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Haven't seen any posts discussing the difference in M32 transmission cases from 2016 on, definitely good to know for anyone buying a used one from craigslist/ebay. If you ended up with the new one the casing has a new channel to get fluid to the last bearing.

I'm pretty jealous that in the UK they have so many cars using the M32, that there's a niche market aimed just for them. Says they got the tools from bosch and can split the casing to swap out the internals without dropping it from the car (on a vauxhall that is)...

https://www.eco-torque.co.uk/single-post/2016/12/02/M32-GEARBOX-Everything-You-Need-To-Know-About-Uprated-Bearings-End-Casing
 

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Guys, I'm sorry if this has already been answered (I searched and couldnt find an answer) but do all Gen1 cruzes have the exact same m32 manual transmission. I understand that the eco model is a bit different than the regular manual BUT would a regular 2011 cruze 6 speed manual transmission be the exact same one as the 2015 cruze 6 speed manual trans? Please let me know. (Should i stay away from 2011, 2012 and 2013 models?)
 

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Guys, I'm sorry if this has already been answered (I searched and couldnt find an answer) but do all Gen1 cruzes have the exact same m32 manual transmission. I understand that the eco model is a bit different than the regular manual BUT would a regular 2011 cruze 6 speed manual transmission be the exact same one as the 2015 cruze 6 speed manual trans? Please let me know. (Should i stay away from 2011, 2012 and 2013 models?)
The shifter assembly on top of the trans changed a little bit for 2013+, but it will bolt up the same.

I think they'll probably all have the bearing/flywheel failures.

The LT/Eco gearing is different. If you want to switch between one gearset and the other, the car won't care.
 

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Hello, I'm new to forum and new to the Cruze. I just picked up a 2016 Cruze Limited LS with the 1.8L and 6 speed manual, with about 8000 miles on the clock. I too have felt that the transmission is a bit notchy (not as bad as my 1987 Fiero GT), but still noticeable, especially when cold.

I would like to switch out the transmission fluid, probably for the AMSOIL 5W-30, since I live in Michigan; however, I'm concerned about voiding the powertrain warranty. Anyone have experience with this? Are there any alternative fluids that GM recommended?

Thanks!
 

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Hello, I'm new to forum and new to the Cruze. I just picked up a 2016 Cruze Limited LS with the 1.8L and 6 speed manual, with about 8000 miles on the clock. I too have felt that the transmission is a bit notchy (not as bad as my 1987 Fiero GT), but still noticeable, especially when cold.

I would like to switch out the transmission fluid, probably for the AMSOIL 5W-30, since I live in Michigan; however, I'm concerned about voiding the powertrain warranty. Anyone have experience with this? Are there any alternative fluids that GM recommended?

Thanks!
There are no alternatives.

AMSOIL synchromesh works well in that transmission, in those conditions. Some dealers have even filled the Synchromesh MTF for their customers.
 

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Is there harm going to happen by parking uphill on my driveway that is somewhat steep and the fluid being at the back of the trans as I pull away before fluid begins to be moved around? You can hear noise before the fluid starts to really move. I guess I should back out and go down the hill when I pull away vs up the hill.
 

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Hello, I'm new to forum and new to the Cruze. I just picked up a 2016 Cruze Limited LS with the 1.8L and 6 speed manual, with about 8000 miles on the clock. I too have felt that the transmission is a bit notchy (not as bad as my 1987 Fiero GT), but still noticeable, especially when cold.

I would like to switch out the transmission fluid, probably for the AMSOIL 5W-30, since I live in Michigan; however, I'm concerned about voiding the powertrain warranty. Anyone have experience with this? Are there any alternative fluids that GM recommended?

Thanks!
I live in Michigan and use amsoil synchromesh. I had my trans replaced under warranty with synchromesh in it and didn't get questioned. I was hoping it would have taken care of the slight 2nd gear whine it had, but bearing was going out. I never kept stock fluid in it during the winter since I bought it at 51k miles, now has 118k. When the trans is cold soaked overnight and you first start moving in the morning the shifter feels slightly notchy but nothing extreme. It goes away after maybe a mile or two.
 

