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Cruze LT VCDi 2.0 Diesel Automatic.
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All

I got my second DPF light this morning; but with an engine yellow light as well. I burned it off, drove for 30-40 minutes at 3000rpm (4th gear out of 6 at 70 - racy but noisy LOL) and the DPF light went out.

However - the engine light is NOT out... and even after stopping the car all day and then re-starting to drive home from work, it's still lit. The engine is running the same as it always has; smooth and sweet - is the light likely due to a sticky code in the fault computer, or should I get it looked into? How urgent? Should it have taken that long to burn off the DPF?
 

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Hi All

I got my second DPF light this morning; but with an engine yellow light as well. I burned it off, drove for 30-40 minutes at 3000rpm (4th gear out of 6 at 70 - racy but noisy LOL) and the DPF light went out.

However - the engine light is NOT out... and even after stopping the car all day and then re-starting to drive home from work, it's still lit. The engine is running the same as it always has; smooth and sweet - is the light likely due to a sticky code in the fault computer, or should I get it looked into? How urgent? Should it have taken that long to burn off the DPF?
If you have a ScanGauge II than you can see what code(s) you have, or take it into service but they may charge you for this if it's out of warranty.

Sent from my LGMS631 using Tapatalk
 

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The DPF and the MIL light are not necessarily connected - in fact, given that he DPF light went out and that it stays on (in EMEA) diesels if there's a problem with the DPF system I am pretty confident it has nothing to do with the DPF.

Something else is playing up, get the code read, RSN.

Codes don't "stick" in ECUs these days unless there is a problem, or a sensor is stuck, and a stuck sensor is just as bad as whatever problem it is designed to sense.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Rather than buy the extortionately priced ScanGauge II I bought this - I am assured it's compatible with my car's computer so I should be able to read the codes tomorrow.

Thanks for your help guys.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
By the way: help me out here... MIL? RSN?

Thanks
 

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RSN = real soon now, like asap !
MIL = malfunction indicator lamp

I was going to say I use Torque Pro with a Wi-Fi obd2 adapter to read codes or the SCG2. Both work fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
OK so I may never know... the light went out. LOL. I'm still getting the OBD2 and I can look and see if it maintains a log of past codes... But I'm glad it was temporary in the end.

Thanks for the code translation LMAO
 

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The code should still be in the computer and able to be read. Usually takes 50 drive cycles or so for them to clear out on their own.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
OK here's a thing... Check out this code. I'm glad I got the device! It's seriously put my mind at rest about my engine's health.

Thanks for all your help guys.

Product Text Font Screenshot Web page
 
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Ive learned that the differential pressure sensor on mine sort of acts as a DPF regen alert. Lights at the beginning, disappears at the end.
 

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[h=2]DTC P2463[/h][h=3]DTC Descriptor[/h]DTC P2463 00: Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) Soot Accumulation Malfunction

DTC P2463 11: Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) Soot Accumulation High Input

[h=3]Circuit/System Description[/h]The diesel exhaust after-treatment system consists of an under hood pre-catalytic converter and an underbody catalytic converter. The underbody catalytic converter also consists of the main diesel oxidation catalyst and the coated diesel particulate filter. One of the main purposes of the diesel particulate filter is to collect particulates from the engine exhaust in order to minimize discharge of soot to the atmosphere. The soot particles accumulate in the channels of the diesel particulate filter and are burned off at regular intervals through a process called regeneration. This prevents the diesel particulate filter from clogging. The ECM commands the diesel particulate filter regeneration after calculating various vehicle conditions such as diesel particulate filter pressure difference, exhaust gas temperature, engine oil quality, engine speed, etc. Excessive accumulation of the soot in the diesel particulate filter can cause a drop in the engine performance. During regeneration, additional fuel is injected via multiple post injections in order to increase the exhaust gas temperature. During this period, the diesel particulate filter temperature is raised to approximately 600掳C (1112掳F) and the accumulated soot is oxidized or burned off into carbon dioxide (CO2).

The diesel particulate filter pressure sensor measures the level of soot deposit in the diesel particulate filter. The diesel particulate filter pressure sensor is connected to the diesel particulate filter with pressure pipes/hoses. The ECM performs a regeneration when excessive soot level is detected in the filter.
[h=3]Conditions for Running the DTC[/h]
The engine is running.
The DTC runs continuously when the above condition is met.
[h=3]Conditions for Setting the DTC[/h]The ECM detects that the particulate mass in the diesel particulate filter is greater than 50 grams.
[h=3]Action Taken When the DTC Sets[/h]DTC P2463 is a type A DTC.
[h=3]Conditions for Clearing the DTC[/h]DTC P2463 is a type A DTC.

