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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Seems there is a rash of these going around, so this thread will be created to document this. Once I have enough information, I'll create a write-up, and will perform this service on my vehicle as preventive maintenance.

Tutorial for replacement:
http://www.cruzetalk.com/forum/129-engine-transmission-tutorials/118210-how-replace-turbo-oil-feed-line.html

Pictures of the oil leak in question here:
http://www.cruzetalk.com/forum/34-1-4l-turbo/103386-possible-turbo-oil-line-o-ring-leak.html

Pictures of the oil line removed here:
http://www.cruzetalk.com/forum/34-1-4l-turbo/104202-turbo-oil-feed-line-leak.html

Additional discussion here:
http://www.cruzetalk.com/forum/25-service-issues/102569-oil-leak-turbo-oil-feed-pipe.html

The oil feed line appears to require two o-rings. Part number for the o-rings is 55558112. GMPARTSDIRECT has them for $5.30 apiece.

I recommend a replacement of the entire feed line, which includes new o-rings. Part number for that is 55592600. GMPARTSDIRECT has it for $23.10.

"But isn't this covered under the powertrain warranty?" Yes, but for $15-$30 worth of parts, it will cost me more in time and gas to have the dealer do it, and the warranty doesn't last forever.

We can add these o-rings to the Cruze Owners' toolkit, alongside a new valve cover.

Replacement of this item as preventive maintenance should be considered. My first guess would be every 50,000 miles or 3 years, whichever comes first.
 

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This is a pretty common failure on turbo cars. Those Orings dry out from heat cycling and being sandwiched between the hot turbo and really hot oil.

I think I did it at least twice in 100,000 miles on my old car.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
This is a pretty common failure on turbo cars. Those Orings dry out from heat cycling and being sandwiched between the hot turbo and really hot oil.

I think I did it at least twice in 100,000 miles on my old car.
So it sounds like my 50k recommendation estimate would be valid. I'm about 3k miles from having to do this on my car then.
 

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I just noticed tonight that I have some oily residue forming around the oil line on my Cruze. I also noticed the feed line on mine looks a bit different than the other pics that I've seen in the threads. I wonder if there's a new/redesigned part for the line?

WP_20150118_17_18_40_Raw.jpg

I also wonder if there are better O-rings that could be used to replace the OEM ones. Something made with a stronger, more temperature tolerant rubber?

I'd like to find out, I wonder if anyone has an idea what size the rings are?

Edit: Also, I'm right at 55,000 miles.
 

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Im sorry if I missed it but what seals the line at the turbo end? Are there more o rings or seals to be changed?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Im sorry if I missed it but what seals the line at the turbo end? Are there more o rings or seals to be changed?
I don't believe we've had issues with the turbo end. That may not have a rubber seal.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I just noticed tonight that I have some oily residue forming around the oil line on my Cruze. I also noticed the feed line on mine looks a bit different than the other pics that I've seen in the threads. I wonder if there's a new/redesigned part for the line?

View attachment 130762

I also wonder if there are better O-rings that could be used to replace the OEM ones. Something made with a stronger, more temperature tolerant rubber?

I'd like to find out, I wonder if anyone has an idea what size the rings are?

Edit: Also, I'm right at 55,000 miles.
Looks like the same line, just a different angle. I don't know of any improved replacements.
 

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I don't believe we've had issues with the turbo end. That may not have a rubber seal.
It appears that the other end does indeed include double o-rings. The problem is that online parts diagrams don't show a part number for these seals, but apparently they come with the pipe assembly according to the attached drawing.

TURBOCHARGER & COMPONENTS for 2013 Chevrolet Cruze

You would never see this end leaking unless you removed the exhaust heat sheild. According to All-data, remove the heat shield, and remove both ends of the pipe and repair and replace.

It's leaks at the oil cooler, (the part the oil filter goes in on the 1.4) that looks like a chore to remove. Involves coolant drain, hose removal, and what appears to be a lot more from the book than what it looks like to remove the oil cooler. Hopefully that won't be an issue.

This turbo pipe pays 0.6hrs for the feed line, and 0.5 hrs for the return to oil pan line. Which I'm guessing is more easily seen with the heat shield off.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
It appears that the other end does indeed include double o-rings. The problem is that online parts diagrams don't show a part number for these seals, but apparently they come with the pipe assembly according to the attached drawing.

TURBOCHARGER & COMPONENTS for 2013 Chevrolet Cruze

You would never see this end leaking unless you removed the exhaust heat sheild. According to All-data, remove the heat shield, and remove both ends of the pipe and repair and replace.

It's leaks at the oil cooler, (the part the oil filter goes in on the 1.4) that looks like a chore to remove. Involves coolant drain, hose removal, and what appears to be a lot more from the book than what it looks like to remove the oil cooler. Hopefully that won't be an issue.

