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My '17 threw the P01CB code last week at around 90,300 miles. I had noticed some drive-ability issues. It was kind of an occasional wobble or miss under changing throttle conditions. It wasn't a huge surprise when the CEL came on. It's also about due for a fuel filter change (20% on the DIC) and getting close to an oil change. The next time it goes in for oil, I was planning to go ahead and do the fuel filter and transmission service too. Oddly, I was getting exceptionally good fuel economy on that tank when it came on.

The definition of the code is retarded timing on the cylinder 1 injector. Everything I found on it indicated possible injector or fueling issues. I haven't run any additives in it up to now, so I thought it couldn't hurt to hit it with something that would condition the fuel and maybe clean up an injector or two. I added some Diesel Kleen Power Service to the tank, topped it up with more diesel, and gave it a little Italian tune-up too. The CEL went off on its own a few days later.

This isn't the first injector problem I've had. I had one that very noticeably failed early on and was replaced under warranty. The first year with this car was pretty awful, but the second and third years have been more like what I hoped for -- just maintenance and eating up a lot of miles.
 

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Pages 338 to 340 of that over 1000 page document cover this fault code. It sounds like it's for sure an injector acting up, and certainly deposits could be a factor, I also would note I have always changed the fuel filters before 20% and it NEEDED it each time, so I'd would for sure do the fuel filter as well.
I've just had my fuel filter changed for the second time at about 91,500 miles. It's been getting to about 20% life at around 45k miles. I was used to the VW TDI interval on the fuel filter, which was 20k miles, so going 45k seems like a lot. I don't have any idea what my Cruze filters have looked like coming out because I've let the dealer do them.

The dealer also added some injector cleaner (that I didn't ask for) so between what I put in and what the dealer donated and a new fuel filter, I may be set for a while. We'll see how it goes.
 

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This I think is one of the first Gen 2 diesel injector issues we have heard about, but your mileage is higher than many as well.

Hope the cleaner works.
Keep us posted about the injector.

Definitely change the fuel filter sooner next time.
 

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I've just had my fuel filter changed for the second time at about 91,500 miles. It's been getting to about 20% life at around 45k miles. I was used to the VW TDI interval on the fuel filter, which was 20k miles, so going 45k seems like a lot. I don't have any idea what my Cruze filters have looked like coming out because I've let the dealer do them.

The dealer also added some injector cleaner (that I didn't ask for) so between what I put in and what the dealer donated and a new fuel filter, I may be set for a while. We'll see how it goes.
Well, it is my understanding that the 6.6L Duramax Diesel uses that same filter, and on that engine probably it's 10-15K max for change interval. 45K still seems too long, but longer than 20K is likely due it having more capacity than needed for the little 1.6l engine. I'm sure GM figured a common filter for many diesels was an overall cost saver. Having said that, the filter does not really look to be much bigger, if at all, than the VW filter. The VW also was not a water separator, and perhaps was also a finer micron rating.
 

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Well, it is my understanding that the 6.6L Duramax Diesel uses that same filter, and on that engine probably it's 10-15K max for change interval. 45K still seems too long, but longer than 20K is likely due it having more capacity than needed for the little 1.6l engine. I'm sure GM figured a common filter for many diesels was an overall cost saver. Having said that, the filter does not really look to be much bigger, if at all, than the VW filter. The VW also was not a water separator, and perhaps was also a finer micron rating.
The 1.6 L in our cars easily gets triple the mpg's of the 6.6 L, and a filter's life is really based on the gallons of fuel passed through it. 10-15 K for the 6.6 L is a number GM calculated so that a truck owner didn't have to count the gallons of fuel between filter changes since mileage is easier to track. It's reasonable to say our cars (and filters) go through the same amount of fuel in ~45 K that the 6.6 L does in 15 K.

Also, I've been running my filter to 45 K, in Montana winters, with no issues thus far... Knock on wood...
 

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The 1.6 L in our cars easily gets triple the mpg's of the 6.6 L, and a filter's life is really based on the gallons of fuel passed through it. 10-15 K for the 6.6 L is a number GM calculated so that a truck owner didn't have to count the gallons of fuel between filter changes since mileage is easier to track. It's reasonable to say our cars (and filters) go through the same amount of fuel in ~45 K that the 6.6 L does in 15 K.

Also, I've been running my filter to 45 K, in Montana winters, with no issues thus far... Knock on wood...
A rebuttal to my own post, one can't change the filter too often, so if you're more comfortable running less miles between changes, by all means change that bad boy out! Haha
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The 1.6 L in our cars easily gets triple the mpg's of the 6.6 L, and a filter's life is really based on the gallons of fuel passed through it. 10-15 K for the 6.6 L is a number GM calculated so that a truck owner didn't have to count the gallons of fuel between filter changes since mileage is easier to track. It's reasonable to say our cars (and filters) go through the same amount of fuel in ~45 K that the 6.6 L does in 15 K.

