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Seem to be getting by with Torque Pro on my smarter than me smart phone with an iCar bluetooth adapter. Has a power switch on it so can leave it plugged in all the time. Ian Hawkins is updating the program every five minutes. So far the codes are matching what my dealer reads.

With the Harbor Freight thing, think I read you can get computer updates since they change this stuff every five minutes. One thing I do like about Harbor Freight, can return it if you don't like it. Ha, did this more than once.

Care to hear my pet peeves on scanners? If not, stop here.

First thing with OBD I, with a paper clip could read any code, on some, even ABS codes with the ability to reset them. Then the EPA comes along with OBD II starting in the year of 1996, OE's had to follow using the same diagnostic connector, but this is where it stopped. All codes were suppose to be standard, that was tossed out on day one.

All the codes are stored in the ABS, cruise control, BCM, ECM, radio, now electric power steering or whatever, they all go into one really big fat OR gate, so any code will illuminate it. In vehicles like my 88 Supra or my old 92 DeVille, all these codes could be displayed by knowing which buttons to press. With OBD II this became history.

Another very dirty trick the OE's are using is translating codes, so with most generic scanners, you will read a code that is not even in the book. You need that way overpriced OE scanner to read the correct codes. And I feel very strongly that the owner of the vehicle should know exactly why the check engine light is on. Don't know the difference if your gas cap is loose or if your EGR valve is jammed burning up your engine.

To me this is criminal, owners manual says pull over and call your dealer, yeah like on 3:00 AM on a Sunday morning.

With ABS, any manual states that if that light comes on, it will not interfere with normal braking, which is BS by the way. But yet generic scanners refuse to show ABS codes for some liability reason that doesn't make a bit of sense. But its okay for any nitwit to buy and replace any brake parts himself. So what is wrong about showing an ABS code.

Another advantage of an OE scanner is interactive, with this stupid Cruze, the only was to activate the ABS pump for proper bleeding is with a way overpriced scanner., hardly 30 bucks worth of parts in these things.

Just attempts to really kill the even most advanced DIYer.

Why do we, the American buying public put up with this BS?

One thing I loved about electronic engineering it was honest in its own pure natural law way. If I didn't follow all the pure natural laws, that circuit would blow up in my face. It already knows all by itself whether it should work or not. And batting 999.9999 was not good enough, had to be a 1,000, and nothing less.

But with software, you can lie like crazy, and this is exactly what they do.
 

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Last time I checked, years ago, was $1,500 bucks per year per vehicle for a subscription for code. The only reason why this code was available since all this 1996 BS firmware started, claimed it was cheaper than providing a burnt PROM chip, is that independents were complaining about not being able to get it. It was around 1999 that the California supreme court ruled the OE's had to make it available.

Could have used a cheap USB port to reload the code, but no, also required a way overpriced scanner for the interface, and no such thing as a standard, every automotive manufacturer had their own.

A close friend running a small Ford dealership called me because he thought I was some kind of a computer genius because Ford wanted him to pay $43,000 for a specialized computer, Ha, replied may be a genius, but would need to get my hands on it to see if I could reverse engineer it. But apparently enough dealers complained about this so they dropped the price to more of a reasonable 4,500 bucks.


In regards to copyrights, that firmware is completely worthless for any other application that the specific vehicle it was intended for. Each automotive manufacture had over 125 different versions per model year, it also changed from year to year due to EPA regulations.

This is one case where they got us where they want us. A bit curious as to whether that EPA would at least cover a firmware reload under that 1972 80K mile/8 year emission warranty law, but never ran across this. Did find one dealer willing to reflash my RAM for 80 bucks, but didn't have to use it.

Probably the reason why 3 out of my four vehicles are pre-OBD II, never cared to get into bed with any dealer. Not a darn thing on these other vehicles I can't do myself as long as I can still do it.

Was in Best Buy last Christmas, had a Samsung digital camera on sale from 179 bucks down to 129 bucks. Model WB350F to be precise, as soon as I got it home, recharged the battery, switched it on, said WiFi is available, so typed in my password and was connected. Then it said new firmware was available, so I clicked yes and left it.

Not a darn reason why they can't do this with our automobiles, completely self checking and does it right. But I guess they just love to screw us to death, and they are very good at this.
 
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