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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone else had issues with P2457, EGR cooler performance? My 2017 has had that locked in for a couple of months. Dealership has parts on order, but only has gaskets so far, the cooler is apparently on national backorder. Either GM has horrible logistics people and didn't have spares on hand, or they depleted the supply, perhaps a combination of the two... But it seems likely others it the have seen this but I have not seen it on any of the forums.

The good news is that the car appears to be running fine with no detectable problems.
 

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I'm waiting over 1 week with the EGR cooler assembly on backorder. It was an intermittent check engine light that brought me to the dealership and GM technical says replace the entire cooler assembly.
 

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I get the feeling GM is doing some serious belt tightening right now. Bean counters are probably tightening the supply chain - and going too far. (Reducing inventory too much).

That being said, I am planning on cleaning the egr and saw a new egr valve cost $85 on trunkmonkeyparts.com. So I ordered one to swap it out. I will then clean the other one and keep it in the shelf.

It showed up in two days with gaskets I also ordered.

For the egr cooler itself, you really only need to replace if the internal water jacket is leaking coolant. They are replacing them to save time. They could be cleaned. Just in case someone gets in a jam....

Jeff
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'm waiting over 1 week with the EGR cooler assembly on backorder. It was an intermittent check engine light that brought me to the dealership and GM technical says replace the entire cooler assembly.
That sounds pretty much exactly like my situation. It began as intermittent, and got looked at the first time after it had cleared on its own, but was in historical. Second visit it was still locked in, and dealer got GM tech to say replace the cooler, that was the end of July, parts have been on order since then... I do monitor the car periodically when I drive it, I can see the EGR inlet temp and outlet temp, I don't see anything that different from the other two 1.6L Diesel cars I have, I'm not sure what parameter is setting the code. MPG continues to be great, and regen frequency is typical for that car. There doesn't appear to be any coolant loss... so not a big concern, but I'd like the light off at some point (if it were out of warranty I'd clean the cooler and reset the code myself).
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I get the feeling GM is doing some serious belt tightening right now. Bean counters are probably tightening the supply chain - and going too far. (Reducing inventory too much).

That being said, I am planning on cleaning the egr and saw a new egr valve cost $85 on trunkmonkeyparts.com. So I ordered one to swap it out. I will then clean the other one and keep it in the shelf.

It showed up in two days with gaskets I also ordered.

For the egr cooler itself, you really only need to replace if the internal water jacket is leaking coolant. They are replacing them to save time. They could be cleaned. Just in case someone gets in a jam....

Jeff
Good plan, Amazon appears to have the Gen 2 EGR valve as well: https://smile.amazon.com/ACDelco-55570005-Original-Equipment-Valve/dp/B06Y5LQSF9/ref=au_as_r?_encoding=UTF8&Make=Chevrolet|47&Model=Cruze|16206&Year=2017|2017&ie=UTF8&n=15684181&s=automotive&vehicleId=8&vehicleType=automotive

and found the EGR cooler temp sensor, but no cooler..
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Interesting, Rock Auto has the cooler, apparently IN STOCK for $176.99, yet GM can't get one?! Talk about horrible logistics people.
 

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The differential pressure hoses I ordered are on backorder too. Not that I expected the dealer to have them in stock but for a year-old car it's pretty concerning how many things I'm seeing listed on backorder (after I had to wait 5 weeks for a turbo earlier this year). I wonder if it's happening with non-diesel cars too ... I remember during the turbo wait I did some Googling and found similar complaints from people with all sorts of GM vehicles.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The differential pressure hoses I ordered are on backorder too. Not that I expected the dealer to have them in stock but for a year-old car it's pretty concerning how many things I'm seeing listed on backorder (after I had to wait 5 weeks for a turbo earlier this year). I wonder if it's happening with non-diesel cars too ... I remember during the turbo wait I did some Googling and found similar complaints from people with all sorts of GM vehicles.
It may be worse for GM, but I'd bet it's similar for pretty much all new cars. While the new cars are being built, the parts are mostly consumed for the new production cars, the OEMs, to be LEAN, don't carry much inventory as it has inherent costs. Also, being new, there are no aftermarket producers, yet.. so that puts us in this situation. What I find perplexing is that I can order the cooler at Rock Auto with a one day delay, but the dealer can manage to get it via GM in a month, that is quite telling of a specific problem within the GM organization.

