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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,
My car started running poorly with the check engine light flashing. The codes P0301 (cylinder 1 misfire), P2301 (Ign. coil A primary control circuit high), P0351 (ign. coil A primary/secondary circuit). I replaced the coil and the spark plugs The car ran perfectly fine for two days and then it happened again, with the same codes. I then exchanged the coil and the car ran fine everyday for about one week and then the same codes again and running poorly, but this time the coil completely burnt out the side smoking pretty good at cylinder one. I'm sure something is causing my coils to short out. I physically hand traced the wires from the ignition coil to the ECM, ground and fuse panel. The wires are in good condition with no breaks, melting or chaffing. I also checked the resistance from end to end unplugged on each of the wires and had low resistance on each one. The pins on both ends of the harness are free of corrosion. The one thing I have noticed is that when the key is on and the engine not running, coils 2, 3, and 4 all have 10mV coming from the ECM, coil number 1 has 58mV. That is with coil disconnected. The power wire is good. The ground is good, and the low reference ground is good. Is this a clear indication that the ECM is to blame for frying the coil? Does anyone know of any other checks I can perform to verify if the ECM is to blame? Has anybody encountered anything similar? Intermittent electrical are issues always difficult. Thank you in advance for any input, advice and wisdom.
Year. 2016 ( Date of manufacture 06/2015)
Engine. 1.4 Turbo EcoTec ( LDV/Tier2)
Miles. 109245
Again Thank you.
 

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I am having the exact same problem with my daughters car burnt up 3 coils if you find out what is going on with yours could you please give info Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #6
hello all,
Sorry i have been absent, Life gets in the way. So through my troubleshooting i have found that the number one coil driver wire and the number one injector driver wire had a resistance of about 50 M ohms. That is with the three ECM connectors unplugged as well as the coil and the four injectors. The driver wires are in no way connected and there for should be an open circuit when checking resistance between them. So the the amp draw and/or the short in the coil caused the ECM plug to be compromised. The No. one coil driver is pin one and the No. one inj. wire is pin two. It seems when the coil went out it also got hot enough to smoke the ECM plug and or the driver in the ECM. My local chevy dealer was too expensive and could not get a new engine harness at this time, so i went to a local pick your part junk yard and was able to acquire just the ECM plug that was bad. I spiced in the new/used plug and so far so good. So, the long and short of it is.. I replaced the ECM connector that housed the coil driver wires. And a word to the wise, Buy ACDelco. Through all of this Ive learned something about this car just does not like after market parts. I hope this helps someone. Please let me know what you find out on yours.
Thanks,
Chuck Daniels
 

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Update on my daughters car after recommendation we checked the thermostat sensor plug it had antifreeze in it so we replace the Complete thermostat housing And sensor And a new coil on it fired it up and let it sit and run for 45 minutes with no problems thought we had it fixed when We went to test drive it ,it quit and blow the number nine fuse it didn’t burn the coil this time but it continue to blow the #9 fuse every time we replace it
its been in the shop for 5 days now and still doing the same thing
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The thermostat sensor is in no way connected to the coil circuit. The number nine fuse is for injectors one and three according to the diagram. But all four injectors share the same power supply and it happens to be the power supply to the coil. If your blowing the fuse and were burning up the coil you probably have a short in the wiring harness itself. After burning up multiple coils myself I found the injector and coil driver wires shorted within the ECM plug on the harness
 

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The thermostat sensor is in no way connected to the coil circuit. The number nine fuse is for injectors one and three according to the diagram. But all four injectors share the same power supply and it happens to be the power supply to the coil. If your blowing the fuse and were burning up the coil you probably have a short in the wiring harness itself. After burning up multiple coils myself I found the injector and coil driver wires shorted within the ECM plug on the harness
This was exactly my same issue.
 

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Had the same issue, as ChuckDaniels says it ended up being a short in the ECM plug between the coil 1 and the injector 1 wires. Its was a simple fix. Don't even have to buy a new harness or plug. The plug comes apart very easily. Simply remove the top of the plug then you can remove the piece of the plug that the pins slide into to expose the wire slots. They pull out easily from the back. Clean any corrosion on the wire ends and within the plug and apply a thin layer of dielectric grease to the outside of the wire slots, push back in and reassemble the plug.
 
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