Also, I've been running my filter to 45 K, in Montana winters, with no issues thus far... Knock on wood...
----
A rebuttal to my own post, one can't change the filter too often, so if you're more comfortable running less miles between changes, by all means change that bad boy out! Haha
My dad's from Montana. "Montana winters" is an expression I've heard a lot. :)

My understanding of the fuel filter life percentage was that it was roughly tracking the amount of fuel filtered. In addition to it being a large filter, I tend to maintain a pretty high average fuel economy, which would lend itself to more miles out of a fuel filter. Based on the monitor, I'm changing it quite a bit early at 20% life remaining.

Agreed, though, that it never hurts to change a filter early. As my Montana-native grandfather used to say when mechanics would chafe at his 1000-mile oil change interval: "if you think that oil's still good, go put it in your engine." ;)
 

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The 1.6 L in our cars easily gets triple the mpg's of the 6.6 L, and a filter's life is really based on the gallons of fuel passed through it. 10-15 K for the 6.6 L is a number GM calculated so that a truck owner didn't have to count the gallons of fuel between filter changes since mileage is easier to track. It's reasonable to say our cars (and filters) go through the same amount of fuel in ~45 K that the 6.6 L does in 15 K.

Also, I've been running my filter to 45 K, in Montana winters, with no issues thus far... Knock on wood...
Number of gallons AND the quality and contamination of the fuel. Cleaner fuel, longer life, dirty fuel shorter life. The filters I changed early had all kinds of crud, and had started to be sucked inward, indicated a bit of differential pressure was in play. I don't think the fuel life monitor does differential pressure, rather it is like to just be a number of gallons that pass through. On the filter rig for my truck, I added a pre-filter pressure, and a post-filter pressure, so I can change by actual pressure drop, also my transfer tank and its filter have an actual filter differential pressure gauge to change on actual conditions. It would be great if the fuel filter life monitor was looking at differential pressure, but I'm about 100% sure it is not doing that.
 

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Number of gallons AND the quality and contamination of the fuel. Cleaner fuel, longer life, dirty fuel shorter life. The filters I changed early had all kinds of crud, and had started to be sucked inward, indicated a bit of differential pressure was in play. I don't think the fuel life monitor does differential pressure, rather it is like to just be a number of gallons that pass through. On the filter rig for my truck, I added a pre-filter pressure, and a post-filter pressure, so I can change by actual pressure drop, also my transfer tank and its filter have an actual filter differential pressure gauge to change on actual conditions. It would be great if the fuel filter life monitor was looking at differential pressure, but I'm about 100% sure it is not doing that.
My statement assumed the two engines/vehicles were using the same fuel, so ~1/3 fuel consumption per mile yields ~triple filter life in miles. There's some omitted dimensional analysis in between. I agree that dirtier anything going through a filter dirties the filter quicker. The central air filter in a smokers house and the liver of a passionate drinker are great examples.

To those who are not changing these filters themselves, ask whoever changed the filter to see the old one. If the filter looks like it was used beyond its serviceable life, the lower fuel standards of your locale (quality and contamination) may require you to replace more often then the recommended ~45 K.
 

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Oh, I was just guessing on the 6.6 interval of (10-15K, the older trucks, I had a 2005, were 15K), turns out it's based on computer monitor (like the cruze), or not more that 22,500 miles. I would certainly not let it go that long! I have noted a trend across all OEMs in modern cars... they are competing for the least periodic maintenance and low maintenance cost as a selling point, and frankly I think the recommendations are pushing your luck in some cases. For example, the Gen 1 Cruze Diesel said "lifetime fill" for regular duty on the transmission fluid.. at 45K that fluid looked black as coal and as runny as water, and the new fluid made a noticeable improvement in shifting in that transmission.
 

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Well, it is my understanding that the 6.6L Duramax Diesel uses that same filter, and on that engine probably it's 10-15K max for change interval. 45K still seems too long, but longer than 20K is likely due it having more capacity than needed for the little 1.6l engine.
Fuel filter life is to be an average of 1,000 gallons filtered. The 40k change interval in the Cruze is to be about 1,000 gallons filtered. The change interval for the 6.6 V-8 is probably calculated to be similar: 1,000 gallons in 15k miles is an average of 15mpg.
 

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Also, I've been running my filter to 45 K, in Montana winters, with no issues thus far... Knock on wood...
Yeah, if you were headed into a winter when close to the end of the filter lifespan, it wouldn't hurt to just change it early and be set for the winter. I do the same with my oil changes. If I'm approaching the last 10-15% of oil life and headed into the coldest part of winter, I get it changed early and then it's good to go through the coldest months.
 

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40k is when the monitor hit zero on mine. Hopefully next time I can find a filter for less than what I paid for it at the dealership.
 