Ironically, I have a 1962 Land Rover. Parts are both easy to get, and relatively cheap for that car, but they did produce that model for almost 4 decades (in some parts still produce it, the defender), so the aftermarket has all kinds of options. That puts a bit of contrast on the parts supply for new cars, that and a particular model is in production for about 3 years, tops in most cases, but the OEMs, can and should do better.

For those hoses, you might be able to measure the ID/OD and just get a fuel hose cut to length and use that pending the molded hoses.. just a thought. I'm not sure of the exact hose config on the Gen 2, but on my Gen 1 it's a pretty straight shot from the metal lines to the sensor, a piece of cut fuel line would certainly work on that car.
 

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For the egr cooler itself, you really only need to replace if the internal water jacket is leaking coolant. They are replacing them to save time. They could be cleaned. Just in case someone gets in a jam....
I'm going to straight-up ask the dealership to give me the factory-installed EGR cooler assembly. I'll clean it up and put it on a shelf to keep as a spare.
 

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It may be worse for GM, but I'd bet it's similar for pretty much all new cars. While the new cars are being built, the parts are mostly consumed for the new production cars, the OEMs, to be LEAN, don't carry much inventory as it has inherent costs. Also, being new, there are no aftermarket producers, yet.. so that puts us in this situation. What I find perplexing is that I can order the cooler at Rock Auto with a one day delay, but the dealer can manage to get it via GM in a month, that is quite telling of a specific problem within the GM organization.

Ironically, I have a 1962 Land Rover. Parts are both easy to get, and relatively cheap for that car, but they did produce that model for almost 4 decades (in some parts still produce it, the defender), so the aftermarket has all kinds of options. That puts a bit of contrast on the parts supply for new cars, that and a particular model is in production for about 3 years, tops in most cases, but the OEMs, can and should do better.

For those hoses, you might be able to measure the ID/OD and just get a fuel hose cut to length and use that pending the molded hoses.. just a thought. I'm not sure of the exact hose config on the Gen 2, but on my Gen 1 it's a pretty straight shot from the metal lines to the sensor, a piece of cut fuel line would certainly work on that car.
Hadn't really thought of the lean thing, but that makes sense ... I understand the benefits of lean manufacturer but just the term brings back bad memories having worked in a lean factory for a year, ha. Parts are also much easier to get for my 70s/80s Mercedes ... I'm restoring the 87 and it's crazy what I've been able to get from the factory ... like full rocker panels, from Germany, which arrived at my dealer in less than a week ... this isn't even a valuable car people regularly restore like a roadster. Even my 2005 diesel Jeep hasn't been that bad, though the aftermarket helps.

For my hose I think I'm going to try putting a little "patch" around the ripped area and a different clamp on it. I'm not entirely sure it even has the right clamp, as between four hose ends there are three clamp types. I was hoping to get the new ones in partly just to get a good look at their design before tampering with anything, but it isn't going to hurt to swap out the clamp (knock on wood).
 

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I don't have any solutions, but can offer the minor consolation I also have the same codes and indefinitely back-ordered parts. Such is the life I have chosen as owner of a modern diesel.

At least we can still drive our cars (seemingly without issue) unlike the Silverado HD guys that were facing the same parts availability issues with DEF heaters and turbos a year ago.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I don't have any solutions, but can offer the minor consolation I also have the same codes and indefinitely back-ordered parts. Such is the life I have chosen as owner of a modern diesel.

At least we can still drive our cars (seemingly without issue) unlike the Silverado HD guys that were facing the same parts availability issues with DEF heaters and turbos a year ago.
I think it's a problem with GM overall and not just Diesel, then again FCA had serious problems with parts for a steering recall on my truck that was so bad the government forced them to offer a buyback. That DEF heater also affected Gen 1 Cruze, but by the time mine failed and needed a replacement they had managed to get caught up and had the parts.
 

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In order avoid some of these in the future several things come to mind....

Keep your air filter very clean. I would change it every year. I was reading up on egr codes for excessive flow through egr and one thing that can cause this is a restricted air filter. More flow would dirty the cooler more quickly.

Someone here mentioned to me that running an additive with a cetane booster would be a good idea to reduce soot buildup and help avoid dpf issues. This would also help keep the egr clean. So always run good quality fuel and possibly add an additive with a cetane booster. Our motor was designed for euro market where cetane is higher. For high quality fuel Costco has top tier rated diesel. And Chevron is good. I would say this is particularly important if you are doing alot of city driving.