DTC P2463 is a type A DTC.
[h=3]Reference Information[/h][h=4]Schematic Reference[/h] Engine Controls Schematics
[h=4]Connector End View Reference[/h] Component Connector End Views
[h=4]Electrical Information Reference[/h]
Circuit Testing
Connector Repairs
Testing for Intermittent Conditions and Poor Connections
Wiring Repairs
[h=4]DTC Type Reference[/h] Powertrain Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) Type Definitions
[h=4]Scan Tool Reference[/h] Control Module References for scan tool information
[h=3]Circuit/System Verification[/h]
  1. Ignition ON, observe the DTC information with a scan tool. Verify that no other DTCs are set.
    If any other DTCs are set, refer to Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) List - Vehicle for further diagnosis.
  2. Verify the correct fuel type is used. Refer to Fuel System Specifications .
    If the incorrect fuel type is used, refer to Fuel System Cleaning .
  3. Engine running, observe the scan tool DPF differential pressure sensor parameter. The reading should be within 0-10 kPa (0-1.5 PSI).Note: Observe the scan tool distance since last diesel particulate filter regeneration data parameter. Do Not perform a diesel particulate filter regeneration if it has been performed recently.
    If not within the specified range, perform a diesel particulate filter regeneration.
  4. Operate the vehicle within the Conditions for Running the DTC to verify the DTC does not reset. You may also operate the vehicle within the conditions that you observed from the Freeze Frame/Failure Records data.
[h=3]Circuit/System Testing[/h]
  1. Ignition OFF, inspect the hose/pipes to the Diesel Particulate Filter Pressure Sensor for leaks, or restrictions.
    If a condition is found, repair as necessary.
  2. Ignition OFF, disconnect the harness connector at the B154 Diesel Particulate Filter Pressure Sensor.
  3. Test for less than 5 鈩 between the low reference circuit terminal 2 and ground.
    If greater than the specified range, test the low reference circuit for an open/high resistance. If the circuit tests normal, replace the K20 Engine Control Module.
  4. Ignition ON, test for 4.8-5.2 V between the 5 V reference circuit terminal 1 and ground.
    If less than the specified range, test the 5 V reference circuit for a short to ground or open/high resistance. If the circuit tests normal, replace the K20 Engine Control Module.

    If greater than the specified range, test the 5 V reference circuit for a short to voltage. If the circuit tests normal, replace the K20 Engine Control Module.
  5. Verify the scan tool DPF differential pressure sensor voltage parameter is greater than 4.8 V.
    If less than the specified range, test the signal circuit for a short to ground. If the circuit tests normal, replace the K20 Engine Control Module.
  6. Install a 1 A fused jumper wire between the signal circuit terminal 3 and ground. Verify the Diesel Particulate Filter Pressure Sensor voltage parameter is less than 0.5 V.
    If greater than the specified range, test the signal circuit for a short to voltage or an open/high resistance. If the circuit tests normal, replace the K20 Engine Control Module.
  7. Ignition OFF, connect the harness connector at the B154 Diesel Particulate Filter Pressure Sensor.
  8. Ignition ON, verify the scan tool DPF differential pressure sensor voltage parameter is between 0.45-0.55 V.
    If not within the specified range, replace the B154 Diesel Particulate Filter Pressure Sensor.
  9. If all circuits test normal, test or replace the Diesel Particulate Filter.
[h=3]Repair Instructions[/h]Perform the Diagnostic Repair Verification after completing the diagnostic procedure.
Exhaust Pressure Sensor Replacement
Exhaust Particulate Filter Replacement
Control Module References for ECM replacement, programming and setup
[h=3]Repair Verification[/h]Ignition ON, observe the scan tool DPF accumulated soot mass parameter. The parameter should be less than 10 grams.
If greater than the specified range, perform a Diesel Particulate Filter service regeneration. Refer to Exhaust Particulate Filter Cleaning .
 

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And:
[h=3]Emissions Related DTCs[/h] [h=4]Action Taken When the DTC Sets - Type A[/h]
The control module illuminates the malfunction indicator lamp (MIL) when the diagnostic runs and fails.
The control module records the operating conditions at the time the diagnostic fails. The control module stores this information in the Freeze Frame/Failure Records.

[h=4]Conditions for Clearing the MIL/DTC - Type A or Type B[/h]
The control module turns OFF the MIL after 4 consecutive ignition cycles that the diagnostic runs and does not fail.
A current DTC, Last Test Failed, clears when the diagnostic runs and passes.
A history DTC clears after 40 consecutive warm-up cycles, if no failures are reported by this or any other emission related diagnostic.
Clear the MIL and the DTC with a scan tool.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
LOLyup. BTW I don't have the additional fuel injection cleaner... I have a light. When light comes on, I run hot for a while. First time only took 9 minutes; second time took 40 minutes! I'm going to do a precautionary 10 minute burn every month from now on.
 
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