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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For whatever reason, I can't seem to search the forums here at work (just get blank results), so this may have already been asked before but anyway....

Driving into work this morning, around 1.5 miles from our house, I was following my wife to work (we work at the same place, but take two cars as I generally leave earlier), I rounded the corner onto one of the main roads we take, which is a 50mph speed limit, to see my wife's hazards on, and the Cruze absolutely crawling. I drove around her and pulled into the parking lot thankfully right there and waited for her to slowly make her way into the parking space next to me. The engine fan was on absolutely maximum overdrive holy-**** mode.

She said the car gave her the "Engine Power Reduced" and "Diesel Engine Shutdown" screens, followed by "Engine Oil Life 0%" (not the "Change Engine Oil Soon" screen we get at startup - she had an oil change appointment at 4PM today). After turning the car off, the fan kept going at max. I had her start the car back up after a minute or two, and saw the same messages, and after about a minute of idling the car turned itself off, fan still blasting. Eventually the fan slowed down and turned off, a minute or so after she turned the key off, exited and locked the car.

She rode in with me to work, convenient that we have the ability to do that, but we'll be leaving around lunch and working from home in the afternoon. Anyway, I wanted to brainstorm what on earth the vehicle determined was so important that it could have caused a potentially fatal collision if someone were to have rear-ended her. There's no way Oil Life should even be able to cause that (especially with synthetic oil) - if it can, then I'm going need to have a discussion with some of my friends at GM - and escalate this, as that is absolutely unacceptable.

But I feel like it is likely something else. Now, there was no mention of Emissions System - and those are normally accompanied by a countdown anyway. And it really should not have been trying to regen that early into the drive (She drove about 3 hours in total on Saturday - almost all freeway - so it had plenty of time to do one then), but man that fan blasting reminded me of one. I have Torque/Bi-Scan, anything I should look for to see if it, for whatever reason, decided to **** up and interrupt one and cause this? Or would we see another message.

Any thoughts?
 

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Car believes that the engine has overheated.

When was the last time you checked the coolant level?

What modifications have you made to the vehicle? Any tunes, etc.?
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'll check for a coolant leak/coolant level when I drop my wife off at the car. Can't say I've checked it recently, but it hasn't had an issue with running even close to hot, well, ever. I'll ask her if she noticed if the coolant temp was super high.

The car is totally stock in regards to the powertrain. No tunes or anything. CAI is still sitting in the box it was shipped in, haven't gotten around to installing it (probably a good thing, just for convenience of not having to prove it didn't cause anything).
 

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Do you check oil on every fill up? An oil problem will cause overheat, and perhaps that is the issue. Modern cars will shut down to prevent catastrophic internal engine damage.

Don't assume synthetic oil will never have a problem. Fuel dilution is always a potential problem for these cars, seen as increasing oil level.

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
My wife fills it up almost every time, since it's her car, so no, I don't.

It's only a few hundred miles since it hit 0%, which is usually around 7400-7500 miles, but I'd have to check. As far as she remembers, the coolant gauge wasn't hot, but I doubt she paid attention to that. I'm not sure the vehicle could physically overheat in that short amount of time, anyway, so I wonder if a sensor could be at fault.

Guess I won't know until I pull codes. I will try resetting the oil life to see if that does anything, as well.
 
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Condition/Concern

Since 2010 all GM vehicles have been equipped with the oil life monitor (OLM) system
The monitor calculates the percent of oil life remaining, based on 3 pathways

The OLM starts its calculation for all pathways after the first 50 miles to account for marshalling and time before sale. Subsequently, calculations begin immediately after each reset.

Recommendation/Instructions
Oil Life Monitor Calculation Pathways:
1. Engine revolutions- Oil life starts with a fixed number of revolutions and will decrease with each revolution. Cold / hot coolant temp readings have multipliers that reduce engine revolutions pathway quicker depending on how far from the normal oil temperature the vehicle is operating.
Note: If engine coolant temp gets above 260F, engine overheat condition, the oil life will go to 0%.

2. Mileage from last reset – Starting with MY 2013, the OLM is capped at 7500 miles for all GM powertrains except the Volt. In perfect conditions a vehicle would reach 7500 miles from the last reset and the oil life left would be 0%.

3. Time- This pathway is a liner function, a fixed decrease in oil life for a given time after the oil life is reset. The oil life will drop to 0% after 1 year regardless of the amount of engine revolutions or how many miles since the reset.

Note: The Volt uses a 2 year timer instead of 1 year. It also uses the engine revolution counter. It does not use the mileage pathway to count down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So that kind of makes sense then - it thinks it has overheated (I doubt it did) - so that's why it came up and said "Engine Oil Life 0%" and why the fan was on Hardcore-mode.
 
