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Maybe at your dealership. Which one is this again so I never go there? kthx.
What part do you find objectionable? You have a full factory warranty, the engine replacement was disclosed in writing. The dealership is being honest and upfront. You have the option NOT to buy that particular vehicle if you choose.

I do not work for GM or at a GM dealership.
 

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cecaa850, your all over the place. lol. All I'm saying is selling a car that has already been tagged and titled and had a new engine put in it should not be sold as a new car.
I agree wholeheartedly with your first comment. As far as the second comment goes, I agree that if it were titled it should (can) not be sold as new. Personally I don't have an issue with the engine replacement scenario. You're getting a newer one that was in there to begin with and it would hopefully have all the latest improvements. I could be wrong but on an unsold vehicle, I think they have to put a replacement motor in, not just a short block but don't quote me on that. I'd contact a lawyer if it was sold to me without disclosure of that fact though. If I know about it up front, I'd most likely buy it and use that fact to get a deep discount.
 

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I am a new Cruze owner, but I'm an experienced automotive tech and I have one important piece of advice for anyone who's reading this, and anyone who experiences a similar situation with any make and model of vehicle. If an engine has run low on oil (especially when new), it has been damaged. Period. The dealer should replace the faulty engine with a complely new long block when the vehicle has low mileage, but the service departments make better numbers ($) by performing repairs and making labor hours. The promised advice is this: don't notice the oil puddle ;). Drive it untill it seizes and destroys the engine completely. I know it sounds painful, but this way you'll get the entirely new engine you deserve, and not some patchwork repair-job with scored internals from oil starvation, that may or may not run properly through the rest of the warranty period. They can't deny you warranty coverage. Just go out on the freeway, blow it up, then call roadside assistance and play dumb. Trust me you'll be way better off in the long run.
My gosh, there's so much wrong with pretty much everything in that statement I don't know where to start.
 

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One of the issues I had was the fact that he recomended taking it out on the highway and blowing it up. There's so many bad things that can happen. Motor locks up, you loose power and can't get over, the semi behind you doesn't notice till it's too late to miss you. Maybe you throw a rod and what's left of your oil or maybe all your coolant is dumped on the highway. You go into a spin or maybe the person behind you does. The whole scenario is sophmoric.
I don't know about Chevrolet, but some manufacturers computers will log a code for a low oil light. The manufacturer can compare that to the mileage you had engine failure and if you've driven for an excessive ammount of time like that, will deny warranty coverage due to negligence.
 
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