You can run an additive focused on keeping the egr and dpf clean. These use a catalyst to lower the temperature at which the soot will ignite. This has two effects. One is that you get a cleaner burn with less soot as the catalyst creates a more complete combustion process - so both the egr and dpf will be kept clean. The other is that the catalyst will allow for more effective passive and active regeneration of the dpf. With the catalyst lowering the ignition point of the soot from 600 to 400 degrees C, any soot deposited in the dpf will also have the catalyst intermixed with it. So passive regens will initiate more easily. This is where you are driving and exhaust gas temps get high enough where soot in dpf ignites and burns off. When active regenerations occur, the catalyst will make active regens more effective - shorter in duration and more complete. As a side benefit, shorter active regens will reduce fuel consumption.

There are two additives used for dpf cleaning catalysts. The first is ferrocene which has been used in diesels in mining for many years to reduce soot smoke from diesels in mines. A ferrocene based additive that can be ordered in the united states is liqui moly dpf protector. The other is cerium oxide and is a more recent development. Cerium oxide has a benefit that it can be used all the time in a lower dose to keep the egr and dpf clean. I haven't been able to find anything in the u.s. using this - so I have contacted a distributor for xenum nex10 in europe (nice guy by the way) and shipping some over. If anyone would like to do a group buy, let me know and I will add a few bottles to my order for reduced shipping etc.

thanks,
jeff
 

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Messaged my dealer again after my above post. Still on back order from just over a week ago, but they also said they had a customer who has had his on order since July 5th of this year. 😂😭
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Messaged my dealer again after my above post. Still on back order from just over a week ago, but they also said they had a customer who has had his on order since July 5th of this year. 😂😭
Similar story on mine. Car seems to drive without any issue and no change in MPG or DEF use.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
In order avoid some of these in the future several things come to mind....

Keep your air filter very clean. I would change it every year. I was reading up on egr codes for excessive flow through egr and one thing that can cause this is a restricted air filter. More flow would dirty the cooler more quickly.

Someone here mentioned to me that running an additive with a cetane booster would be a good idea to reduce soot buildup and help avoid dpf issues. This would also help keep the egr clean. So always run good quality fuel and possibly add an additive with a cetane booster. Our motor was designed for euro market where cetane is higher. For high quality fuel Costco has top tier rated diesel. And Chevron is good. I would say this is particularly important if you are doing alot of city driving.

You can run an additive focused on keeping the egr and dpf clean. These use a catalyst to lower the temperature at which the soot will ignite. This has two effects. One is that you get a cleaner burn with less soot as the catalyst creates a more complete combustion process - so both the egr and dpf will be kept clean. The other is that the catalyst will allow for more effective passive and active regeneration of the dpf. With the catalyst lowering the ignition point of the soot from 600 to 400 degrees C, any soot deposited in the dpf will also have the catalyst intermixed with it. So passive regens will initiate more easily. This is where you are driving and exhaust gas temps get high enough where soot in dpf ignites and burns off. When active regenerations occur, the catalyst will make active regens more effective - shorter in duration and more complete. As a side benefit, shorter active regens will reduce fuel consumption.

There are two additives used for dpf cleaning catalysts. The first is ferrocene which has been used in diesels in mining for many years to reduce soot smoke from diesels in mines. A ferrocene based additive that can be ordered in the united states is liqui moly dpf protector. The other is cerium oxide and is a more recent development. Cerium oxide has a benefit that it can be used all the time in a lower dose to keep the egr and dpf clean. I haven't been able to find anything in the u.s. using this - so I have contacted a distributor for xenum nex10 in europe (nice guy by the way) and shipping some over. If anyone would like to do a group buy, let me know and I will add a few bottles to my order for reduced shipping etc.

thanks,
jeff
Great information, thanks. I might be interested in that additive. I'll look up the details. Having 4 Diesel Cruze vehicles I would certainly put it to use. The Gen 1 is throwing the DPF D/P sensor code again, which I'm almost certain is caused be intake crud/soot residual oil build up.

Avoiding that would be useful.

Adding to the back story on mine, the issue is happening on my wife's car that has fewer miles than the one I drive.. but it has an average time between regens quite a bit higher miles than mine. Despite more miles on mine, not having this problem. So I can guess a a few differences that might explain: 1) I drive more spirited, harder accelerations. 2) mine is a manual, higher final drive engine RPM than the 9sp auto, thus higher exhaust flow rates.

