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Discussion Starter #1
I have thoroughly enjoyed my 2018 Cruze sedan for the past two years, but after really thinking about it as an investment it kinda makes me wish I had purchased the same car in a gasoline model. I would still have purchased a 6MT model instead of the automatic.

My biggest desire is simply MORE POWER. Now that I'm seeing the opportunity to push the gasoline engine past 200 horsepower with a custom tune, it makes me regret buying the diesel which has no affordable tuning options.
 

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Not here. Then again I have 4 Diesels. There is tuning for the Diesel, but you have to go overseas to get it, New Zealand. Also, EFI Live will tune a Gen 2 Diesel Cruze.

Note that many Gasoline engines have had blown pistons, certainly don't regret not having that potential outcome. The issues with the Diesel are emmissions, and if driven in mostly highway, that seems to be a non-issue in the Gen 2, and even the Gen 1 I have does pretty well in that driving profile.

Sure, the gasoline engine option was cheaper, depending on trim, but it won't ever have the low end torque of the diesel, nor capabilty to go a long time before rebuild. To get that 200HP on the Gas engine, I'm sure it's pushing 8000RPM, you get 140 Hp stock on the Diesel at a mere 5000 RPM or there abouts.

It's all perspective. The Diesel will be a rare breed in the future, and you won't ever see the MPG on the gas engine to rival the Diesel, and I've had a couple of Gas engine Cruzes for rentals and was able to observe that, even the 2019 with the CVT won't get close to Diesel MPG, but it's closer.. and yet CVTs have there own issues for longevity.

Be happy with the Diesel, and look into EFI Live if you really think you need more HP, the engine is certaily capable of producing it.
 

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I have a 2012 Cruze 2.0L TD and in 8 years I have never had any real issues to worry about. with 161hp and 266f/l of torque it is a dream to drive. My daughter has a 1.6T Cruze hatchback manual and even with its 177hp it is found wanting with 4 adults and luggage on board, compared to the diesel. I didn't buy the car for resale value, I bought it because it is like my old 3.8 V6 Commodore for easy driving and actually has more torque than the V6.
 

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Not even a little bit. No interest in speed from a daily driver really, and if I get a fast car it will be something cooler (aka older) that I use for fun. These days speed is boring ... every bland sedan, SUV, truck, and minivan is fast now. Personally I think the diesel is relatively fast but my perspective is different ... plus fast or not, you barely have to rev it and don't have to downshift in the mountains. The only times I wish I got something else are when I get to particularly dwelling on my mystery regen problem which causes me more stress than it should, but when I put that out of my mind the car is just so enjoyable. If I had to get something else it would probably be a Hyundai Veloster Turbo, but I think I'd be pretty bummed to be striving for 35 mpg on the highway, now that I'm used to what this car gets (even though from an economic standpoint it would really make no difference). And it's not that like the Veloster is bonkers fast ... hell I can get an older Mercedes AMG for less than $10k if I want something fast. What I'd love even more is a Lotus Europa ... that is my idea of fun (complete lack of crash safety aside). Don't get me wrong I wouldn't mind a gas Cruze with a 6-speed manual, it would have been on my short list if I hadn't picked the diesel, but imo the gains wouldn't outweigh the losses, for me, if I switched to it from a diesel.

To be fair I've also just always had diesels and I like them. I know they don't have much of a future, if any, so it means something for me to have a "Last Unicorn". I just think it was so cool that it existed in 2018, I knew it wasn't going to for long, so I don't think I could have resisted no matter whether the logic added up or not.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
nor capabilty to go a long time before rebuild
What percentage of car buyers today are rebuilding an engine? 1 in 1,000? 1 in 10,000? This isn't the 1900s any longer. Engines last the life of the vehicle until people want to upgrade to something newer.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
you won't ever see the MPG on the gas engine to rival the Diesel
When my diesel sedan was in the shop I had a loaner Cruze with the gasoline engine. Highway economy kept to 40mpg or greater, which is basically the same fuel costs when you factor in the extra cost of diesel fuel.
 

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You know that's not a good thing, right? When a manufacturer sells a few thousand of something among millions, you don't get good product support in the future.
Even though this makes sense, there is still appeal to having something obscure if it's what you like. If it's like most obscure things, the aftermarket will eventually come through, though I do have concerns over whether that will happen for these. I don't think most of us make a purely logic-based decision when picking a car. I mean honestly buying a new car is the antithesis of an investment anyway. Unless you bough a Buick Grand National new and climate stored it without driving it until now ... and apparently that is a thing people did.
 

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What percentage of car buyers today are rebuilding an engine? 1 in 1,000? 1 in 10,000? This isn't the 1900s any longer. Engines last the life of the vehicle until people want to upgrade to something newer.
Well, I have a 1996 Saturn back-up car, and a 1962 Land Rover.. so while many people never keep a car long enough to get to the engine re-build stage, some do.. if that is not you.. fine, but you ASKED for the opinion of others.. and some of those others will keep a car long enough to care about a rebuild.
 

