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When Sherri and I arrived in Youngstown yesterday she said my car smelled hot. This isn't normal so I popped the hood to see a very thin sheen of oil across the top of the engine. Today at the Lordstown Park after our plant tour we were looking at it and one of the guys pulled the dip stick out. Turns out the lower o-ring had hardened and broken. After calling around to various dealerships I found one dip stick at Greenwood Chevrolet in Youngstown. Interesting failure - and the first one reported here.
 

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that sucks how many miles & what yr? this is another thing on my cruze bucket list. could've you just change the little rubber ring?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
87,000 miles. I could have changed the o-ring if needed. It was easier to just replace the entire dip stick. I'll see if I can find the o-ring later, giving me a spare dip stick.
 

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Let us know what size o-rings are required. I will purchase a set just in case.
 

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Did you have to purchase the new dipstick yourself or was it covered under your power train warranty?
 

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Not if that o-ring failed It would make me think the ones on the turbo oil feed tube in their even higher temperature environment could fail at an even lower mileage. If you haven't I would consider changing the turbo oil feed line.
 

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It would make me think the ones on the turbo oil feed tube in their even higher temperature environment could fail at an even lower mileage.
  • Assuming they're made of the same material.
  • The turbo rings doesn't suffer the mechanical stress that the dipstick does every time the oil is checked.
 

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I would think 600+ Fahrenheit would be much more harsh environment than any mechanical stress of removing the dip stick. Besides the fact I've seen dozens of failed oil feed line o-rings over the years on here.
 

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I would figure there is more pressure from a turbo motor. I think this is why the pcv valve cover needs to be replaced so prematurely
 

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PCV hose returns to the inlet of the turbo into an orifice that sees what is similar to a venturi type of vacuum. Crankcase at about 1000 foot altitude should show about 19"/Hg of vacuum at engine idle speeds. Can be measured at the dipstick tube with a cone type fitting to a vacuum gauge.

So if there is any pressure, would be negative.

Feel the major reason for camshaft cover failure is because its made out of plastic, do have thermoplastics that can easily handle 750*F, doubt if it is made out of these.

Another problem is using materials with different coefficients of expansion in an engine, an aluminum head has seven times the expansion of a cast iron block, never was a problem with heads when they were made of cast iron, sure is now. Good question what the thermo expansion of the plastic camshaft cover is on aluminum, mine had a crack in it. Another enemy is thermocycling, engines driven in the city for short trips have a lot more problems than engines running at long constant temperatures on the highway.

For years, O'rings were never used in engines or in AC systems, are now, another new problem that was never a problem before.



DIPSTICK SEAL

Part Number : 55594385

$3.63 Our Price $2.34


1982 GM 454 CID engine dipstick just has an unsealed metal cup welded to it. Suspect new EPA regulations want the crankcase to be at a high vacuum. Its PCV valve just plugs into a grommet on a stamped steel valve cover, with a short hose directly into the air cleaner, even at todays prices, extremely inexpensive to replace. 04 Cavalier was the same way, get ready to be robbed with the Cruze.
 

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If you put your thumb over that dipstick tube, should be feeling suction, but if its blowing oil, has to be positive pressure.

Good question as to what is causing this. Turbo is blowing high pressure air into that plastic intake manifold that also has a path for the PCV. Could expect a crack in that giving you high positive pressure.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
It wasn't power train. Cost was about $20.
 
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