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Hey there,

I've recently bought a used 2012 Cruze Eco Manual at around 62k miles, so far I've ridden it up to 67k miles.

I was looking at replacing the transmission fluid as I can't verify if that's ever been done, although I had the clutch replaced so I'm not sure if my mechanic would have had to replace it when they replaced my clutch.

I'm unsure if I have the m32 transmission and I don't know how to check.

I'd like to put something besides OEM transmission oil in and if it's safe to put the amsoil transmission oil in then I'll do it, I just want to make absolutely 100% sure I have the right transmission for it, that I'm buying the right fluid, and that it actually is safe to put in my transmission.

Is anyone able to help me figure out these things? Aside from that, is it safe to change the transmission fluid at my mileage when I'm unsure if it's ever been changed? I'm not planning on doing a flush, just a self change by draining it out for a few hours.
 

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Hey there,

I've recently bought a used 2012 Cruze Eco Manual at around 62k miles, so far I've ridden it up to 67k miles.

I was looking at replacing the transmission fluid as I can't verify if that's ever been done, although I had the clutch replaced so I'm not sure if my mechanic would have had to replace it when they replaced my clutch.

I'm unsure if I have the m32 transmission and I don't know how to check.

I'd like to put something besides OEM transmission oil in and if it's safe to put the amsoil transmission oil in then I'll do it, I just want to make absolutely 100% sure I have the right transmission for it, that I'm buying the right fluid, and that it actually is safe to put in my transmission.

Is anyone able to help me figure out these things? Aside from that, is it safe to change the transmission fluid at my mileage when I'm unsure if it's ever been changed? I'm not planning on doing a flush, just a self change by draining it out for a few hours.
Yes, M32.

Amsoik Synchromesh for an area with cold winter's; 75-90 for an area with mildish winter's (you rarely see teens to single digits).

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 

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I recently had an issue with my wife's 2013 1.8 LS 5-Speed transmission with 78,000 kms (48,467 miles). I had taken the car for regular drive to check if it had any issues that required attention.

I stopped at a hardware store to buy some stuff but the car would not engage any gear. It seemed to be stuck on 5th gear in neutral position.

Having read this thread and having no record of changing transmission fluid, I totally freaked out I would need a new transmission. Got the car on a tow truck to take to my local garage.

After pulling the entire front suspension down, we got the transmission out. We drained about 1 liter (1.05 quarts) of totally worn out fluid and opened up the selector cover fearing the worst as Cruze is not a common car in these parts of the world. Finding a replacement would be an uphill task.

As luck would have it, we found it engaged all gears manually. No damaged synchronisers . I took the opportunity to replace clutch, plate and release bearing and refilled with 75W-90 transmission fluid. Thank you XtremeRevolution.

No meshing gears or notchy shifting just super smooth shifting
 

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Really nice writeup on the gearbox:th_dblthumb2:
Would never have guessed my new Cruze shared the same box as my 2008 Corsa - will defo get right on changing the fluid once i get it!

To add I know a good telltale sign of worn main shaft bearings is stick movement in 1st & 5th, once that becomes noticeable you're probably looking at a new gearbox/complete refurbish in the near future.

My Corsa has just crossed 135k miles and his some play & movement, not in 1st/5th yet thankfully.
 

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The M32 calls for a straight 70W GL4.

75w90 is too thick for anywhere but the hottest climes in my opinion, and I've found the cars with it in them feel "smooth" but at the sacrifice of quick shifts, they also feel sluggish to me. This is why neither Amsoil, nor any other major brand recommends it as a replacement for the specified GM 19259104 fluid. Even 5w30 syncromesh is to thick in my opinion, not mention it likely has sacrificed GL4 protection level, something necessary for the final drive and main shaft bearing components in particular.

Using a fluid that is literally more than twice as thick as recommended makes it "feel smooth", but this increased viscocity slows downs fluid evacuation from synchronizer comes and this shearing dramatically increases the oil, and the synchros temps. And lead to premature failure in worst case scenarios.

All that said, I really like, and highly recommend Redline MT-LV as an appropriate replacement for 19259104.
 

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The M32 calls for a straight 70W GL4.

