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Wheel Automotive tire Motor vehicle Automotive design Alloy wheel

need some help figuring out how to replace this stud on my rear wheel. What size stud does a chevy cruze takes? And what tools do i need to do this job?
 

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Parts store or dealer should have the wheel stuff you need for your hub. A expensive fix is just swap out the entire hub, this saves a lot of time. They are about 100$, worth not having to do all the work imo
 

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Hammer and maybe a punch to drive the old out. For the new get it started then an impact gun will pull it in and seat it as you put the wheel on.
 

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Parts store or dealer should have the wheel stuff you need for your hub. A expensive fix is just swap out the entire hub, this saves a lot of time. They are about 100$, worth not having to do all the work imo
Not really a bad idea as you can get them from $50 - $200 depending on source. The only big issue is getting the hub out. In my area they use a lot of salt in the winter which can make for changing the hub a real witch and quite often you need a torch to heat things up to get the hub out as its rotted in place.
 

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2014 Cruze Diesel, 2007 Cobalt, 1981 Camaro Z28, 2017 Volt
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Not really a bad idea as you can get them from $50 - $200 depending on source. The only big issue is getting the hub out. In my area they use a lot of salt in the winter which can make for changing the hub a real witch and quite often you need a torch to heat things up to get the hub out as its rotted in place.
I've found a slide hammer makes for absolute butter removal. Took the one out of my brother's Buick with ease - and the axle nut on that same car actually broke my breaker bar (with a jack handle on the end) trying to loosen it, my IR air impact wouldn't loosen it - it took the big M18 FUEL impact to remove it like it was nothing. But yeah, the slide hammer made quick work of that.

That said, depending on the hub design, swapping studs isn't too bad - I had to do all five on the Buick's other front hub a year or so prior. I found the Lisle stud install tool to be incredible helpful - it's just a bearing that allows the lug to spin freely while still pulling the stud into the hub.
 

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Not really a bad idea as you can get them from $50 - $200 depending on source. The only big issue is getting the hub out. In my area they use a lot of salt in the winter which can make for changing the hub a real witch and quite often you need a torch to heat things up to get the hub out as its rotted in place.
Here in Florida rust isn’t a problem lol. If you have rust I know bronze brush and PB blaster soak for a few days usually does it. If you don’t have a torch. If the rust is that bad , safe to assume a new hub would help.
 

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I've found a slide hammer makes for absolute butter removal. Took the one out of my brother's Buick with ease - and the axle nut on that same car actually broke my breaker bar (with a jack handle on the end) trying to loosen it, my IR air impact wouldn't loosen it - it took the big M18 FUEL impact to remove it like it was nothing. But yeah, the slide hammer made quick work of that.

That said, depending on the hub design, swapping studs isn't too bad - I had to do all five on the Buick's other front hub a year or so prior. I found the Lisle stud install tool to be incredible helpful - it's just a bearing that allows the lug to spin freely while still pulling the stud into the hub.
If I have to do five studs I’m just replacing the hub, but I’m one of the lazier mechanics
 

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If I have to do five studs I’m just replacing the hub, but I’m one of the lazier mechanics
Yeah, I would have if I had planned on it, but I was doing control arms on the car and I didn't feel like probably paying extra for a potentially lower-end hub from the parts store. In hindsight, it might have been good to, because we're pretty sure that's the problematic corner for the ABS system.

It was real easy, though. Honestly, the hardest part was getting the new studs into position, because GM changed the design just slightly between 2000 and 2001 where the former year had a large space where you could very easily position the stud behind and then pull it through...I had to bend **** out of the way and then it just would barely fit in...but they did, and then the tool made it a breeze to pull them into the hub.
 

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Yeah, I would have if I had planned on it, but I was doing control arms on the car and I didn't feel like probably paying extra for a potentially lower-end hub from the parts store. In hindsight, it might have been good to, because we're pretty sure that's the problematic corner for the ABS system.

It was real easy, though. Honestly, the hardest part was getting the new studs into position, because GM changed the design just slightly between 2000 and 2001 where the former year had a large space where you could very easily position the stud behind and then pull it through...I had to bend **** out of the way and then it just would barely fit in...but they did, and then the tool made it a breeze to pull them into the hub.
It sucks parts store inventory sucks so much now a days. Yah lifetime warranty is nice and all but it doesn’t cover labor and time lost
 

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Yeah, the great warranty means nothing to me if I'm constantly having to rip out and replace the part.
 
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