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This morning 87 E10 is $2.59/gal, diesel is still $3.89/gal. 32% delta!
 

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Just filled the car full of 87 E10 at $2.56/gal. Diesel is $3.89/gal. My car would have to get 21 mpg in the city to make diesel worth it.
 

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I just saw an article about falling gas prices. Some places could see under $2 by Christmas. The gap between diesel and gas could get rather large.
 

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Diesel fuel is also consumed by large trucks... I don't believe the fuel consumption of large trucks has changed as much as the fuel consumption of smaller gas powered vehicles.

Without trying to rub too much salt in wounds... when I did the math a few months ago, before gas prices dropped, the cost to operate a diesel Cruze was virtually identical to that of a gas powered Cruze. I had at one point really considered a diesel, for it's better power/torque , but then thought about other issues like dealing with urea tanks and such then choose not to. For me, if I could have foresaw larger price differences between gasoline and diesel, I would have never considered the diesel at all.

Stuff like this is going to make it really hard for diesel autos to ever really make it big in the USA.
 

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It's dropped about a dime in my area, while regular unleaded has fallen 50 cents or so. I cross the border to South Carolina and have been buying diesel for $3.19.

I still own my prior gasoline car, which is 14 years old and gets around 24 MPG. So gas would need to be about half the cost of diesel, before it would make better sense to drive that more than the CTD.
 

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In SC just filled my CTD with $3.40 diesel at Sunoco. 87 E10 was $2.40. 93 E10 was $2.80 That is the largest % difference I can remember. I had a 1985 300DT Mercedes for 20 years. Great car but the lack of emissions controls and 500 ppm sulfur made the exhaust very unpleasant. The sulfur dioxide content was so high it would actually cause respiratory and eye irritation inside the car when stuck in traffic. CTD owners should remember that gas Cruze models really need 93 octane for optimal performance and E0 93 cost is similar to diesel. I dislike being forced to buy Monsanto GMO corn based E10 after it damaged $1000 worth of sensors in my 2001 BMW 740i and ruined 2 lawn mowers. I pay extra to use E0 in those. My CTD is still very inexpensive to own and I plan to check out the diesel Colorado pickup when it hits the market.
 

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I have noticed the spread between gas an diesel is wider in the U.S. than here in Ontario an usually diesel is less than gas in the summer here.
from what I`ve been told diesel is cheaper to produce, if so it should be less expensive everywhere.
 

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CTD owners should remember that gas Cruze models really need 93 octane for optimal performance and E0 93 cost is similar to diesel.
Premium doesn't cost anywhere near diesel prices right now. Paid $3.08 gallon for 93 octane yesterday, Diesel was still $3.75 a gallon. Regular was only $2.64, midgrade $2.74. My car preforms fairly well on midgrade and cost per mile is much lower than premium. My cost per mile has been between 8-9 cents for the last month, probably matching most diesel cruze.

I dislike being forced to buy Monsanto GMO corn based E10 after it damaged $1000 worth of sensors in my 2001 BMW 740i and ruined 2 lawn mowers. I pay extra to use E0 in those.
93E0 is non-existent in most of the US market, 91E0 is much more prevalent. The cruze 1.4T LOVES ethanol and runs much better on 93E10 than 91E0. I will agree though for small engines especially those that sit for periods unused no ethanol is the way to go. Having tested 87,89 and 91 E0 vs E10 I will choose E10 everytime with this engine.
 

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In SC just filled my CTD with $3.40 diesel at Sunoco. 87 E10 was $2.40. 93 E10 was $2.80 That is the largest % difference I can remember. I had a 1985 300DT Mercedes for 20 years. Great car but the lack of emissions controls and 500 ppm sulfur made the exhaust very unpleasant. The sulfur dioxide content was so high it would actually cause respiratory and eye irritation inside the car when stuck in traffic. CTD owners should remember that gas Cruze models really need 93 octane for optimal performance and E0 93 cost is similar to diesel. I dislike being forced to buy Monsanto GMO corn based E10 after it damaged $1000 worth of sensors in my 2001 BMW 740i and ruined 2 lawn mowers. I pay extra to use E0 in those. My CTD is still very inexpensive to own and I plan to check out the diesel Colorado pickup when it hits the market.
Never had a problem with E10 in any car from the 80s onwards. In fact, the Cruze loves ethanol, runs better. I can get away with running 89 E10 with fine performance with temps <70F outside.

Small engines are a different story, carb jets are tiny and clog easily when the gas sits around in a 5 gallon container forever.
 

