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Cruze LT VCDi 2.0 Diesel Automatic.
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi!

I've read lots of DPF topics on this forum - sadly all of them seem to be about the 2012+ Cruze and not my lovely, aging 2010 one. I have a story, and a number of questions.

1. I have no money - thanks COVID.
2. I got an engine light and the codes are P02E0 and P02E2 - which appear to indicate electrical issues in the intake airflow system. We don't get a Haynes manual or any equivalent that I can find for this model in the UK. Garage want to replace the throttle body which they say is likely all coked up. They have replaced the mass airflow sensor.
3. After running with the light on for some time (see 1.) I now have a DPF light.
4. I drove for 30 miles in low gears for the speed - keeping revs between 2000 and 3000 for the whole run except when decelerating. I seem to remember this being a "Manual Regen" for the older cars... but I can't be certain.If there's a better way to get high exhaust temps please let me know.
5. The engine is running well for the moment; I can't detect any increase in fuel consumption or any reduction in performance. I know it needs to be fixed but see 1.

So : my questions.

1. Will a regen still work with a coked up throttle body?
2. Have I done the regen correctly? Is there another procedure for this older vehicle?
3. If a regen fails, is there any way for the garage to do one without replacing the DPF? (They're scaldingly expensive).
4. Are there any fault finding steps I can take at home to clear the intake airflow codes, or is replacing the throttle body the correct next step?

Thank you all.
 

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It does sound like a failed TB is giving you those codes.

As for the regen. Highway driving at 100kmh/62mph minimum, is usually the best way to get the heat into the DPF to complete a regen. Can keep it in a lower gear too.

If you have to get a manual regen done, then it will have to be done at a shop that can do this. The DPF should not have failed.
 

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For the diesel in the Korean-built Cruze, running it with the RPMs held at or above 2000rpm for 20 to 30 minutes is what the owners handbook says to do if the DPF light is flashing.

But if it's solidly on, it's probably too late.

You don't say if it stopped flashing doing the run, did it??

A mechanic who does a lot of work with GM cars should have the right subscriptions and tools to manually trigger a DPF burn.

I'm not sure if any of the recent Android-based OBD tools will be able to do it, there are a lot of differences between the original Korean-built cars and the US- or more recently Korean- or Chinese-built cars.
 

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Cruze LT VCDi 2.0 Diesel Automatic.
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It never did flash; it came on yellow. This is why I mentioned the age; I think the first gen built in the EU were different to the Korean AND the later models. It's solidly on, yellow; and a driven burn has always been enough in the past but now I have these airflow codes I'm not sure the exhaust is going to get hot enough. It looks like I'm going to need the throttle body replaced at least; possibly a manual burn. All that together is likely to come to nearly a thousand pounds worth of work :(
 

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Not sure how available junkyard parts are there? Could try to find a used TB? Although the TB part isn't usually that expensive if you can DIY?

It may do a burn once that is fixed on it's own.
 
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Cruze LT VCDi 2.0 Diesel Automatic.
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Sorry I forgot to come back and update... I came into some cash and had the TB replaced... turns out the actuator motor on mine was full of oil (no idea how) and gunked up beyond repair.
 
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