Chevrolet Cruze Forums banner
1 - 20 of 43 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,152 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
How to replace front Brake Pads:

Tools required:
Jack
Jack Stand
10 mm socket to remove the caliper
C clamp to release the caliper and old pads
  1. Remove the master cylinder cap. This will release the pressure from compressing the caliper piston and the brake fluid returning to the master cylinder.
  2. Jack the car up and remove the front wheel. Using the socket, remove the bottom bolt on the back side of the caliper. No need to remove the top one that is what the caliper will pivot on. Besides the brake line gets in the way and it is attached there.
  3. Once the top bolt is removed, using the C Clamp position the C Clamp over the caliper with the “C” away from you so that it is on the back of the caliper. Tighten the Clamp using the little bar on the end of the thread to compress the pad a little. This will push the caliper piston in to allow the caliper to come free from the rotor. Pull the caliper off the rotor to let it pivot on the bottom bolt.
  4. If there are no grooves on the rotor from the pads being worn down, remove the pads and replace them with new pads. Putting the one with the squeal sensor(little metal tab) on the back side of the rotor. The pads will only slide in one way.
  5. Before trying to reinstall the caliper: Use the C Clamp push the caliper piston in all the way. This will give ample room for the new pads. Once the caliper piston is pushed back into the caliper; slide the caliper back over the pads and replace the bolt and tighten.
Repeat the same procedure for the other side.

When done, replace the master cylinder cap and lower the car. Get into the car and depress the brake pedal it will probably go all the way to the floor. This is normal. Pump the brake pedal until it becomes stiff like before. Start the car and drive the car a short distance to make sure the brakes function correctly.

The above instructions are for just replacing the pads without changing or turning the rotors.

If the rotors need to be replaced or turned, follow the above instructions but remove the bottom bolt holding the caliper in place. Remove the caliper and put it someplace secure as not to stress the brake line.
What we are going to do is remove the 2 bolts holding the caliper mount on the wheel assembly. This will allow us to remove the caliper which will just slide off the wheel studs. Once off: replace with a new if the rotor you are taking off is scored too deeply. If you have a machine shop nearby you can take the rotors there using you girlfriends car since yours is not drivable. Have them turn the rotors. When done slide the rotor back on the car and replace the caliper mounting bracket and then continue on with step 4 above.
 

·
Resident Derp
Joined
·
2,806 Posts
Might I ask for pictures? I always learn better off of visual instructions rather than written.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,490 Posts
My recommendation on this subject it to always turn the rotor just to be on the safe side I always do at work. How many mile are on your car to make you change your pads.

Sent from my Droid using AutoGuide.Com Free App
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,158 Posts
They might have needed to come off for other work, so a writeup was made. I've already ripped a set of pads off my Cruze once removing a front hub. As for why the hub needed to come off, I bunged up some wheel studs and didn't know the trick to getting the new ones into the hub while it was still on the car.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,490 Posts
They might have needed to come off for other work, so a writeup was made. I've already ripped a set of pads off my Cruze once removing a front hub. As for why the hub needed to come off, I bunged up some wheel studs and didn't know the trick to getting the new ones into the hub while it was still on the car.
There usually is a hole or a couple of holes on the back side of the hub you should be able stick your studs threw and then tighten them with either your lug nut with a couple of washer or an actual special tool made witg a bearing washer on one end, then you could turn the hub to place the next stud and so on.

Sent from my Droid using AutoGuide.Com Free App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
904 Posts
Both pins (bolts) need to be removed at some point during the job because they must be lubricated.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,490 Posts
Both pins (bolts) need to be removed at some point during the job because they must be lubricated.
True I toataly missed that use synthetic brake slide grease. Good catch goldencruze

Sent from my Droid using AutoGuide.Com Free App
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,158 Posts
There usually is a hole or a couple of holes on the back side of the hub you should be able stick your studs threw and then tighten them with either your lug nut with a couple of washer or an actual special tool made witg a bearing washer on one end, then you could turn the hub to place the next stud and so on.

Sent from my Droid using AutoGuide.Com Free App
Part of the stud needs to be ground off to make it fit into that slot. Not a lot, but a new stud still needs a date with a grinding wheel before installation if the hub is on the car. You'll see what I mean if you ever have to replace a stud.
 
  • Like
Reactions: kane

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,490 Posts
Part of the stud needs to be ground off to make it fit into that slot. Not a lot, but a new stud still needs a date with a grinding wheel before installation if the hub is on the car. You'll see what I mean if you ever have to replace a stud.
Thanks for the heads up I have run across a couple of those.

