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Electrical Burning Smell AFTER Highway Driving

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My daughter has a owned a 2015 Cruze LTZ for 5 years and it now has about 88,000 miles on it. Over the past 3 months it has developed an electrical burning smell (like an electrical wire is getting WAY too hot) in the cabin AFTER you've been driving 60 MPH+ for more than 5-10 min and then come to a complete stop. The smell only occurs after you follow this specific pattern, which we do a lot because we live outside of town just off the interstate. There's no smoke, no warning lights, no indications of anything wrong, just the smell which only lasts about 5 min. The problem is easily reproduceable and several people have smelled it, so I'm pretty confident it's not just her or my imagination. It's starting to worry me because it seems to be getting worse. I have taken the dash and center console panels out of the car and searched for a scorched wire or connector and I can't find anything.

So, has anyone else ran into this problem or have any ideas on what to try next? I'm at my wits end, and could really use some guidance. Thanks in advance.

Shawn
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What makes you think it's electrical? Highway driving will get anything hot, especially the turbocharger and exhaust. Try turning on recirculate mode and see if the smell still comes in the cabin; if it doesn't, it's probably coming from under the hood.
 

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What makes you think it's electrical? Highway driving will get anything hot, especially the turbocharger and exhaust. Try turning on recirculate mode and see if the smell still comes in the cabin; if it doesn't, it's probably coming from under the hood.
I worked as a car audio installer in college, so I'm pretty familiar with the smell of electrical wire insulation/plastic that got a little too hot. However, I will try the recirculate mode next time to see if you could be correct. Thanks for the idea.

I would think the smell would be coolant or exhaust as well. Normally if a wire gets hot, it fries. Which would lead to a one time lingering smell, not a cyclic smell like you are describing.
Agreed. However, my thought is that a circuit is carrying a very heavy amp load for a very short period of time, maybe a second or two, after the car travels at highway speeds. This could be enough to get the wires hot enough to generate a smell, but not hot enough to fail. My worry is, how many cycles can the system take before it does fail. I can't think of a system within the car that would generate a heavy amp load after traveling at highway speeds and then stopping(?). I will admit that I don't know much about new cars. If it doesn't have a carburetor on it (or even better, more than one) I'm lost.
 
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