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Number of gallons AND the quality and contamination of the fuel. Cleaner fuel, longer life, dirty fuel shorter life. The filters I changed early had all kinds of crud, and had started to be sucked inward, indicated a bit of differential pressure was in play. I don't think the fuel life monitor does differential pressure, rather it is like to just be a number of gallons that pass through. On the filter rig for my truck, I added a pre-filter pressure, and a post-filter pressure, so I can change by actual pressure drop, also my transfer tank and its filter have an actual filter differential pressure gauge to change on actual conditions. It would be great if the fuel filter life monitor was looking at differential pressure, but I'm about 100% sure it is not doing that.
Fuel contamination is the huge unknown factor. One bad tank can ruin a new filter. You never really know how dirty the filter is. Mileage and gallons passed through are but a guideline.

I am not sure if the Cruze uses the fuel pressure reading to the HPFP (~60psi) to detect a clogged filter? I keep my fuel pressure on display on my ultragauge all the time.

Definitely for the cost and effort I would rather change it more than less. Diesel fuel systems are expensive and sensitive to cavitation and low fuel pressure. Not worth stretching the interval on the filter to me.

I am at 35k miles and getting ready to change mine soon.
 

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Fuel filter life is to be an average of 1,000 gallons filtered. The 40k change interval in the Cruze is to be about 1,000 gallons filtered. The change interval for the 6.6 V-8 is probably calculated to be similar: 1,000 gallons in 15k miles is an average of 15mpg.
My lifetime mileage is 42.6 mpg's. I drive an absurd amount of highway vs city. I bought my rig new just over two years ago and rolled over 77500 this morning. 1000 gallons of fuel puts me in the 40-45 K range for filter life. For most this is not the case, and their filters should be changed sooner accordingly.
 

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Yeah, if you were headed into a winter when close to the end of the filter lifespan, it wouldn't hurt to just change it early and be set for the winter. I do the same with my oil changes. If I'm approaching the last 10-15% of oil life and headed into the coldest part of winter, I get it changed early and then it's good to go through the coldest months.
I'll fix your first sentence just by removing unnecessary fluff.

Yeah, if you were headed into a winter when close to the end of the filter lifespan, it wouldn't hurt to just change it early and be set for the winter.
Yeah, if you were close to the end of the filter lifespan, it wouldn't hurt to just change it early.
 

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My '17 threw the P01CB code last week at around 90,300 miles. I had noticed some drive-ability issues. It was kind of an occasional wobble or miss under changing throttle conditions. It wasn't a huge surprise when the CEL came on. It's also about due for a fuel filter change (20% on the DIC) and getting close to an oil change. The next time it goes in for oil, I was planning to go ahead and do the fuel filter and transmission service too. Oddly, I was getting exceptionally good fuel economy on that tank when it came on.

The definition of the code is retarded timing on the cylinder 1 injector. Everything I found on it indicated possible injector or fueling issues. I haven't run any additives in it up to now, so I thought it couldn't hurt to hit it with something that would condition the fuel and maybe clean up an injector or two. I added some Diesel Kleen Power Service to the tank, topped it up with more diesel, and gave it a little Italian tune-up too. The CEL went off on its own a few days later.

This isn't the first injector problem I've had. I had one that very noticeably failed early on and was replaced under warranty. The first year with this car was pretty awful, but the second and third years have been more like what I hoped for -- just maintenance and eating up a lot of miles.
To bring this thread back on track, and summarize the points made by myself and others, I'll reference the OP. OP had an issue. OP took action to mitigated the issue. OP's issue subsided. Reactive maintenance is not the best way to fix things. Proactive maintenance is. Recommended filter life is a maximum under ideal conditions. Dirty filters should be replaced. Diesel fuel systems are expensive and sensitive.
 

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To bring this thread back on track, and summarize the points made by myself and others, I'll reference the OP. OP had an issue. OP took action to mitigated the issue. OP's issue subsided. Reactive maintenance is not the best way to fix things. Proactive maintenance is. Recommended filter life is a maximum under ideal conditions. Dirty filters should be replaced. Diesel fuel systems are expensive and sensitive.

Well Said, on my Cummins Diesel I have a pre-filter separator, then a 2 miron filter.... before the OEM engine filter. That is also how I can monitor pre and post filter fuel pressures and change by filter load, not arbitrary time or miles. Now, at some point I might add a 2 micron for the Cruze, but the issue is WHERE to put it. not much room to work with, the truck was easy, frame rail and many feet of space to work with.. definitely not a factor on first or second Gen Cruze, actually the first gen is even tighter than the second. The picture shows the pre-filter water separator, and 2 micron (white filters), and I have a transmission filter (orange) and cooler and pump, yes, on a MANUAL transmission, which is why the pump. The G56 on that vehicle is known to heat up under heavy towing loads, so I "fixed it". Yes, probably overkill.
Filter party.jpg
 
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