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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Apparently the world is an imperfect place and screws, or bolts, in this case do fall out all the time.
This happened about 1 month after my whole "supposedly faulty knee bolster airbag on the driver's side" incident. I was leaving my house and getting into my Cruze. I noticed on my floor mat directly below my steering wheel this 7mmx1.5 bolt laying there. Definitely new and I know it was way to big to be stuck in the tread of my sneakers. Nothing seems loose or rattles. When I go in for an oil change at my dealership I'll ask the tech who did the airbag connection if he can find its home.
 

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I would give a quick glance to the bottom of the steering column. It is definitely an interior bolt. I cannot place anywhere else this would go. I believe the interior trim bolts would be @ 6 - 8mm bolts
 

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Ha, learned something, didn't think the Cruze was still using bolts. But is that is a 7 mm hex head, a couple like that in the lower dash under the steering wheel.

Taken some time for GM to go to 100% metric, would go nuts on even a 1993 in the power train whether metric or English, but call that SAE now even though the SAE didn't have a darn thing to do with units of measurement.

Even on the 04 Cavalier for interior, was using a 7/32" head bolt, guys thought this was a 5.5 mm, only about a 4 mil difference.

Yeah, our idiot congress started this back in the 80's because the Japanese were not buying our cars, but their reason was they wanted the steering wheel on the right side, not the left like ours. Rest of us had to spend a small fortune to buy all metric wrenches and sockets.
 

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If this is an interior bolt it has to be going into the main structure of either the dash or the console. I think I seen this bolt style on the metal support of the console that bolts to the floor pan.

It's also "self aligning" meaning there's no threads on the end. This goes into a tapped hole that already has threads.

When I was looking at the passenger knee airbag when attempting to do the glove box light mod, I didn't think that these bolts were used for airbags. A little too heavy duty. But I never fully removed the airbag.
 
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Reminds me of the '58 Olds 98 my dad bought. The dealer called him and said the car had been delivered, but prep would take an extra 3 days. The front passenger floor was covered with various nuts, bolts, screws, and other fasteners. Enough to half fill a KFC bucket. The service department spent nearly four days going over the car to find all of the missing fasteners. Near as anyone could tell, if a part took five fasteners, they'd put 3 or 4 in and throw the remainder on the floor of the car. Guess the line was moving too fast to get the job done right. Since my dad only kept his cars for two years, he didn't think it was a big issue.
 

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Yeah, with 50K miles on my 88 Supra, decided to change the timing belt. Had to remove the power steering pump, and a rusty bolt dropped out of there. Checked all over trying to find a hole where that bolt would fit, practically drove me nuts, maybe it did. But just figured was dropped there in production.

Also found some wrenches when removing a door panel, finders, keepers.
 

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There's an old story about auto workers hanging things inside body panels (old body on frame) to drive owners and service people nuts trying to find the intermediate clunking noise in the car.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Down to 40% now on the DIC so hopefully soon that bolt will be placed back where it belongs.
 

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Yeah, with 50K miles on my 88 Supra, decided to change the timing belt..
That's pleasant compared to my 94 TT...had to basically remove the entire front fascia to get it done. Radiator and all. God only knows what was left out when it was re-assembled...heh.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Funny at the time I hadn't even noticed that until you pointed it out. Must be subconscious. I saw that movie too!
 

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Ha, not quite like the Cruze, even a major job just to replace the spark plugs, all that turbo stuff and the coil packs have to be removed just to find them.

View attachment 170417

That's not dirt under the hood, some kind of dull undercoat Toyota used from the factory, both an engine driven and electric fans, all that had to be removed, coolant hoses, and radiator. Alternator, AC compressor, PS pump brackets were L shaped, not only on the sides of the block but bend over the front of the timing cover, all that had to be removed. As the water pump with all those hoses.

Other stall in my garage was loaded with parts. Has an AT and not enough space in front to use an impact wrench so had to drop the flywheel cover and use my largest pair of vise-grips to keep the flywheel still. And use a large breaker bar, same thing for torquing it down.

Timing belts do not like engine oil, so insisted on replacing the crankshaft and camshaft seals as well, valve covers had to come off. Not because of mileage, they were already 25 years old. Wanted to break the new belt in before final tension adjustment, so took a couple of extra hours to pulse the starter, another reason to remove the plugs. Sure enough, it was loose.

Another good reason to remove the valve covers and tack the timing chain cover back on, with the harmonic balancer was to make darn sure the #1 cylinder was at TDC center on the firing stroke, some guys are 360* off and have to do this again.

Ha, told myself, you wanted a Supra so you got one, suppose to be a labor of love, parts costs was less than 60 bucks, but oh man, the labor involved. Didn't break a single bolt, can't say this about Detroit, but all that hardware had to be cleaned and lubricated for proper torquing.

2nd worse vehicle was an 86 Maxima, V-6 with a FWD with no space to work between the engine and the wheel well. Talk about bloody hands.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Holy Crap that's nuts Nick. I grew up driving Celicas. Mostly 1979 to 82 and it was always equipped with the 4cyl 22R motor. Very easy to service and work on.
 

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Was around a $2,700.00 for a Toyota dealer to do this job, but I guess they figure if you could afford a Supra, could also afford this. Regular Toyota's and Honda's in the late 80's and early 90's was around $600.00 for the timing belt.

Honda increased the change interval from 60K to 100K miles, did get an 84 for my kids with the 1.7L and dealer said the belt was just replaced. But it broke for my kids at 110K, didn't do anything with the tensioner that was the cause. Limited lubricated ball bearing I named these. This was a non-interference engine, so no other problems. Supra has an interference engine, had it in storage for a long time with 48K on it, didn't want to risk it. Yep, the grease in that tensioner was all dried up.
 

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So did they find where the bolt came from?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
So did they find where the bolt came from?
Going to have it done when I get the oil changed. Still at 40% on the DIC.
 
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