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I dislike being forced to buy Monsanto GMO corn based E10 after it damaged $1000 worth of sensors in my 2001 BMW 740i and ruined 2 lawn mowers. I pay extra to use E0 in those. My CTD is still very inexpensive to own and I plan to check out the diesel Colorado pickup when it hits the market.
Hmmm. I've been running 87 E10 in my 4 stroke string trimmers, lawnmowers, two stroke snow thrower, and all of my cars since E10 became available with no problems or issues in any of them. That's a long time and a lot of engines. I don't think the E10 is a problem.
 

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Diesel in Nova Scotia finally dropped. Went down $0.10/L


Sent from the sexy electrician
 

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This is making me angry as well. I just don't understand why it's not moving


Sent from the sexy electrician
Diesel prices topping gas by 56 cents a gallon nationally

Diesel fuel was once a less-expensive alternative to gasoline, but the roles have reversed in recent years. Diesel has become more expensive than gas, and that all but eliminates the savings from diesel's generally higher efficiency over gasoline.

The situation stems from factors including increased worldwide demand, bitter cold weather and an improving global economy, petroleum market-watchers say, and it has implications for anything that is shipped by truck or rail.

In other words, just about everything.
"(Diesel) is a big deal," said Jim Ritterbusch, an oil market industry analyst in Galena, Ill.

Across the United States on Friday, a gallon of diesel fuel cost $3.86, according to the AAA Daily Fuel Gauge Report. A gallon of gasoline was 56 cents cheaper at $3.30 a gallon. In Wisconsin, the difference was even bigger, with gasoline matching the national average price while diesel was averaging $3.91.

Consumers are increasingly paying attention.

"There are a lot more customers nowadays who weigh the pros and cons" of diesel vs. gasoline, said Brad Baker, a sales representative at Badger Truck Center in Milwaukee. "(Diesel) costs more. It never used to.

"More and more people are putting a pencil to it and saying, 'I can get by with a gasoline engine,'" he added. "We've gone through this conversation quite a bit the last three or four years for sure — more than we used to.

"It's something we deal with every day."

There are nearly 50,000 light-duty diesel vehicles — cars, SUVs and light trucks — in Wisconsin, according todieselforum.org, a trade association for companies that manufacture diesel-powered products.
Diesel vehicles are 30% to 35% more fuel efficient than gasoline-powered vehicles, according tofueleconomy.gov.

Right now, though, "All the gains you scoop up with the much better mileage, you are losing on the pump price," Ritterbusch said.


Higher global demand

Global demand for diesel is among the biggest factor driving prices higher, with U.S. refineries often exporting the fuel wherever in the world it can fetch the best price. As Europe emerges from recession and developing countries in Asia and Latin America have continued to grow, so has demand for diesel.

"Diesel exports have probably quadrupled in the past three or four years," Ritterbusch said. "It's almost a situation where gasoline has become a byproduct of this quest to produce diesel, load it on cargo ships and ship it out."
The U.S. exports about 3.5 times as much diesel as gasoline.

Ritterbusch said he's seen instances of diesel being shipped as far away as Asia.

Meanwhile, soaring heating oil use amid bitter cold temperatures this winter in the U.S. also has affected diesel, Ritterbusch said. Among refined crude oil products, heating oil is closely related to diesel fuel, and soaring home heating demands — especially on the East Coast — have led to higher prices.

"Diesel fuel is the pre-eminent fuel in the world now," said DuWayne Marshall, an independent trucker from Watertown. "When I started trucking, diesel was probably 20 cents a gallon cheaper than gasoline. But it's been on a steady climb since probably the late 1980s."

It's been worse. Diesel has fallen from its highest prices touched in 2008, he said, and it costs about $800 to fill his truck these days, compared with $1,000 a few years back.

He follows prices carefully. "I put a lot of thought into it," he said. "I have to watch my price per gallon."

As in other trucking and shipping businesses, fuel prices have forced Marshall to add fuel surcharges to every load he hauls.

The surcharges slide up or down depending on the cost of fuel.
American consumers ultimately pay those costs.

"The consumer bears much of the increase during a spike, and they receive the benefit of a drop in prices as well," said Dan McMackin, a spokesman for Atlanta-based UPS.
 

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I would think that the truckers would be getting rather upset at the growing price gap between diesel and gas. Gas continues to drop here, but diesel is still about the same. Gas is $1.05/L and diesel is $1.27/L.

Maybe its time for these diesel importing countries to build more refineries for themselves. This exporting of massive amounts of diesel is a recent development and it is costing us all by way of increased shipping costs.
 

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I would think that the truckers would be getting rather upset at the growing price gap between diesel and gas. Gas continues to drop here, but diesel is still about the same. Gas is $1.05/L and diesel is $1.27/L.
truckers make more $$ the higher the price of diesel gets....fsc ftw
 
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