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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi folks! Seems like a few people here had a message saying Emission System See Owners Manual Now with a countdown in distance before a max speed limit.
Motor vehicle Car Vehicle Speedometer Automotive tire

I had absolutely no issue with the car and I got it inside the garage for a cleaning and left it inside overnight with the doors opens and a dehumidifier in the garage and fans. This morning I had the rubbers around the doors treated and wanted to put the car back outside. When I turned it on, this message was on the cluster display. I haven't open the hood nor replaced anything or add any DEF. Went inside, cleaning and that's it.

I scanned it with an OBD2 scanner and the code P2b9A is there. Cannot erase it (it comes back) and no check engine.
Hand Fluid Measuring instrument Finger Liquid

In the owner's manual, it says "In some cases this message will clear itself, indicating that the emission system was able to correct the condition." but nothing (obviously) on the error code or what the problem might be.

Being confined because of the COVID, I cannot go see a mechanic anytime soon. I am trying to get some help from you if anyone knows anything!
Font Publication Screenshot Document

Thanks! :)
 

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It’s a 2018
Ugh I hate you.

You may or may not have a DEF Quality Sensor. That is a dedicated sensor which prior years did not have. And annoyingly the 2018 simply might or might not have.

Is something wrong with it? Probably not. My guess is it got iced up and will fix itself.
But this error indicates the measured Urea % drastically changed in a single driving cycle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ugh I hate you.

You may or may not have a DEF Quality Sensor. That is a dedicated sensor which prior years did not have. And annoyingly the 2018 simply might or might not have.

Is something wrong with it? Probably not. My guess is it got iced up and will fix itself.
But this error indicates the measured Urea % drastically changed in a single driving cycle.
The fact that the car was doing really good before getting inside and kind of developed the issue while being in a 72F garage is quite weird to me.

I started the car inside with the garage door closed and the message did show up while the door was opening. I doubt the thermal shock in this situation. I hope it will fix itself but it’s been sitting outside now for 3 hours and just start it and no difference.
 

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The fact that the car was doing really good before getting inside and kind of developed the issue while being in a 72F garage is quite weird to me.

I started the car inside with the garage door closed and the message did show up while the door was opening. I doubt the thermal shock in this situation. I hope it will fix itself but it’s been sitting outside now for 3 hours and just start it and no difference.
It can take a long ass time for it to thaw. And you can get into situations where it's mostly thawed but there are ice chunks floating... Which I think is what happen. Then one of those ice chunks got in the sensor.
 

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Well, might be a 6 but I thought it was a b on the obd reader lcd screen
You would think the number 6 would have the top part of the 7-segment display illuminated, but maybe not. I think it's a number 6 because the letter b rarely (or never?) is part of the middle digit of an OBD code. Someone else more familiar with the format of the code digits can confirm, but I don't think letters come in the middle digit.
 

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You parked the car inside and ran a dehumidifier overnight to get moisture out of the car (seats and carpets), so you basically brought the atmosphere in the garage down to being bone dry. Did that do something wonky with the DPF system? Who knows?

Try topping the DEF tank of with known good quality DEF and taking it for a drive for about an hour. See if the car will run through some DEF to where it flushes out the system and gets rid of the code.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
You parked the car inside and ran a dehumidifier overnight to get moisture out of the car (seats and carpets), so you basically brought the atmosphere in the garage down to being bone dry. Did that do something wonky with the DPF system? Who knows?

Try topping the DEF tank of with known good quality DEF and taking it for a drive for about an hour. See if the car will run through some DEF to where it flushes out the system and gets ride of the code.
Will try this
 

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You would think the number 6 would have the top part of the 7-segment display illuminated, but maybe not. I think it's a number 6 because the letter b rarely (or never?) is part of the middle digit of an OBD code. Someone else more familiar with the format of the code digits can confirm, but I don't think letters come in the middle digit.
Im sure it’s a b.
Its only listed in the service manual, likely since it’s such a new code.
 

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DEF has a freeze point of -11F. If you’re going through some freeze and thaw cycles, maybe (don’t know if it’s possible?) the DEF is stratifying in different layers and concentration. If a slug of weak or strong DEF flows through a quality sensor, it could give erratic readings.

Thaw the tank by parking somewhere warm enough. Add a gallon of new, known quality fluid to mix it up. Drive and see if the code clears.
 
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