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When my diesel sedan was in the shop I had a loaner Cruze with the gasoline engine. Highway economy kept to 40mpg or greater, which is basically the same fuel costs when you factor in the extra cost of diesel fuel.
Great.. go ahead and switch to the gas model if that is what YOU want. Everyone is free to choose.. you ASKED what others thought, and thus I provided my opinon.. Sure at current low fuel costs the MPG differnence is not a huge economic issue.. yet if you read up on the Gas engine, you really need at least 89 Octane, or MORE if you want power, and clearly you indicated you want power.. so 89 Octane or more is going to about the same as Diesel, perhaps more depending on market.. where I'm at, Diesel is sometimes cheaper than regular unleaded... I have seen just short of 60mpg on long drives.. and can drive across the entire state (WA) and BACK on a single tank of fuel.. There is something to be said about fewer trips and time standing at a fuel station pump as well.

But if you want a gasser, go ahead and get one, in many ways a fine car for what it's worth...
 

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You know that's not a good thing, right? When a manufacturer sells a few thousand of something among millions, you don't get good product support in the future.
GM sold many of these diesel engines overseas, and with the global market and internet I'm not concerned about finding parts.. the US market is not a good place for Diesels, especially cars.. but in the 2.8 Colorado/Canyon, and up there are some parts shared, like fuel filters and DEF system components.. so it should not be a big issue, and besides.. I have a back up car if needed..
 

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I have attainde just short of 60mpg on long drives.. and can drive across the entire state (WA) and BACK on a single tank of fuel.. There is something to be said about fewer trips and time standing at a fuel station pump as well.
Yeah the range is a big bonus imo whether there are fuel cost savings or not. I drove to Boston and back from south of Philadelphia (700 miles), and didn't even get down to the reserve. Not that I couldn't handle stopping for fuel, I did just fine with my Jeep that does 500 miles a tank tops. But if you're doing a ton of highway trips, not having to fuel much is nice. And during the summer diesel and regular are close or even the same, so the savings on a trip does add up.
 

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I have thoroughly enjoyed my 2018 Cruze sedan for the past two years, but after really thinking about it as an investment it kinda makes me wish I had purchased the same car in a gasoline model. I would still have purchased a 6MT model instead of the automatic.

My biggest desire is simply MORE POWER. Now that I'm seeing the opportunity to push the gasoline engine past 200 horsepower with a custom tune, it makes me regret buying the diesel which has no affordable tuning options.
I have a tune and I love it, only concern is the transmission and turbo. The gas transmission is just "strong" enough to handle a good tune.
 

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Our tranny is rated 450 450 isn't it? We should have zero worries. No?
WAyyyyy more torque than the Gasser everyday. I like it.
 

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I have a 2012 Cruze 2.0L TD and in 8 years I have never had any real issues to worry about. with 161hp and 266f/l of torque it is a dream to drive. My daughter has a 1.6T Cruze hatchback manual and even with its 177hp it is found wanting with 4 adults and luggage on board, compared to the diesel. I didn't buy the car for resale value, I bought it because it is like my old 3.8 V6 Commodore for easy driving and actually has more torque than the V6.
I would hold onto that car as long as possible. Loved my 2015 should have kept it and got a tune. It did not need a tune it just would have made my life easier.
 

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Considering the price disparity, you could probably sell the diesel, buy a gasser in similar condition, and pocket a few thousand dollars.

I won't be trading in my diesel until I can get an electric car that I'm happy with. I have a street-legal autocross car that I can drive when I want to have fun and beat myself up. For the other 99.8% of driving I want the quietest, most comfortable, and cheapest thing I can rack up stupid miles on without having to worry about wear and tear.
 

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Confession time: Does anyone other than me wish they bought a gasoline Cruze?

A: No
 

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Discussion Starter #19
If it's like most obscure things, the aftermarket will eventually come through, though I do have concerns over whether that will happen for these.
The aftermarket delivers for products that are either:
1. Widely available, like a Volvo 240, or;
2. Expensive and collectible, like a McLaren F1.

If you're Jay Leno and own a McLaren F1, sure, you can afford to send that car to the single USA-based McLaren mechanic in Philadelphia who can drop the engine to do the 5-year maintenance overhaul. $10 million dollar car and only 100 of them made? Sure, the aftermarket will support it because the rich owners can/will pay.

If you own a pedestrian car like a Volvo 240 where there are millions on the road, you can probably buy every part you need to overhaul the engine. And it's simple enough to do in your driveway without dropping the engine out of the car!

But how many vehicles did GM sell with this engine in the USA? Including a couple years of SUVs, did the number sold exceed 20,000? They were languishing on dealer lots without any advertising to sell them. GM yanked the engine from the SUV lineup for the 2020 model year because they weren't selling.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Diesel is sometimes cheaper than regular unleaded...
I get that weird price inversion where I live only on rare occasions. Diesel is always higher than gas here and it's multiple excuses throughout the year:
Fall: Farmers are harvesting so demand for diesel is high!
Winter: Heating oil demand is up so demand for diesel is high!
Spring: Farmers are tilling and planting so demand for diesel is high!
Summer: Farmers are doing, uh, stuff. It's priced higher because screw you!

There are two fuel stations that fight a price war on a two-week cycle. It drops by cents each day over two weeks and then there is a huge, major employer in town that on payday weekend every gas station in town shoots prices up by at least 20¢ a gallon when that payroll hits.
 
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