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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Thanks for the detailed write-up! Both OP and Patman!
LOL The OP was Patman!!!! and as of tonight, Patman has new front brakes 42K of about 90% city driving and the pads were @ 75% gone and I started hearing some noise like groaning. $45 for Advance Auto Parts Carquest Wearever Gold Pads. Car stops great again. Before I was wondering if it would and the pedal was going down pretty far!
 

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Depending on vehicle mileage, it's a good idea to loosen off the brake bleeder screws to allow
moisture absorbed fluid to exhaust from the caliper versus pushing contaminated fluid back up
to the master cylinder.....Real easy to do. Use fresh brake fluid to top up the master cylinder
(not a bottle of brake fluid that's been opened for a while as it might have absorbed moisture
over time). Make certain the caliper pins are free - clean them and re-lubricate them before
completing the service. Clean the caliper bracket to make sure it's free of scaling rust (this is
another component that makes calipers bind or stick.....

AND always follow safety precautions throughout the entire process.

Have fun!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
I was surprised when I removed the top pin, the caliper just swiveled right off and no compression with the C clamp was necessary. First set of brakes I have done without compressing the caliper. Great set up. If it wasn't so **** cold, I may go back out an grease the caliper pin as CruzeGTR suggested, but all the hardware looked good so I left it go. I am contemplating replacing my brake fluid tho (when it gets warmer). Otherwise car stops good and no problems.
 

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Didn't have to replace my pads, just cleaned, painted, and lubricated them.

View attachment 136146

Before photo of the brake clips, so why didn't I take an after photo, but looked like new again.

View attachment 136154

Before photo of the brake pad holder, was soaked in a 50-50 solution of hydrochloric acid, rinsed, wire brushed, and painter with high temperature brake paint.

View attachment 136162

These are the pads before and after cleaning, it took hammer taps to remove the pads.

View attachment 136170

Finished product, exactly not done for a show car, but for a car going back on our filthy salty roads. Before mounting the clips painted the inside with anti-seize and outside as well, with the back of the pads painted and the tips. This really helps retard corrosion that jams the pads tight. Did all four wheels, but had to clean my hands first before grabbing my camera and was on a tight schedule to get this done. Ha, need another person to take photos.

Also notice the anti-seize on the lug nut studs, ha, was a post on lug nuts falling off, never happens up here. If you don't anti-seize these studs, will break them off trying to get the lug nut off. Yeah, I saw that other rust under the car, screw it, hopeless and endless with all this damned road salt.
 

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Just completed the first front pad change on the SRi-V.
To limit the dust I fitted a set of Bendix GCT pads ($67 bay) and $2 for Bendix disc brake lubricant 6g.

Had the manual on hand, so the job was very straight forward.

Should have put the Bendix on a long time ago to reduce the dust created from the OEM pads..
 

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In Australia no-one will buy a car with rear drum brakes.

Fortunately the manufacturers and importers realise this, so we don't have to deal with antediluvian mechanical ****-ups.
Oh, but you still do.

A percentage of manufacturers still use a smaller mechanical drum brake assembly inside the rotor hub as a parking brake.
Any weight advantage with rear disc vs drum is lost with this method.

There's also brake drag with a disc. It's a minute amount though. Downhill racers were reluctant to install disc brakes on their bikes initially because of the small amount of drag.

They still put drums on heavy trucks. Truckers that travel off road (ie:salt water trucks - oil or ng drilling, etc...) kick up a lot of rocks and off road debris that damage rotors and just bounce off the outside of drums. Also, if you cook out your drum brakes on a long downhill they'll be fine after they cool off. Discs? they're probably going to be damaged.

The real disadvantange I noticed may be the ABS cyclic rate.

I was driving in the rain about a week ago. Some ghetto dumb-dumb in a [shoddy] yellow Pontiac G5 decided that she needed to be in my lane NOW! She couldn't use any of the 5 to 6 car lengths (at 45 mph) in front of me. She needed my lane position right freakin' then. I got hard into the ABS for the first time in my car. It cycles MUCH slower than my Mazda 6 did. In fact, it cycled slower than my 4 wheel disc PT Cruiser did. My newer 200S has even a faster cyclic rate than my Mazda did (inadvertent testing on black ice) I don't know if that is a GM thing or a drum thing. The ABS worked. I did not lose control and despite her best efforts, Shenehneh did not hit me. But the pedal does pulse a lot slower than any of my disc brake cars.
 

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Oh, but you still do.

A percentage of manufacturers still use a smaller mechanical drum brake assembly inside the rotor hub as a parking brake.
Any weight advantage with rear disc vs drum is lost with this method.

There's also brake drag with a disc. It's a minute amount though. Downhill racers were reluctant to install disc brakes on their bikes initially because of the small amount of drag.

They still put drums on heavy trucks. Truckers that travel off road (ie:salt water trucks - oil or ng drilling, etc...) kick up a lot of rocks and off road debris that damage rotors and just bounce off the outside of drums. Also, if you cook out your drum brakes on a long downhill they'll be fine after they cool off. Discs? they're probably going to be damaged.
My Commodore had the drum park brake, and it was also RWD with fully independent suspension. Because it was a parking brake only it still worked perfectly after 250,000km without ever being relined. I work in a warehouse where lots of really large trucks come in to be loaded and unloaded. A B double, Semitrailer with a second trailer attached, came in the other day. This truck which carried about 60 tons had disk brakes on every axle complete with ABS and EBD, so it is starting to happen, even in heavy vehicles. Even Jumbo Jets use disc brakes
 

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We don't have any shoes. I changed my pads and rotors at 27k km. I don't know what they are, but no more dust on the front wheels. Rear brakes will be next.
Yep Rear's will be next. Just waiting a little longer for the KM's to increase on current pads, as all the components on the rear brakes were replaced by Holden last year under warranty.
 

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Replaced my front disc pads. 2012 Eco has 80K miles, pads still had 50% left but it was time anyway. I can't believe how easy it was. Just make sure you have that c-clamp or similar tool to push back the piston.
 

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One thing I didn't see going over this thread. I was always under the impression that when you push the piston back in the caliper, you are supposed to open the bleed screw and let the brake fluid bleed out that way, instead of pushing old dirty fluid back up through the ABS system possibly. Kind of makes sense to me but I could be wrong. Plus if you do not do a brake fluid exchange at the same time as when you change your pads. You will then at least add fresh fluid to the system when you are all done.
 

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I am planning to change rear pads for Chevy Cruze 2012, LT 1.6......... but there seems to be 2 options for the rear pads, How can I tell which option I need for my car?

Options
Brake Size [in] 16 or Brake Size [in] 15

Thanks
Abaaba
 
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