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Hi. I am trying to locate and access the Body Control Module for a 2011 Chevy Cruze RS. Can anyone provide instructions to locate this part? The car has a lot of odd issues that all seem to tie back to the BCM. I'd like to check the connections for corrosion and clean them, but can't seem to locate the BCM for this car. Thanks in advance!
 

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Behind the behind the dash/center console, on the floor. Pull off the side panel on either the left or right side of the center console and you'll see it. (I recommend the passenger side panel as that is the side the connectors and hold clips are on.)
 

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I guess we will have to search through the pages then for that link for ya .
There is site to download all of the schematics for this car for free ..
I might have Gotten the member incorrect .. Maybe Scphi maybe AARCUDA .. 1 of the early members set it up !

Brian, Did you ever locate this?


OP: This is taken from Complete BCM Pin Diagram and you may want to do the 5 day free thing from Alldata if nothing else. If I can after, work tonight, I will look in my Haynes manual to see if there is a picture.

Edit: I guess I am just a lousy typer and took me too long to answer as you had zero replies when I started.
 

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Thanks. I found it. Just trying to figure out how to pull it out now. Thank you for the quick reply!
 

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Behind the behind the dash/center console, on the floor. Pull off the side panel on either the left or right side of the center console and you'll see it. (I recommend the passenger side panel as that is the side the connectors and hold clips are on.)
Thanks. I found it. Just trying to figure out how to pull it out now. Thank you for the quick reply!
.



Do you recommend disconnecting the battery before cleaning the contacts on the BCM?
 

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No problem, blasirl. I appreciate your help. This car is my 17 year old stepson's car. Given its condition, I expect to need more help in the future, so any info that you can provide is helpful.
 

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If there is corrosion there, you should check for water leaks also. Some '11s were improperly assembled at the plant and lack a shield over the HVAC air inlet. See this link.
 

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If there is corrosion there, you should check for water leaks also. Some '11s were improperly assembled at the plant and lack a shield over the HVAC air inlet. See this link.

There doesn't appear to be any corrosion (unfortunately?). I'm cleaning all of the pins and connections with QD Electronic Cleaner. It was recommended to me to apply dielectric grease to the pins and connectors. I've read conflicting information on this. What is your opinion on that?
 

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The car has a lot of odd issues that all seem to tie back to the BCM.
What kind of issues? Are you aware of the Negative Battery Cable issue? That's everyone's "go-to" for strange electrical problems.

And yes, I'd absolutely disconnect the battery before unplugging things.
 

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It was recommended to me to apply dielectric grease to the pins and connectors. I've read conflicting information on this. What is your opinion on that?
No! Dielectric grease is an insulator. It will insulate the terminals so that they don't conduct electricity.

Most people use it on the spark plug boots to protect against electrical leakage out of the boot, and to make it easier to remove the boot. But don't put it on the electrical connector for the spark plug.

You can put silicone grease on the battery terminals to protect them from corrosion. When you attach the battery terminal, most of the grease will be squeezed out and it will protect the terminal from gases that are emitted from the battery. Also, the battery has high current, which will pass over the very thin film that is left when you tighten the terminal.

But, don't put grease on the BCM electrical connectors, unless you don't want them to work.
 

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Well, I cleaned all of the contacts and applied the dielectric grease. I figured it was worth a try since it should help keep out any moisture. I drove it around for a while and everything is working fine. I'm keeping my fingers crossed that the problems don't resume. Thank you both for your help! Have a great day!
 

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It was recommended to me to apply dielectric grease to the pins and connectors. I've read conflicting information on this. What is your opinion on that?
No! Dielectric grease is an insulator. It will insulate the terminals so that they don't conduct electricity.

Most people use it on the spark plug boots to protect against electrical leakage out of the boot, and to make it easier to remove the boot. But don't put it on the electrical connector for the spark plug.

You can put silicone grease on the battery terminals to protect them from corrosion. When you attach the battery terminal, most of the grease will be squeezed out and it will protect the terminal from gases that are emitted from the battery. Also, the battery has high current, which will pass over the very thin film that is left when you tighten the terminal.

But, don't put grease on the BCM electrical connectors, unless you don't want them to work.
.

Sorry about that. I just saw this comment. The problems we were having were:

Check engine light on - in trying to resolve the check engine light, I put a new gas cap on, then had an oxygen sensor replaced, but the light came back on soon after

Service Stabilitrak alert was on

RPM's were fluctuating

There seemed to be reduced power on acceleration

In my research I found that these all can tie back to the BCM. I also found that it seems to be a common problem with some Chevys. Other people have had numerous sensors replaced, only to have the check engine light come back on and show the code for the same sensor that was just replaced. The only solution I've found online is that the problem is with the connections to the BCM. The design of the part encourages moisture and corrosion. Many people have had success with dielectric grease. My thought is that it helps to keep moisture out of the connections. After I cleaned the pins and connectors, I applied a small amount to the surface of each connector, but did not apply it to the pins since, as you said above, it doesn't conduct electricity so I was concerned that it would make the problem worse. So far, all warning lights are out and the car is running great. There isn't the same fluctuation in RPMs that there was and there isn't any decrease in acceleration. I'm going to give it a while before I can confidently say that it took care of all the problems, but it's looking good so far.
 