Sent from my Droid using AutoGuide.Com Free App
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,152 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
How to replace front Brake Pads:

Tools required:
Jack
Jack Stand
12 mm(honestly not sure of the size) socket to remove the caliper
C clamp to release the caliper and old pads
  1. Remove the master cylinder cap. This will release the pressure from compressing the caliper piston and the brake fluid returning to the master cylinder.
  2. Jack the car up and remove the front wheel. Using the socket, remove the top bold on the back side of the caliper. No need to remove the bottom one that is what the caliper will pivot on.
  3. Once the top bolt is removed, using the C Clamp position the C Clamp over the caliper with the “C” away from you so that it is on the back of the caliper. Tighten the Clamp using the little bar on the end of the thread to compress the pad a little. This will push the caliper piston in to allow the caliper to come free from the rotor. Pull the caliper off the rotor to let it pivot on the bottom bolt.
  4. If there are no grooves on the rotor from the pads being worn down, remove the pads and replace them with new pads. Putting the one with the squeal sensor(little metal tab) on the back side of the rotor. The pads will only slide in one way.
  5. Before trying to replace the caliper: Use the C Clamp push the caliper piston in all the way. This will give ample room for the new pads. Once the caliper piston is pushed back into the caliper; slide the caliper back over the pads and replace the bolt and tighten.
Repeat the same procedure for the other side.

When done, replace the master cylinder cap and lower the car. Get into the car and depress the brake pedal it will probably go all the way to the floor. This is normal. Pump the brake pedal until it becomes stiff like before. Start the car and drive the car a short distance to make sure the brakes function correctly.


The above instructions are for just replacing the pads without changing or turning the rotors.

If the rotors need to be replaced or turned, follow the above instructions but remove the bottom bolt holding the caliper in place. Remove the caliper and put it someplace secure as not to stress the brake line.
What we are going to do is remove the 2 bolts holding the caliper mount on the wheel assembly. This will allow us to remove the caliper which will just slide off the wheel studs. Once off: replace with a new caliper if the one you are taking off is scored too deeply. If you have a machine shop nearby you can take the rotors there using you girlfriends car since yours is not drivable. Have them turn the rotors. When done slide the rotor back on the car and replace the caliper mounting bracket and then continue on with step 4 above.
I removed my front brakes, and found some differences to what I noted before:
1: The bolt size is10 mm not 12mm DSCF0022.jpg

2: You must remove the bottom bolt to slide the caliper out of the way. They decided to use a @ 4 in brake hose mounted to a coupling directly behind the top bolt which means you need to use a wrench instead of a socket. The brake line being so short does not allow enough leeway to get the caliper out of the way
DSCF0024.jpg
3: You will not need to use a C clamp to slide the caliper out of the way until you need to compress the piston when installing the new pads
4: Here is a pic of removing the pads:
DSCF0028.jpg DSCF0030.jpg
You will notice the metal clips on top and bottom they make the pads fit very tight in the bracket so there is no need to use the "blue glue" we used to use when reinstalling. These clips and the bracket design make the fit very tight and they will go in 1 way and 1 way only and may require some maneuvering to set them back in.

Once you reset the pads you need to use the C clamp to compress the caliper piston to allow to fit back on:
DSCF0032.jpg

After removing the pads, it is a good idea to have the rotor turned of replace them. Either way you need to remove the bracket the caliper is attached to with the top bolt. Once the caliper is removed, there are 2 bolts that hold that bracket on

DSCF0034.jpg

Remove those and remove the t27(this may be a t30 as per XR's findings on the drum brakes) screw holding the rotor to the hub like the the screw(on the left between the 2 studs) holding the drum on in the rear
DSCF0038.jpg

Once the bracket is removed along with the retaining screw, the rotor is free to slide off the hub for turning/resurfacing or replacement. Don't forget to already have the new rotors or alternate transportation to the machine shop to have them turned. O'Reily's turns them for $10 ea. while you wait.

I did not need to go that far with this, I was just checking the pads for wear on mine and there was still a good 1/2 in of pad left so I reassembled. I just wanted to provide pictures for you to see what I am talking about. Other than the tightness of the pads in the bracket, it is still a simple procedure.

Hope this helps. Let me know if anyone has any questions.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
954 Posts
Holy man GM loves Torx ... Now I'm going to have to buy some :( I don't think you have to put the screw that holds the rotor on the hub back on. These tend to over tighten over time and are very hard to get out. This is just for assembly at the plant to keep the rotor on the car while the robots are doing their thing :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,490 Posts
Can you elaborate on this? What pins/bolts need to be lubricated? I'm getting ready to install new rotors and pads...I just want to be ready.

thank you!
There called caliper slide bolts or pins depending on make model of vehicle. You need to apply synthetic brake grease so the calipers can slide evenly also don't apply to much as it will attract dirt and smaller particles and can screw up stuff.

Sent From My Galaxy Note 3.
Which is bigger than my hand.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,143 Posts
Very good instructions. What are the calliper bolts torqued to? Also, torque for the rotor bracket bolts?
A small tip, I always use the old pad between the piston-pistons and the clamp (The Commodore has duel front wheel cylinders) to stop any damage or uneven pressure from twisting them. With duel cylinders or more this is essential anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
639 Posts
A small tip, I always use the old pad between the piston-pistons and the clamp (The Commodore has duel front wheel cylinders) to stop any damage or uneven pressure from twisting them. With duel cylinders or more this is essential anyway.
So true. Even worse on 4 and 6 pot calipers.

Delivered from my pigeon
 
1 - 20 of 43 Posts
Top