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It's that time of year again. You go outside, see your breath in the air, get in your car, and realize your engine takes forever to get heat blowing through the vents.

Fortunately, there's a solution, and for all you new people that haven't heard of it, it's called AMSOIL Coolant Boost. I make one promotional thread every year for it, and this is it. Note: Coolant Boost has been reformulated since last year and is even more effective.

This product uses surfectants to improve the thermal transfer between your coolant and metal surfaces, which means it pulls heat away from your engine faster and transfers it through your heater core faster so you aren't freezing down the road on cold mornings.

The only drawback is your engine takes longer to get to full operating temp, but for anyone who has had to drive the Cruze in sub-freezing temperatures, you'll gladly take faster heat in the cabin.

One 16-oz bottle treats 16 quarts of antifreeze. Our 1.4T has 5.8 quarts, so one bottle gives you enough coolant boost for two vehicles. Add coolant boost once per year or every 30,000 miles, whichever comes first.

AMSOIL Coolant Boost is safe with all coolants, including Dexcool. Members of CruzeTalk have been using it for years without any adverse effects, and significantly improved warm-up times.

Order from the AMSOIL website: AMSOIL Dominator® Coolant Boost

 

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The only drawback is your engine takes longer to get to full operating temp
I was interested until I read that bit. I'm not sure if that would be the best thing for the Diesel Cruze as it needs to be at full operating temp to perform the regen cycle. It barely got to it last winter during the super cold mornings.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I was interested until I read that bit. I'm not sure if that would be the best thing for the Diesel Cruze as it needs to be at full operating temp to perform the regen cycle. It barely got to it last winter during the super cold mornings.
I probably wouldn't use it in the diesel as it might take TOO long for it to warm up, plus you don't have that issue with your electric assisted heater.
 

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I probably wouldn't use it in the diesel as it might take TOO long for it to warm up, plus you don't have that issue with your electric assisted heater.
I never actually read into that but my friend always commented how quickly my car warms up compared to his gas Cruze. I guess that is why, haha.
 

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Is this similar to Redline Waterwetter?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Is this similar to Redline Waterwetter?
Sort of, but different. I forget where, but last I heard, it works a bit differently. I'm not all that familiar with how this particular is formulated, only how it works and the results people are getting using it.
 

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Given the efficiency improvements it makes me wonder why OEMs don't use it.

Think about the weight savings of decreasing the radiator and heater core by 10% alone. Nevermind the packaging benefits that would afford.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Given the efficiency improvements it makes me wonder why OEMs don't use it.

Think about the weight savings of decreasing the radiator and heater core by 10% alone. Nevermind the packaging benefits that would afford.
I would assume it's because it's a product that loses its effectiveness after 30,000 miles or 1 year and needs to be re-applied.
 
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