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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just curious if the difference in handling is worth switching the non zlink rear with a zlink one and if it's as simple (or almost simple lol ) as unbolting the the old and putting in the new. A complete used zlink system can be had for around $450. Has anyone ever done this?
 

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if you can get the whole rear axle assembly from the junk yard and all the parts as a whole it should be a easy swap. knowing gm they leave the bolt holes there just dont bolt it up.. may have some issues going from a non z rear drum to a z link disk since brake system would need to be made for it
 

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Should be OK......Z link was used on drum axles as well.....there is a drum Z link axle and a disc z link axle.

As far as handling......hard to quantify.
If you have a Cruze with z link (I did....2012 eco drum brakes) and drive a non z link version, it feels kind of loose in comparison.

The z link is appreciated by those who like a rather tight feel for general day to day driving......I would say it makes the chassis feel a bit more competent.

Depending on what you are searching for, handling wise, it might be a good move and as stated above, appears to be 'plug and play'.
Make sure you get the fasteners that hold the z link crossmember to the chassis......actually, do your best to get every fastener involved.

Rob
 

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Should be OK......Z link was used on drum axles as well.....there is a drum Z link axle and a disc z link axle.

As far as handling......hard to quantify.
If you have a Cruze with z link (I did....2012 eco drum brakes) and drive a non z link version, it feels kind of loose in comparison.
i didnt think they did a drum set z link. if so thats the ideal swap should be bolt in
 

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Its not direct, the holes aren't there. A complete axle swap would be necessary. There are other threads on this and we've discovered that unfortunately. As for the drive feel, I was told the Z-link stays very planted to the ground on bumpy uneven roads, where as my non-z link really doesn't just kinda bounces around back there.
 

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Its not direct, the holes aren't there. A complete axle swap would be necessary. There are other threads on this and we've discovered that unfortunately. As for the drive feel, I was told the Z-link stays very planted to the ground on bumpy uneven roads, where as my non-z link really doesn't just kinda bounces around back there.
Take a look at the OP's link.....he has located a complete, drum to drum assembly.

Rob
 

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I read all the posts but was clearly too tired to be posting . I thought later on the subject had switched to just adding z link to a non z link axle, but upon rereading that is not the case lmao. So sorry you can just disregard me LOL
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I read all the posts but was clearly too tired to be posting . I thought later on the subject had switched to just adding z link to a non z link axle, but upon rereading that is not the case lmao. So sorry you can just disregard me LOL
lol It's cool. :)

I found one locally for $325. Also checked to make sure there were threads in the hole the bolts in the frame go into and there is.
 

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A little late to the game, but if aren't aware of the Watts link, look that up. This is going to be somewhat similar. The Watts link replaces the panhard rod behind the rear-end. I own an F-Body and have debated going to that setup. It should really help, especially if the car is lowered.
 

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The Cruze either has a watts (Z) link setup or nothing......the axle without depends on the axle tube itself to maintain rear wheel position and the design does work.
As stated though, the Z link imparts a bit more precise handling during transitions. For the majority of drivers, the additional handling capabilities are lost, so I can see why Chevy chose to utilize the system on the higher line, more 'driver oriented' versions.

Regarding the gen 3 and 4 'F' bodies.
With the introduction of the gen 3, and its coil spring (replacing leaf) rear suspension, obviously there must be some method to stabilize the differential laterally.
Since the area needed for the upper, angled trailing arm lateral controls are occupied by the fuel tank, the only method, from a expense standpoint, was a panard rod.
If the car was designed from the ground up to be nothing more than a grocery getter, this cheezeball approach to axle location would be largely unnoticed.
But, the Camaro was always marketed as a good handling car (used to be marketed as 'The Hugger'....hugged the road).
Because the panard forces the axle to move side to side through its travel arc, those that drive it in a 'spirited' manner will pick up a kind of 'Spooky' (my term) feel as the axle transitions from loaded to unloaded if you are trying to have fun in the twisties.
Add to this, a pair of lower trailing arm bushings that are soft enough to allow the side to side motion the panard rod imparts and you end up a somewhat goofy handling chassis from about 7/10ths on up.

Those that own the gen 3/4 (mine is a 2002) know well how easy (and rapidly) this car can swap ends.

BMR was the first to come up with a true Watts link setup, but, IMO, the Fays 2 version, from the standpoint of simplicity, is just fine.
I still have the stock setup, but likely will embrace the Fays 2 kit if the day comes I want to tighten it up.

Wow!
Sorry gang.....got a little chatty there....soft spot for F body thing.

Rob
 
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