75w90 is too thick for anywhere but the hottest climes in my opinion, and I've found the cars with it in them feel "smooth" but at the sacrifice of quick shifts, they also feel sluggish to me. This is why neither Amsoil, nor any other major brand recommends it as a replacement for the specified GM 19259104 fluid. Even 5w30 syncromesh is to thick in my opinion, not mention it likely has sacrificed GL4 protection level, something necessary for the final drive and main shaft bearing components in particular.

Using a fluid that is literally more than twice as thick as recommended makes it "feel smooth", but this increased viscocity slows downs fluid evacuation from synchronizer comes and this shearing dramatically increases the oil, and the synchros temps. And lead to premature failure in worst case scenarios.

All that said, I really like, and highly recommend Redline MT-LV as an appropriate replacement for 19259104.
Observe the date on this thread; November 2013. That's how long hundreds (if not over a thousand by now)of community members have been running both AMSOIL Synchromesh and AMSOIL 75W-90 GL-4.

75W-90 is a dual-rated gear oil. It has a wintergrade rating of 75, irrelevant at operating temperatures, and a 100C viscosity SAE rating of 90. However, 90 is simply a range on the scale, from 13.5 cSt to 24.0 cSt. That's a big range. AMSOIL's 75W-90 GL-4 is cSt of 13.9; all the way at the bottom of the scale. Do not confuse AMSOIL's 75W-90 GL-4 with other 75W-90 GL-5 differential oils. I have been using the 75W-90 GL-4 for about 40,000 miles, while BNR tuned and towing my boat and utility trailer (~900 pounds and 600 pounds empty, respectively), filled at 2.5 quarts. I can shift at 90F, and I can shift at -5F just the fine. It is not "too thick" and in fact shifts better at freezing temps than GM's fluid did.

If you submit the oil for analysis on the factory Castrol BOT 303, you'll find a 100C cSt viscosity of 6.0-6.5. It is very thin, about as thin as ATF (really should make you reconsider your position on the importance of the EP additives in thicker gear oils) and intentionally done so for fuel economy at the expense of protection (go research the 5/6 gear shaft bearing and input shaft bearing failures on the M32; they didn't occur on Synchromesh or SAE 85/90 weight gear oils). This forum is full of complaints about GM's 70W fluid, and rightfully so; it works in low temperatures but causes some serious issues as it thins when heated, where hundreds of owners have concluded it is too thin.

Because of all of the failures attributed to this excessively thin fluid, and because of the inconsistent and notchy shifting it causes when hot, most owners have switched to either of AMSOIL's options and have been quite happy with the results. The overwhelming majority are using AMSOIL Synchromesh, which has a cSt rating of 9.7 @ 100C. It is slightly thicker than the OEM fluid without being excessively thick. I've sold about 120-140 changes per year for the last 5 years, primarily to M32 owners. This is not a small sample size. If there were some real-world reasons to avoid recommending it, I would have heard them by now, or they would have been posted in threads like this. The oil analysis reports we have received also don't support your suspicion regarding premature failure or wear.

All of the tribology research I've done has indicated that all Synchromesh fluids have GL-4 levels of EP additives (one link just as an example), so that's a misguided concern.

Yes, thicker fluid takes longer to evacuate from the synchros, and if it were so thick that it would be problematic, you'd also notice greater difficulty shifting into gears (it would require more force to shift). There is a difference between a theoretical problem and a practical problem, and that difference can be explained by the question, "just how much of a difference does it actually make?" I'd argue that with Synchromesh or SAE-80 weight gear oils, that difference is negligible, and inconsequential with 85/90 dual-rated transmission fluids.

I'll keep using the 75W-90 GL-4 MTF because I tow with this car, which is tuned and has a GTX turbo installed, running an E50 ethanol blend, and making substantially more power than it did when it was stock. So far, my shift quality and synchro engagement speed has been exceptionally good, especially since I designed the clutch accumulator bypass and removed the clutch delay valve.
 

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As I pointed out, a lot of my post was what I chose to opine on the subject. How many people use fluid x doesn't affect my opinion. In fact one could argue mt fluid usage is subjective. Ones smooth is my sluggish. My quick may be someone else's notchy.

