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Discussion Starter #1
My 100 mile/day commute has me going over some pretty good grades. Has anyone used a slotted/drilled/cryo rotor they care to endorse? I don't really want to put rotors on every year.
 

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I have heard awesome things about cryo rotors. No personal experience, but what I've heard is awesome.

I'm going to try the hawk sector 27 kit probably once my stocks are gone. Something about rotors matched to pads works for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
15% grades?
I dont' recall what the signs say the grade is, but on the largest mountain I go from ~7k feet down to roughly 4500 ft in 15 miles. I have three grades similar. I have an ECO MT but even in 4th at 70mph I need to use brakes to maintain speed.
 

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I dont' recall what the signs say the grade is, but on the largest mountain I go from ~7k feet down to roughly 4500 ft in 15 miles. I have three grades similar. I have an ECO MT but even in 4th at 70mph I need to use brakes to maintain speed.
<4% grade
 

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Discussion Starter #10
It is steeper than 4%, only about half of the 15 miles is a steep grade, the rest is a slow drop. I can't find any info online about it, but it's Parley's Summit in Utah.
 

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A brake rotor that has been cryo treated.... think of it like a deep freeze. It is supposed to change the molecular structure of the metal in a good way! -in laymens terms
I would be interested in details as far as durability and possibly warpage.
They probably use liquid nitrogen. It's inexpensive and readily available.
LN2=-320*F or 77K
 

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I would be interested in details as far as durability and possibly warpage.
They probably use liquid nitrogen. It's inexpensive and readily available.
LN2=-320*F or 77K
I know in the performance world some guys will run cryo treated rears especially on cars like the cts-vs.
 

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It is steeper than 4%, only about half of the 15 miles is a steep grade, the rest is a slow drop. I can't find any info online about it, but it's Parley's Summit in Utah.
interstates are rarely >6% if thats the route you take

have you tried a/c on? i have seen ppl saying the eco doesnt hold on a downhill, i put my diesel in 3rd and do 65mph downhill

 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
I haven't tried a/c as a means for braking, I would assume that would negate the DFCO which works wonders on elevation changes for me. I will give it a go. And on my way home tonight I'll take not of the grade sign ;)


ps That's a nifty graph, how did you make it?
 

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I haven't tried a/c as a means for braking, I would assume that would negate the DFCO which works wonders on elevation changes for me. I will give it a go. And on my way home tonight I'll take not of the grade sign ;)


ps That's a nifty graph, how did you make it?
Should still DFCO - mine does with AC on.

The compressor will put a bit more of a load on the engine. Eh, it might help.

Honestly, most rotors might be fine and dandy if you had a brake pad that holds up to the heat without baking itself on to the rotor. If you're using the stock brake pads, they suck - I had pad transfer creating high spots on my rotors within 8000 miles.
 

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Unless you have had personal experience with grooved brakes I would hesitate to make this claim. These have been on my Cruze diesel for 9,000km now and they are so much better than the original disks you really can't compare them. On my previous Commodore I had similar disks for 50,000km and they were still working great when I sold the car to buy the Cruze.

View attachment 150330
 

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The strength and resistance to warpage of non-flat rotors is hugely defined by the modification. Something with slots that aren't through the whole rotor are better and will run quieter for day to day use that something with large gouges deep into them.

For your situation, I'd recommend a good set of pads, hawk or what have you and a cryo rotor. Just because the cryo rotors are known to last forever and work very well.
 

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I haven't tried a/c as a means for braking, I would assume that would negate the DFCO which works wonders on elevation changes for me. I will give it a go. And on my way home tonight I'll take not of the grade sign ;)


ps That's a nifty graph, how did you make it?
yeah, it could cost you some mpg...ill throw my jeep into 4wd and put the ac on to save some brakes on the real grades around here, 15% and 18% aint unheard of

google map your route
cut and paste the url into GPS Visualizer profile input form in the spot it says paste url, click the button
 

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I dont' recall what the signs say the grade is, but on the largest mountain I go from ~7k feet down to roughly 4500 ft in 15 miles. I have three grades similar. I have an ECO MT but even in 4th at 70mph I need to use brakes to maintain speed.
Try 3rd gear, good up to around 85 mph before red line and the engine isn't operating under load anyway. Even soft braking for long distances will get those rotors red hot.
 
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