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2011 Chevrolet Cruze LTZ
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Discussion Starter #1
Hello CruzeTalk community,

My name is Sean-Tyler and I have a 2011 Chevy Cruze LTZ. I have been working on the removal of my cylinder head for a while, with a lot of help from previous posts here. I have encountered a possible huge problem I am hoping to receive some advice on.

I was in the process of removing my cylinder head bolts and managed to strip 3 of the 12 bolts. So I brought out the screw extractor set, drilled a hole in one of the head bolts, tapped the screw extractor into the hole in the head bolt, and began turning the screw extractor counterclockwise as it is supposed to. I knew the extractor was twisting in the right direction because I saw it threading deeper into the head bolt hole, but I ended up breaking the extractor off inside the head bolt. Obviously the head bolt has been under a lot of heat and pressure (suspected blown head gasket) to be so tightly stuck. For any of the mechanically adept: am I completely f***ed?

Here is 2 pictures of the head bolt I had drilled into and has the screw extractor broken off in. I tried drilling into the extractor afterwards, but this is extremely strong steel I have come to learn and only created the small divot in the bolt:
288740

288741



Here is the 2 other stripped head bolts:
288742
288743



Here is screw extractor set used:
288744
288745
288746


I'd greatly appreciate any help I could get in solving my problem. I am considering removing my entire engine and taking it to the machine shop for them to remove or abandoning project altogether and swapping another engine. Any ideas would be appreciated.
 

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Premium Member
2015 Chevrolet Cruze LT 1.4L Turbo
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76 Posts
The extractor set you are using looks like it's designed to remove SCREWS, not BOLTS. Also what type of socket are you using to cause that kind of damage?
Try something like this:
288749
 

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Premium Member
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1,397 Posts
I always just go straight to welding. I’m not wasting my $40 bits on someone’s engine.

If welding fails. Probably cheaper to just roll new engine.
 

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You really need to find someone with a MIG welder. Protect the head, weld a nut to the bolt, and turn it out. And take the tube of silicone away from whoever worked on that engine last!!!
 

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14 Chevy Cruze lt 1.4 automatic
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I also rounded off 2 head bolts because I was using wrong size Etorx socket. Ended up getting them out by using a regular socket. Believe it was 1/2 but don't remember. Didn't quite fit it gently tapped socket on with hammer. Other than that welding a nut would be best bet. Don't want alot of metal shavings from extractor falling in
 

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Super Moderator
2014 LT program car, Pull Me Over Red
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9,197 Posts
Buy a set of the correct sockets next time. What were you using to remove the bolts?

I am in the weld a nut on camp. This will heat up the bolt and give you something to turn.
 

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2011 Chevrolet Cruze LTZ
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2 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the replies.
The extractor set you are using looks like it's designed to remove SCREWS, not BOLTS. Also what type of socket are you using to cause that kind of damage?
Try something like this: View attachment 288749
I agree with you that the screw extractor set definitely was not enough for the cylinder head bolts I was working with, and I ended up buying a couple different extractor sets (similar to the one you listed) but could not get the correct fit as these sets came in standard or metric sizes and were not good for the external torx bolt.


I always just go straight to welding. I’m not wasting my $40 bits on someone’s engine.

If welding fails. Probably cheaper to just roll new engine.
You really need to find someone with a MIG welder. Protect the head, weld a nut to the bolt, and turn it out. And take the tube of silicone away from whoever worked on that engine last!!!
I also rounded off 2 head bolts because I was using wrong size Etorx socket. Ended up getting them out by using a regular socket. Believe it was 1/2 but don't remember. Didn't quite fit it gently tapped socket on with hammer. Other than that welding a nut would be best bet. Don't want alot of metal shavings from extractor falling in
Buy a set of the correct sockets next time. What were you using to remove the bolts?

I am in the weld a nut on camp. This will heat up the bolt and give you something to turn.
I was using the correct e12 socket to remove these bolts, I just am thinking that because of the tremendous heat and pressure buildup from my blown head gasket, and the possibility I had driven or at least started her up long enough to further make my problem worse, it ended up torquing these bolts down incredibly strong somehow. I have had an overheating issue for months with the car and ended up replacing the radiator, water pump and thermostat, water outlet housing and several hoses before landing on the head gasket issue.
I was fully prepared to try to weld a socket on with my only concern being the tight space that these bolts were in along with my inexperience with welding. I ended up taking the cams off to create more space and before I went to the welding option I ended up using a combination of the dremel and a drill to drill through the head bolt completely so that all that is left is the stud. After a long process the 3 head bolts came off, although I left quite the mess behind. Now to clean up the shavings and send to the machine shop. Thanks for the replies guys.
 

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Thanks for the replies.

I agree with you that the screw extractor set definitely was not enough for the cylinder head bolts I was working with, and I ended up buying a couple different extractor sets (similar to the one you listed) but could not get the correct fit as these sets came in standard or metric sizes and were not good for the external torx bolt.






I was using the correct e12 socket to remove these bolts, I just am thinking that because of the tremendous heat and pressure buildup from my blown head gasket, and the possibility I had driven or at least started her up long enough to further make my problem worse, it ended up torquing these bolts down incredibly strong somehow. I have had an overheating issue for months with the car and ended up replacing the radiator, water pump and thermostat, water outlet housing and several hoses before landing on the head gasket issue.
I was fully prepared to try to weld a socket on with my only concern being the tight space that these bolts were in along with my inexperience with welding. I ended up taking the cams off to create more space and before I went to the welding option I ended up using a combination of the dremel and a drill to drill through the head bolt completely so that all that is left is the stud. After a long process the 3 head bolts came off, although I left quite the mess behind. Now to clean up the shavings and send to the machine shop. Thanks for the replies guys.
yeahhh that’s kinda why I recommend weldinng.

Don’t waste a socket. Just weld a random nut lying around. Materials don’t really matter as it just needs to hold on long enough to extract. Even a sloppy weld is fine and if it breaks... I mean weld it again and try again? Not a big deal.
 
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