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Headed out Saturday night for a Christmas party. Temp was 13*F when I departed, 10*F on the way home. Had a 1/4 tank of 93 octane for the 100 mile round trip. Stopped 35 miles into the trip and put $20 worth of 93 in the tank since it was only $2.65 and 87 was $2.45. Usually around here 93 will run you .50-.60 more per gallon then 87.
Anyway I averaged 37.5 mpg for the whole trip. Secondary roads with the speed limit 55 with about 20 stop lights and a few stop signs just to give you an idea of how much stopping there is.

In warm weather I can average 45+mpg for this trip. I was wondering if anyone else experienced this kind of mpg under similar conditions?
 

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Wow, I average 29/30 MPG in the wintertime driving curvy secondary roads. I pass a lot of horse and buggies so there are a ton of stop and go points.

In the summer I usually get 32/33.

Take note that this is instrument cluster MPG, I'm sure if I took the time to crunch numbers I'm sure would be less.
 

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Small displacement engines work very hard in cold weather.
The obvious, the fuel mixture is richer, for longer periods of time is only part of it.
The cold tire rolling resistance is very high.....difficult to deform the tread to make a footprint.
Every wheel bearing has high rotational resistance.....that grease in there never really warms.
Motor oil and trans fluid viscosity is high for a longer period of time.
You are running the heater fan, usually the lights, and maybe the heated seats as well as trying to charge a cold battery that is rather resistant to recharging because it is living a cold corner.......so, the alternator is adding to the drag.

So, as you can see, there is quite a conspiracy going on to drive the mileage down.
A large displacement, high torque engine doesn't have much difficulty with all these things dragging at it, so the mileage isn't affected near as much as the 1.4 or any other small displacement, low torque design.

Good news is the mileage improves dramatically once the temperature rises.....something that isn't going to change much with a larger engine.

Rob
 

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I'm really waiting for my new one to hit anywhere close to its highway MPG rating on long trips. Then I remembered that its brand new, as are the tires, and it's been COLD out there every time I've gone on a trip. My '12 was much the same way - usually missing about 4 mpg on the highway when it was below freezing.
 

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I only average about 4mpg worse overall in the winter, but on all highway trips I notice the biggest losses. On one flat route along lake Michigan I can get 45MPG at 55mph in the summer time with my cruze, I only managed 30mpg when it was -18F outside(100% highway).


In the winter I can see no difference in my MPG with regular or premium fuel, Though I still run mid-grade most of the time.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Small displacement engines work very hard in cold weather.
The obvious, the fuel mixture is richer, for longer periods of time is only part of it.
The cold tire rolling resistance is very high.....difficult to deform the tread to make a footprint.
Every wheel bearing has high rotational resistance.....that grease in there never really warms.
Motor oil and trans fluid viscosity is high for a longer period of time.
You are running the heater fan, usually the lights, and maybe the heated seats as well as trying to charge a cold battery that is rather resistant to recharging because it is living a cold corner.......so, the alternator is adding to the drag.

So, as you can see, there is quite a conspiracy going on to drive the mileage down.
A large displacement, high torque engine doesn't have much difficulty with all these things dragging at it, so the mileage isn't affected near as much as the 1.4 or any other small displacement, low torque design.

Good news is the mileage improves dramatically once the temperature rises.....something that isn't going to change much with a larger engine.

Rob
Robby that's pretty much common knowledge. However the larger engine vehicles have the same results in cold weather. It's just the nature of internal combustion engines. I speak from personal experience when saying this.
I wasn't wondering why I was curious if others had similar results for better or worse so to speak. lol
Sparkman has a lower average, perhaps he has more stop and go then I did on this trip?
 
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