to repair unless it gets worse. Again that's something a second opinion might help guide you on how important it is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
thank you for all the replies everyone

PCv valve too? I just read the link you sent. do I understand correctly If I bring my car to Chevy and get the three leaks fixed and the PCV valve is failing all the leaks will come back again? Will they automatically check this knowing it could be the cause or should I check it before I even bring it in. I do notice a rough idle sometimes. I was thinking it was the spark plugs but maybe it's this considering. I also always thought my MPG was a little low I get 25.9 on the odometer.
Can a PCV valve damage the turbo? I only have 52000 miles. I just had the turbo replaced a few months back check engine light was coming on..
 

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What was the diagnosis on the failed turbo? Was there physical damage to the wheels and/or rotating assembly or was it "burning" or leaking oil? If the PCV system were completely failed and blocked and allowing the crankcase (lower end of engine and oil pan) to pressurize, that pressurization would also impact the valvetrain area and turbo's center section (where the bearings are located) because the drain back passages from the top end of the engine and the drain tube for the turbo connect to the crankcase.

If the turbo was replaced due to smoking it's possible the turbocharger's center section could be pressurized and then force some of the oil out past the seals into turbine wheel and into the exhaust side where it would burn and cause smoke. If it leaked out the compressor side into the intake tract you'd likely see signs of oil on the compressor wheel and building up in the intake tract.

If the turbo was starved for oil and damaged the shaft the spinning wheels rotate on or there was damage to the wheels ("fans" blades) from a mechanical cause its less likely the PCV was the main cause but could have contributed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
He Chevy guy thanks again for your help. Just want to make sure I understand correctly. The orange pink nipple check valve all I'm supposed to do is look and see if it's there? If it's there I'm good and if it's not there it needs to be fixed?

If the PCV regulator is not sucking air or hissing do I still have to check the check valve nipple?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I checked the PCV valve regulator no hissing or sucking air so I'm good there I haven't checked the nipple part yet I'm nervous about pulling off that clamp remember one time on a mower I had I had a lot of trouble getting a C-clamp back on . nowadays I have carpal tunnel and tennis elbow so I'm a little nervous. I made an appointment for Chevy next week I still have a year left on my 100K warranty
 
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