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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, so thats my question: What tire pressure should my 2013 cruze 1.4 Turbo RS have? This is how it looks right now and came like it from the GM Dealer.
It says 207 kpa front and same in rear, is that correct? I ask because I have the RS 18" rims

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What does it say in the OM?
 

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The pascal, was invented in the ISO convention back in 1967 where one Newton of force, also invented, they finally realized the gram was a unit of measurement for mass, not the effects of mass with gravity, but still using grams for weight. And that Newton of force is spread over an entire square meter, about 1,550 square inches so not a very strong number.

About the same force a gnat has on one of its feet. Thus extremely huge numbers. This was done by a bunch of noted college professors that also were noted for being hung up on LSD at that time. Also came up with dumping the HP with the watt, again, huge numbers. Electronic calculators were not even invented at that time and slide rules weren't good enough with only three significant figures maximum of accuracy. So all these worthless calcuations had to be done by hand.

Wasted more time with this BS then getting your real design work done.

110kpa isn't right, thats only 16 PSI, your tires would be running red hot and your belts would quickly break. My sticker says 210kpa that is 30 PSI, but prefer running at 35 PSI that is 241.3165 kilopascals.

You can see why us Americans prefer PSI or pounds per square inch, a lot easier to read and remember. Even our SAE when back to horsepower. There is 745.6999 watts in one horsepower, the reason why watts is also a huge number and also equally not easy to remember.
 

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As per Chevrolet manual, tyre pressure should be 32 psi all around

32? My Eco and my LS both listed 35 on the driver door jam. I don't know that the RS would be different. I would listen to NickD and follow at least 241 k pa(35 PSI) if not more.
 

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You can see why us Americans prefer PSI or pounds per square inch, a lot easier to read and remember. Even our SAE when back to horsepower. There is 745.6999 watts in one horsepower, the reason why watts is also a huge number and also equally not easy to remember.
That is why Kilo Watts (KW) and Newton Meters (NM) are used for power and torque. I still set my tyres by PSI as I was using this measure before we went metric. As all our road tests are done using metric measures I had to adept at least partially. It works quite well when you get used to it, but it takes time.
 

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That is why Kilo Watts (KW) and Newton Meters (NM) are used for power and torque. I still set my tyres by PSI as I was using this measure before we went metric. As all our road tests are done using metric measures I had to adept at least partially. It works quite well when you get used to it, but it takes time.
When I built my last home, used cubits. Didn't even need a ruler.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yes I just went to the michellin website and looked for the model of tires and they say maximun 300 kpa and yes it is different than the 110 my door sticker says. RS tire pressure is different to ECO because we have different tires and rim size, u have like 16 I think we have 18" abd that makes a difference

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LS 16s = 35psi
1LT 16s = 35psi
2LT 17s = 30psi
ECOs 17s= 35psi
LTZs 18s = 30psi

It's all on preference also. I run my 18s at 33 or so, and my 16s at around 40.
The higher the pressure the better the gas mileage, but that also can my your tires wear odd.
The recommendation that's on the side of the door is just that, a recommendation that's a good medium between gas mileage, ride comfort, and grip.
 
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Anywhere from the door placard to the max pressure printed on the tire sidewall. Measure tire pressures cold (not sitting in the sun either). Higher pressures will improve your fuel economy at the expense of a slightly stiffer and harsher ride.
 
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