I don't argue that BOT303 is very thin, {6.2 at 100c by BPs own SDS if I recall}and I never recommended it, nor have I found it to be durable.

That said, swapping to a fluid with massively higher viscocity can/does have the side effects I mentioned. This is not opinion. The advantage or detriment of the behavior of the trans at differing viscocities is as I mentioned, subjective for most.

The 75w wintergrade viscocity may be
Irrelevant at operating temp, but that does not make them irrelevant. The Amsoil 75w90 has a viscocity at -40degrees of nearly six times that of the Redline MTLV, the Amsoil syncromesh, is even THICKER. And this increased viscocity is there from -40, to 40, to 100.

I'm not sure exactly what select facts you expect me to glean from Widmans write-up, nor do I believe the assertion that there are no Syncromesh formulations that offer less than GL4 protection levels. Amsoil states Syncromesh is for "transmissions and transaxles where non-extreme-pressure fluids are used". Nowhere in the MTF document (g2080) does it mention the fluid is suitable for applications where GL4 level protection is needed.

If your chosen fluid works and feels good for you, that's great, you should use it. Doesn't mean it's right for everyone and every car, as you mention your situation is unique. I offered differing opinions and anecdotal and factual evidence to go along with recommendations. It's up to individuals to make up their minds. Now there's one more quality fluid to choose from, one that is far superior in use to the stock fill, and still maintains proper levels of protections, proper viscocities and garners the makers approval for this applications.

Cheers.
 

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As I pointed out, a lot of my post was what I chose to opine on the subject. How many people use fluid x doesn't affect my opinion. In fact one could argue mt fluid usage is subjective. Ones smooth is my sluggish. My quick may be someone else's notchy.

I don't argue that BOT303 is very thin, {6.2 at 100c by BPs own SDS if I recall}and I never recommended it, nor have I found it to be durable.

That said, swapping to a fluid with massively higher viscocity can/does have the side effects I mentioned. This is not opinion. The advantage or detriment of the behavior of the trans at differing viscocities is as I mentioned, subjective for most.

The 75w wintergrade viscocity may be
Irrelevant at operating temp, but that does not make them irrelevant. The Amsoil 75w90 has a viscocity at -40degrees of nearly six times that of the Redline MTLV, the Amsoil syncromesh, is even THICKER. And this increased viscocity is there from -40, to 40, to 100.

I'm not sure exactly what select facts you expect me to glean from Widmans write-up, nor do I believe the assertion that there are no Syncromesh formulations that offer less than GL4 protection levels. Amsoil states Syncromesh is for "transmissions and transaxles where non-extreme-pressure fluids are used". Nowhere in the MTF document (g2080) does it mention the fluid is suitable for applications where GL4 level protection is needed.

If your chosen fluid works and feels good for you, that's great, you should use it. Doesn't mean it's right for everyone and every car, as you mention your situation is unique. I offered differing opinions and anecdotal and factual evidence to go along with recommendations. It's up to individuals to make up their minds. Now there's one more quality fluid to choose from, one that is far superior in use to the stock fill, and still maintains proper levels of protections, proper viscocities and garners the makers approval for this applications.

Cheers.
People don't use "quick" and "notchy" interchangeably. Notchy refers to a resistance getting into gear. There is no confusion there, so let's not treat everyone's experience as being dubious or worthless. The metric just about everyone has used for transmission shifting performance is how quickly it gets into gear, how smoothly it gets into gear (lacking gritty feedback or resistance that you need to apply additional force to overcome), and whether or not the 1-2 gear shift grinds. People don't switch because everything is working great on the OEM fluid; they switch because there are problems.

You don't recommend BOT 303 and acknowledge it's very thin, but you recommend Redline's equivalent, which is the same 100C cSt viscosity, without knowing anything about its formulation that might guarantee any better results. You don't see the problem there? Given the problems we've seen on the same viscosity, same GL rating fluid from the factory, I'm not seeing the justification and you've had two opportunities to provide it. What makes Redline's fluid a far superior one to the stock fill? It's the same viscosity, the same GL rating (and note, the stock fluid doesn't shear at all according to oil analysis, so it actually is pretty durable). Do you have anything to base this off of other than a general impression of Redline as a brand? Because I used to recommend them too before ConocoPhillips bought them out. Do you have any trending oil analysis from extended use on that fluid? Do you have any evidence to support your recommendation or the assertion that it's superior to the factory fill? What, exactly, makes it better in your eyes?