This turbo pipe pays 0.6hrs for the feed line, and 0.5 hrs for the return to oil pan line. Which I'm guessing is more easily seen with the heat shield off.
If I'm not mistaken, that's a banjo bolt, and typically, those use copper washers that seal through pressure. Torque spec will be important to note when putting it back together. Because of the extreme heat conditions, a rubber washer would never last that close to the turbo.

It seems that these rubber parts fail as a consequence of time, with mileage being lesser of a factor. Blue Angel would probably be able to help us find a replacement rubber o-ring, but whether or not it would last any longer than the OEM one is doubtful.

We'll worry about other sources of leaks when the time comes. For now, this is hitting a lot of people. We need someone to document a thorough tutorial on the replacement of these o-rings.
 

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I just noticed tonight that I have some oily residue forming around the oil line on my Cruze. I also noticed the feed line on mine looks a bit different than the other pics that I've seen in the threads. I wonder if there's a new/redesigned part for the line?

View attachment 130762

I also wonder if there are better O-rings that could be used to replace the OEM ones. Something made with a stronger, more temperature tolerant rubber?

I'd like to find out, I wonder if anyone has an idea what size the rings are?

Edit: Also, I'm right at 55,000 miles.
it was a feed line up date for the 2013 and up 1.4. If you've had your turbo replaced they supposed to use a "updated line" it has a heat shield around it. All the early 11/12 1.4s don't gave it..
 

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This is a pretty common failure on turbo cars. Those Orings dry out from heat cycling and being sandwiched between the hot turbo and really hot oil.

I think I did it at least twice in 100,000 miles on my old car.
Sounds like a cheap fix, Subaru use metal O rings but by 100K you usually loose the turbo from oil starvation(model year dependent) or excessive shaft play.
 

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For anyone curious on the exact steps, copied from my service manual;

Turbocharger Oil Feed Pipe Replacement

Removal Procedure


  1. Open the bonnet.
  2. Disconnect battery negative cable. Refer to Battery Negative Cable Disconnection and Connection .
  3. Remove the exhaust manifold heat shield. Refer to Exhaust Manifold Heat Shield Replacement .
    2192280.png
  4. Remove the turbocharger oil feed pipe bolt (5).
  5. Remove the turbocharger oil feed pipe hollow screw (4) and the 2 seal rings (1) and (3).
  6. Remove the turbocharger oil feed pipe (2) and the rubber seal ring.

Installation Procedure



  1. Clean the sealing surfaces.
    2192280.png
  2. Install the turbocharger oil feed pipe (2) along with a NEW rubber seal ring.
  3. Install the turbocharger oil feed pipe hollow screw (4) and 2 NEW seal rings (1) and (3). Caution: Refer to Fastener Caution in the Preface section*.
  4. Install the turbocharger oil feed pipe bolt (5) and tighten to 10 N·m (89 lb in).
  5. Tighten the turbocharger oil feed pipe hollow screw to 30 N·m (22 lb ft).
  6. Install the exhaust manifold heat shield. Refer to Exhaust Manifold Heat Shield Replacement .
  7. Connect battery negative cable. Refer to Battery Negative Cable Disconnection and Connection .
  8. Close the bonnet.
*Caution: Use the correct fastener in the correct location. Replacement fasteners must be the correct part number for that application. Do not use paints, lubricants, or corrosion inhibitors on fasteners, or fastener joint surfaces, unless specified. These coatings affect fastener torque and joint clamping force and may damage the fastener. Use the correct tightening sequence and specifications when installing fasteners in order to avoid damage to parts and systems. When using fasteners that are threaded directly into plastic, use extreme care not to strip the mating plastic part(s). Use hand tools only, and do not use any kind of impact or power tools. Fastener should be hand tightened, fully seated, and not stripped.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Looks like it doesn't make sense to replace just the o-rings. I haven't even been able to find a part number for items 1 and 3 (turbo side seal rings), but if the price is anywhere close to that of just the o-rings, it doesn't make sense to pay for those as well when the entire line including a new bolt would be just a couple of bucks more.

That said, if those are copper seals just like they are on brake calipers, they might be reusable. I don't suppose there's a GM procedure just for replacing the rubber o-rings is there?
 

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I asked to have my entire oil feed pipe replaced.....turns out the dealer techs decided to replace only the orings saying the pipe was working properly. So that being said im assuming there is a process for replacing only the orings. This summer I plan to return and this time demand the entire pipe be replaced.... I want the new protective heat shield.
 

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Im assuming feed tube inspection would be part of the procedure. Wasnt there an issue where if techs found line to be clogged to just replace whole line though. I agree with XR, just replace with new line and seals.
 
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