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I have a 2012 MY13 Holden Cruze diesel, so oil life may differ to the US diesel. I have just done an oil change after 8,000km and 12 months. The oil life was at 61%. I have found that both the engine fans, car has 2 fans, are really loud after switch off when the car is doing a DPF regen. This is not a problem unless the DPF light is burning, then you just keep driving above 2,000rpm till it goes out. (I believe the US cars don't use this light).
 

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My wife fills it up almost every time, since it's her car, so no, I don't.

It's only a few hundred miles since it hit 0%, which is usually around 7400-7500 miles, but I'd have to check. As far as she remembers, the coolant gauge wasn't hot, but I doubt she paid attention to that. I'm not sure the vehicle could physically overheat in that short amount of time, anyway, so I wonder if a sensor could be at fault.

Guess I won't know until I pull codes. I will try resetting the oil life to see if that does anything, as well.
I have the same issue with my wife not wanting to check oil as well, so I try to do pre-emptive fill-ups for her so I can be sure it gets done, and my sons are trained to do it when they are with her.. not having any luck getting the daughter to do it!

I'd advise never lettting that oil monitor go to zero... but that aside, yes an oil problem can lead to a very rapid engine overheat. On my first car, many years ago, it had a broken guage line.. that caused low pressure and it ran out of oil, and all in less that 3 miles. It got really hot, and was quite loud as well. I plugged the leak, topped of the oil and set out again, thinking perhaps I was OK, given the very short run time involved.. I was wrong. In that short time it had spun a connecting rod bearing. It went about 10 miles, now not leaking any oil, but the bearing was making enough heat to over heat the engine coolant, and it got very, very loud as the connecting rod was basically boring out a smaller diameter on the crank shaft.

From this experience, I never push my luck on oil and oil changes, I'd preffer to do them on the early side than to find that kind of engine damage. That car was a cheapo, and the new crankshaft cost more than the car was worth.. so I used it for parts and got another cheapo car.

I'm hoping yours is not a catastrophic problem, but running the oil past the change interval is something I would never do.. based on my experience.

On the plus side, GM (and most OEMs) have done well to have the cars system's cause an engine shut down, as it did in your case to protect the engine. A friend of mine had an oil change done at a quick lube place, and they did not tighten the filter.. which later came loose on a long trip, and on the highway, it ran out ALL of the oil.. his car shut down fast enough to prevent any damage, my older car was a 1979 model, none of that technology existed then. In your case the good news may be the engine systems protected you from the worst, we can hope for that to be the case.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
All righty, spent about 15 min with the car while my wife called AAA to get the tow truck out, prior to heading home so I could get some while she waits on the tow truck - I'll go pick her up and drive her to the dealer so I can give them the run down of everything.

Anyway - turning ignition on (but not starting), no abnormal messages. Started the car, let it idle for a few minutes, drove it around the parking lot, let it idle a few more...nothing, worked fine. Coolant temp seemed to be acting like it always has. I checked coolant level prior to starting it, and it seemed a bit low - but I don't know for sure considering there appears to be no Cold/Hot markings on the surge tank at all. It was at the lowest strength rib.

I also pulled up Torque/Bi-Scan. It has the two codes we've had for months that come and go - P20E2 and P20E4 (which seem to point to EGT #2 having some problems, as those are correlation codes between 1/2 and 2/3, however I noticed two new codes: P2428 (EGT Too high bank 1) and B2AAA (which, from what I can find, is some kind of ghost code nobody can see to decipher). Bi-Scan also shows "[GMX] Reduced Engine Power Reason (History): High Temperature", so that confirms it was a high-temp shutdown.

So that begs the question - could a false EGT sensor reading cause the high-temp limp-home?
 
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All righty, spent about 15 min with the car while my wife called AAA to get the tow truck out, prior to heading home so I could get some while she waits on the tow truck - I'll go pick her up and drive her to the dealer so I can give them the run down of everything.

Anyway - turning ignition on (but not starting), no abnormal messages. Started the car, let it idle for a few minutes, drove it around the parking lot, let it idle a few more...nothing, worked fine. Coolant temp seemed to be acting like it always has. I checked coolant level prior to starting it, and it seemed a bit low - but I don't know for sure considering there appears to be no Cold/Hot markings on the surge tank at all. It was at the lowest strength rib.

I also pulled up Torque/Bi-Scan. It has the two codes we've had for months that come and go - P20E2 and P20E4 (which seem to point to EGT #2 having some problems, as those are correlation codes between 1/2 and 2/3, however I noticed two new codes: P2428 (EGT Too high bank 1) and B2AAA (which, from what I can find, is some kind of ghost code nobody can see to decipher). Bi-Scan also shows "[GMX] Reduced Engine Power Reason (History): High Temperature", so that confirms it was a high-temp shutdown.