I agree, the side effects exist, but as I noted in my post, you haven't discussed the degree to which they exist. Just because something exists theoretically, doesn't mean it is consequential in context. I don't expect you would have done any testing on this particular transmission to evaluate fluid temp or trending wear so I won't ask for the evidence, but if you can't at least give an indication of just how much of a difference you expect, then there's not much to be discussed; it's all rhetoric. Now, I have had people accidentally use AMSOIL's 75W-90 GL-5 Severe Gear differential oil and report some shifting difficulties which would support your analysis, but that's not the fluid we're discussing here, and is significantly thicker in viscosity than the 75W-90 GL-4 (which AMSOIL actually dual rates as an 85/90). The only time I've sold people the 75W-90 GL-4 is when they had a 1-2 shift grind and had no other way to get rid of it. The overwhelming majority of owners run Synchromesh, which I've run in the past as well.

Synchromesh fluids are overwhelmingly GL-4 compliant even though they are not rated as such because GL ratings are typically reserved for applications where extreme pressure protection is required (differentials), of which the M32 is not one. The GL rating refers to the percentage of EP additives in the oil. Yes, the M32 contains a built-in differential, but it is not subjected to extreme pressure loads, as evidenced by the fact that the factory fill uses a 6.5 cSt transmission fluid and not one person, on any fluid, has ever reported an issue with the stock differential in the nine years this transmission has been in service in the US. Surely you are aware that an increase in viscosity also improves film strength, and that it's better to rely on hydrostatic film than it is to rely on boundary lubrication (EP additiveS) when that film fails. You're questioning GL ratings and in the same breath stating that the two fluids hundreds of Cruze owners have been using are twice as thick in viscosity.

As for viscosity, you're going about it all wrong (besides the fact that your data isn't correct either). I don't care how the fluid flows at -40F, because 99.9% of people on this forum will not drive their vehicles in those conditions. Those who do will have engine block heaters at minimum, which will also transfer heat to the transmission that's bolted to it, or allow ample idle time to warm up the engine and transmission so they won't be operating the fluid at -40F. Viscosity is a nonlinear curve, and using one, two, or even three data points doesn't provide an accurate representation of viscosity. Fluid formulations may start thin and add polymers to thicken them at higher temps, or start thick and use pour point depressants and other viscosity index improvers to thin them when they cool. How a fluid performs at -40F is absolutely no indicator of how it will perform at -20F, 0F, or 30F, and you don't have the data necessary to make that evaluation.

For example, at -40F, Synchromesh is thicker than 75w-90 GL-4. However, at 104F, Synchromesh is approximately half the viscosity of 75W-90 GL-4. Again, viscosity curves are nonlinear.

I'll leave you with this oil analysis of AMSOIL's Synchromesh driven for 76,709 miles. Aside from some aluminum, likely entered through the breather port or leeched from the housing, the actual wear levels are remarkably low. The viscosity has thinned to a 7.1 cSt (rather close to the OEM fluid, in fact), but there is no noteworthy metallic wear that would support your blanket assertion that using a thicker fluid is going to cause long term wear or any other problems, or that the EP additive concentration of this fluid is inadequate.

 

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Discussion Starter #138
Here's a link to a very good indepth writeup on why & how M32 boxes fail: M32 Gearbox – WG Motorworks
General consensus being too low oil level causing insufficient lubrication of pinion bearings (premature wear & overheating) as well as poor quality factory fill - exactly the points Xtreme has listed.
Curiously enough, they recommend a 75W-80 gear oil, which is a comparable viscosity to AMSOIL Synchromesh.
 

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I wanted to create a thread that described the known issues with this transmission and their resolution. This contains the collective knowledge and experience of the CruzeTalk forum for the past couple of years, knowledge acquired from our brothers and sisters over on the Sonic Owners' Forum, and knowledge taken from overseas where the M32 is used in many Vauxhall and Holden vehicles.