One consistent theme: Diesels, especially with emissions, have fewer problems when used at higher loads, temperatures, and spirited driving.

The HD diesel truck emissions problems were much worse, given that these were sized for heavy loads and towing, but often driven unloaded they were often not even attaining open thermostat temperatures, I observed this with my Cummins powered Dodge after coolant flush and replacement... i had I had to drive at highway speed for almost an hour unloaded just to get to an open thermostat so I could get all the air out!
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
There is a seller on eBay for nex10. It appears this comes from Russia, is that correct? That would explain why it's hard to find any website that will open without errors...
 

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I was reading up on egr codes for excessive flow through egr and one thing that can cause this is a restricted air filter.
I find this a stretch of my imagination. Yes, theoretically if you reduce the flow of clean intake air you might increase the amount of EGR drawn into the intake. But isn't the EGR valve variable/adjustable? It's not just a snapped open/shut valve? If so, the ECU should be controlling the flow of EGR to modulate it to an acceptable level. Less clean intake air means dial that EGR valve closed a little bit more so the EGR flow is reduced.

Someone here mentioned to me that running an additive with a cetane booster would be a good idea to reduce soot buildup and help avoid dpf issues.
That was me. It's something I read up on a VW TDI website maintained by a garage that specializes in VW diesels. I don't know how accurate their advice is but if you already have a source of good quality fuel (California where their cetane requirements are higher, or anywhere that you can get a good biodiesel blend) I cannot imagine a cetane additive helping. My local oil company that sells B11 fuel quotes about 46-47 cetane for their diesel. There are plenty of places around me selling B20 fuel in summer months, and I imagine their cetane numbers are similar. For an engine that requires 40 cetane as a minimum, 45-47 is more than adequate for clean combustion.
 

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The HD diesel truck emissions problems were much worse, given that these were sized for heavy loads and towing, but often driven unloaded they were often not even attaining open thermostat temperatures
This is my personal opinion: The USA has too many douchenozzles buying HD diesel pickups when they don't need them.

Do you use a truck for work? Do you use a truck for SERIOUS work? If you do something like towing close to the maximum towing rating for modern trucks (that can get above 30,000 pounds!), sure, go ahead and buy that diesel engine option. In fact, it's required to get the maximum tow package on any Ford, Ram, or GM pickup.

Do you tow a bass boat, camper, or maybe a work trailer? If you're towing under 10,000 pounds, that can be accomplished with a 1/2 ton pickup from the big 3. You can get a Ford F-150 EcoBoost (or the 5.0 gasoline V-8) that will cost at least $15,000 less than a diesel pickup and it will tow what you want just fine. Save that purchase price up front and that's a lot of fuel you'd have to save to come close to paying back that diesel engine option on the 3/4 ton pickups.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
This is my personal opinion: The USA has too many douchenozzles buying HD diesel pickups when they don't need them.

Do you use a truck for work? Do you use a truck for SERIOUS work? If you do something like towing close to the maximum towing rating for modern trucks (that can get above 30,000 pounds!), sure, go ahead and buy that diesel engine option. In fact, it's required to get the maximum tow package on any Ford, Ram, or GM pickup.

Do you tow a bass boat, camper, or maybe a work trailer? If you're towing under 10,000 pounds, that can be accomplished with a 1/2 ton pickup from the big 3. You can get a Ford F-150 EcoBoost (or the 5.0 gasoline V-8) that will cost at least $15,000 less than a diesel pickup and it will tow what you want just fine. Save that purchase price up front and that's a lot of fuel you'd have to save to come close to paying back that diesel engine option on the 3/4 ton pickups.
Well certainly people buy all kinds of things they don't need, but in a free country, that is quite normal. That said, I in fact made the switch to Diesel pick up when I was towing a small RV trailer with a 1/2 ton gas pick up at it's tow limits. That was a rig that would barely do highway speed, sometimes not even hold highway speed. Then traded in for a diesel, sure more than I needed, but back in 2005 there were no 1/2 ton Diesel options. That rig got over 15MPG, which is a massive improvement, and could hold highway speed even going up an mountain pass! If you want to do significant travel I'm such a rig, then the diesel makes sense. Some of the new 1/2 ton Diesel options also make sense... I try to be cautious to not judge the choices of others when it doesn't affect me, and in part because it's impossible to know all their reasons for the choice they made.
 
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