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Sorry about that. I just saw this comment. The problems we were having were:

Check engine light on - in trying to resolve the check engine light, I put a new gas cap on, then had an oxygen sensor replaced, but the light came back on soon after

Service Stabilitrak alert was on

RPM's were fluctuating

There seemed to be reduced power on acceleration

In my research I found that these all can tie back to the BCM. I also found that it seems to be a common problem with some Chevys. Other people have had numerous sensors replaced, only to have the check engine light come back on and show the code for the same sensor that was just replaced. The only solution I've found online is that the problem is with the connections to the BCM. The design of the part encourages moisture and corrosion. Many people have had success with dielectric grease. My thought is that it helps to keep moisture out of the connections. After I cleaned the pins and connectors, I applied a small amount to the surface of each connector, but did not apply it to the pins since, as you said above, it doesn't conduct electricity so I was concerned that it would make the problem worse. So far, all warning lights are out and the car is running great. There isn't the same fluctuation in RPMs that there was and there isn't any decrease in acceleration. I'm going to give it a while before I can confidently say that it took care of all the problems, but it's looking good so far.
If the problems return take it to a dealership to have the negative ground cable replaced. What you did was reduce the electrical resistance on the BCM connector. We know the original negative ground cable has a problem with increasing resistance over time.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
If the problems return take it to a dealership to have the negative ground cable replaced. What you did was reduce the electrical resistance on the BCM connector. We know the original negative ground cable has a problem with increasing resistance over time.[/QUOTE]

Thank you. I might just do that anyway.
 

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.

Sorry about that. I just saw this comment. The problems we were having were:

Check engine light on - in trying to resolve the check engine light, I put a new gas cap on, then had an oxygen sensor replaced, but the light came back on soon after

Service Stabilitrak alert was on

RPM's were fluctuating

There seemed to be reduced power on acceleration

In my research I found that these all can tie back to the BCM. I also found that it seems to be a common problem with some Chevys. Other people have had numerous sensors replaced, only to have the check engine light come back on and show the code for the same sensor that was just replaced. The only solution I've found online is that the problem is with the connections to the BCM. The design of the part encourages moisture and corrosion. Many people have had success with dielectric grease. My thought is that it helps to keep moisture out of the connections. After I cleaned the pins and connectors, I applied a small amount to the surface of each connector, but did not apply it to the pins since, as you said above, it doesn't conduct electricity so I was concerned that it would make the problem worse. So far, all warning lights are out and the car is running great. There isn't the same fluctuation in RPMs that there was and there isn't any decrease in acceleration. I'm going to give it a while before I can confidently say that it took care of all the problems, but it's looking good so far.
Adding dielectric grease around the connector housing, while messy, will reduce the chance that you get moisture into the connector. That shouldn't hurt anything. I don't think there is a big risk of moisture getting into those connectors on the Cruze, unless you have a bad seal somewhere or spill water on the dashboard or power wash the carpets. Also, moisture is more likely to enter the connector through the back where the pins are inserted. You would need to find a way to seal that as well. And if there is moisture on the connectors then you have a risk of moisture getting onto the BCM itself because it isn't protected from moisture either.

As others have stated, your issues sound like the battery ground problem.
 

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There doesn't appear to be any corrosion (unfortunately?). I'm cleaning all of the pins and connections with QD Electronic Cleaner. It was recommended to me to apply dielectric grease to the pins and connectors. I've read conflicting information on this. What is your opinion on that?
Use it!

I'll explain later - at work
 

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No! Dielectric grease is an insulator. It will insulate the terminals so that they don't conduct electricity.
Counter-argument


Check engine light on - in trying to resolve the check engine light, I put a new gas cap on, then had an oxygen sensor replaced, but the light came back on soon after

Service Stabilitrak alert was on

RPM's were fluctuating

There seemed to be reduced power on acceleration

In my research I found that these all can tie back to the BCM.
I'm not sure where you've been reading, but BCM problems on the Cruze are quite rare. The Stabilitrak light tends to come on with most any engine malfunction. So, consider that a red herring.

What we really need is the codes set. Anything else is just shooting in the dark. But if I was to make a guess, the PCV valve in the valve cover may have died. That's a pretty common fail item. It's also covered by powertrain warranty.
 
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