Notchy Shifting
This will develop as early as 5k miles and will worsen as it goes by. If you are reading this thinking to yourself "but my transmission is fine," then you don't know what this transmission should feel like. I thought mine was fine until the problem was explained to me. If you have to force your shifter into gear as you accelerate with even a moderate amount of power, you have a problem. I'm talking up-shifting, not down-shifting. I can shift my Cruze up with a pinky. The cause of this is degraded transmission fluid.

1-2 Shift Grind
This is the result of the design of the synchros, a high 1-2 gear ratio change, and the stupid thin OE fluid shearing down too easily. The gear is fine, and the issue is mostly harmless, but it is rather annoying. Since it is synchro related, you will notice it more on the Cruze Eco than on other models, as the Eco has a higher 1-2 shift ratio change. There is no known mechanical fix. However, keep reading.

Heat
We have learned from our cousins with Holdens and Vauxhalls overseas that this transmission reaches dangerous operating temperatures with only 20 minutes of in-town driving. It is a very compact transmission and the heat has nowhere to go. A high engine operating temperature contributes to this problem.

5-6 Shaft Lubrication
Filled to the GM recommended level, the transmission starves the 5-6 gear shaft of proper lubrication. This was discovered on the Vauxhall forums when they were losing shaft bearings left and right. The solution was to overfill the transmission by half a quart, for a total of 2.5 quarts.

Fluid, the solution...sort of.

From the factory, the transmission uses a rather thin fluid, chosen for fuel economy purposes. However, it does not lubricate well (see 1-2 shift grind & notchy shifting), and it does not hold well up to heat. The solution to the notchy shifting is new fluid. Our members have used Royal Purple and Redline's offerings, and none of them perform as well as Amsoil Synchromesh. In fact, Royal Purple was the worst fluid we have tried, and the fluid ended up coming out dark and burnt.

This will sound like a sales pitch, but know that this has been tried, tested, and verified by the Gearheads on CruzeTalk. Amsoil Synchromesh completely eliminates the notchy shifting. It has a very high quality formulation of fully synthetic base stocks, and a very good friction modified package that greatly improves the function of our synchros. While it may not completely eliminate the 1-2 shift grind, it does help, A LOT. The 75W-90 GL-4 fluid has been reported to completely cure the 1-2 shift grind for many people. On my Cruze ECO, I have not yet been able to make it grind. Those who can note that even under hard driving, it happens rather rarely, in the range of 2 times a month as opposed to several times a week. Filling to 2.5 quarts total also helps with the heat issue, and provides better lubrication of the 5-6 gear shaft. EDIT: GM has officially updated the transmission fill specification to 2.32 quarts as of at least 05/2016!

Here is the fluid recommended as an OE replacement: AMSOIL Manual Synchromesh Transmission Fluid 5W-30

For tuned vehicles and vehicles driven more spiritedly, I recommend the 75W-90 transmission fluid and transaxle gear lube: AMSOIL Manual Transmission & Transaxle Gear Lube 75W-90



Disclaimer: These products aren't officially recommended by AMSOIL's technical team due to variations in specification (and the constantly changing OE specification). Use at your own discretion, as I cannot be held liable for any side effects or problems. This product is offered as an option based on the success others have had with it.

More information on Gen1 Cruze Clutch and Shifting upgrades: https://www.cruzetalk.com/forum/10-gen1-powertrain/236181-gen1-cruze-clutch-shifting-upgrades.html

I disagree with this post, I have 100k miles on my 2014 Cruze with 6 speed manual, I have driven it in the mountains, in Florida during the summer, in Canada during the winter. I live in a city and in the summer time the heat is amazing. I have never had a single one of the issues listed up here. I have never needed anything other than routine maintenance except for replacing the waterpump at 89k miles.
 

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My 2014 1.4L manual would only go into 3d gear on I-95. 60,605 miles. Dealer admits it needs a new transmission, which they say is covered under the warranty, but still want me to pay for the shifter cable, clutch and flywheel claiming they aren't covered under the powertrain..... can anyone help me to verify or give information which would help me advocate w/ my dealer?
 
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