So that begs the question - could a false EGT sensor reading cause the high-temp limp-home?
Hmm, it appears that yes, the EGT might cause the high temp shutdown. The coolant tank does have a full cold mark, it's not easy to see, but its there, and it is at the seem of the tank, near the top, so yes, your coolant tank is low. My 2015 seems to lose a tiny amount of coolant, ever since new, and I've had it looked at when still under warranty. They could not find a leak.. it still has the UV dye added to assist in finding a small leak. It would appear you have some coolant loss, and if that tank is that low, it could have sucked in an air bubble.. and it might have been an actual coolant temp issue in addition to the EGT.

What concerns me, you have worn out oil, which gets thin, and more thin when it gets diluted with fuel as part of post injection for regen, and to keep up EGTs for the emmissions system. If you have oil leaking by in the turbo, it can be overfueling the engine and be part of that high EGT. Did you check oil level, and what was the level?

I should also point out, it is not a good idea to ignore an EGT temperature code, if the computer is not getting an accurate EGT for regen, it could be doing an inadequate regen, or even an over hot regen. The EGT probes are used to control the temperature in the exhaust during regen, it's actually a pretty narrow temperature band, and it's just below where the DPF materials can be damaged.. we are talking 1200F, not much above that and the structural materails begin to melt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Well, even if the coolant is at that lower line - that was a cold reading. It's the surge tank, so it will only go up when it is hot, so I'm not too concerned just yet - I have more Dexcool here at home that I can add, if the dealer doesn't while it is there.

The oil isn't that worn out - we've run it to 0% every single time without issue. I'm not too concerned about that, seeing as people have gone far longer without issue on other oils. The GM stuff isn't nearly as good as AMSOil or anything, but I'm quite sure it's not junk, either. And no I wasn't able to check the level, as the engine wasn't warm, so I could not get an accurate reading if I had.

The EGT code has thus far only been correlation of the 1 and 3 sensors to sensor number 2 - meaning sensor number 2 is the culprit. The other two sensors work still, so it should not be a massive issue, and I've watched them while (my wife was) driving, and did not see anything out of the ordinary. It's possible that EGT2 could be why fuel economy is a little lower as of late. But one of them definitely pegged the engine enough that it caused the shutdown - but I'd bet large sums of money it wasn't the actual coolant temp (whether it was sensor or not remains to be seen, but it cannot feasibly have heated up that fast, especially being a cold-blooded diesel).

It's at the dealer now and my wife has an '18 LT Sedan courtesy car, so they can take their time. Would love if it's something covered under warranty.
 

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Please keep us posted on what the service department finds on this issue.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
Absolutely, will do. They should be able to get to it tomorrow morning - but like I said, we have a new Cruze to use in the meantime, so my wife gets to drive something different for a little bit - and something that isn't full of dog hair.
 

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Will be interested to find out the problem. I am not at all concerned about oil going to zero. I have done it once. In the manual it says you have up to 400 miles when it hits zero. I seriously doubt in a few minutes the car was actually over heating, the sensors just made it look that way is my guess.
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Will be interested to find out the problem. I am not at all concerned about oil going to zero. I have done it once. In the manual it says you have up to 400 miles when it hits zero. I seriously doubt in a few minutes the car was actually over heating, the sensors just made it look that way is my guess.
Oh does it say that? I'd guess it is right around 500-550 over or so. The dealer couldn't get the car in for a week for an oil change, otherwise we'd have had it done last week. I was going to do it myself with the Euro L and filter in the basement, but the forecast called for rain all week - so of course I planned on that, and it was sunny every day, haha.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
Well...this sure looks oddly similar: https://gm.oemdtc.com/8426/14-e-316...engine-stalls-in-idle-2009-2015-opel-vauxhall

If EGT2 needs to be replaced, it doesn't look too bad to do, given it is right on the front of the DPF - shouldn't be too bad to get a wrench on - and it's only $40 for the sensor.

I'm thinking that since it has a P20E2 and P20E4, the common sensor between the two is EGT #2, since that was the only one that seemed to not be consistent between the three on Bi-scan.
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
So, the dealer gave me a call this afternoon with the diagnosis. As I thought, the EGT #2 sensor was on its way out, likely getting closer to out than it was previously. This caused the car to become unable to regen on its own this last time - likely causing the EGTs to spike as it tried (this last part is my guess as an engineer). So, in short, EGT #2 needs to be replaced, and the car needs to be forced to do a regen to clear everything out.

Overall, the total cost is $4XX (because of course neither of these things is powertrain, rather, emissions, with its pidley little warranty), I told them just to go ahead with it. By the time I get parts, and assuming that the bi-scan app can force a regen in the method that the car is requiring, my wife will be without a car for a week, so I felt it best just to have them do it - plus, it is warrantied for a year at least. I'm also wondering if the EGT sensor's funky behavior caused the small drop I've seen (or at least think I've seen, it could be entirely in my head) in overall fuel economy, perhaps regenning more frequently that it should.
 

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If I read this correctly, moral of the story is the EGT #2 can just ‘go bad’ at anytime without warning?

That would really bite getting stuck in the middle of my desert commute, well over 110F and 80 miles from the nearest Chevy dealer......ugh.
 
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