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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

My 14' turbo lt exhaust is gurgling at idle. Basically glug, glug, glug out the exhaust.

Once it is driven it goes away and then comes back.

Additionally I am going through coolant, to the point where it needs to refilled every 2-3 days. It is winter here now. There are no leaks found. I see a tiny bubble on the thermostat housing seal. I have a new one to install and am not sure if I should also replace the water pump at the same time. I replaced the coolant reservoir to start and there is less loss now.

The car is parked on a hill, exhaust downhill.

Anyone have any idea if this is something to be worried about, or how to fix?

I cannot find any information on this specific issue and no codes are being thrown.

I just spent a ton replacing sensors and the turbo also.

Thanks.
 

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2015 Chevrolet Cruze LT 1.4L Turbo
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Pull out some spark plugs and check for coolant in the cylinders.
 

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2015 Chevrolet Cruze LT 1.4L Turbo
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I would perform a cooling system pressure test. That will tell you if there is an external leak. If you can't find an external leak, it's almost gottaa be either a head gasket or heater core.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I would perform a cooling system pressure test. That will tell you if there is an external leak. If you can't find an external leak, it's almost gottaa be either a head gasket or heater core.
OK, thanks. After I pulled and replaced plugs it stopped gurgling, rpm's are a bit higher also. Not sure how long that will last, or if that offers insight into the problem. Do you think it's safe to drive for a while with this issue?
 

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2015 Chevrolet Cruze LT 1.4L Turbo
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OK, thanks. After I pulled and replaced plugs it stopped gurgling, rpm's are a bit higher also. Not sure how long that will last, or if that offers insight into the problem. Do you think it's safe to drive for a while with this issue?
Loosing that much coolant, I personally, would stop driving it until you find and repair the cause. Overheating can cause a lot of damage. Also keep an eye on the engine oil. If it's milky in color that's a sign there moisture in it.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
OK, thanks. After I pulled and replaced plugs it stopped gurgling, rpm's are a bit higher also. Not sure how long that will last, or if that offers insight into the problem. Do you think it's safe to drive for a while with this issue?
Loosing that much coolant, I personally, would stop driving it until you find and repair the cause. Overheating can cause a lot of damage. Also keep an eye on the engine oil. If it's milky in color that's a sign there moisture in it.
It's weird that I can drive 100-200 km's with no loss, but if I sit somewhere idling it loses it. I found a manual test kit online, will try that, see then come back if I can't solve it. Thanks!
 

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2015 Chevrolet Cruze LT 1.4L Turbo
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It's weird that I can drive 100-200 km's with no loss, but if I sit somewhere idling it loses it. I found a manual test kit online, will try that, see then come back if I can't solve it. Thanks!
You welcome.
 

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Check oil for coolant. Priority 1 there.

a “Glug glug” is almost always 1 or more cylinders not getting enough fuel. Or a spark plug which has just completely failed, but this would cause codes and an overheated cat. Which could be happening... So check for signs of that.

Otherwise it sounds like a failed head gasket to me.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Update. I drove around and no loss when driving with heat on, it's -7 Celsius now. Nothing in oil or plugs, all looks fine. No oil loss has ever occurred. I did however look underneath and noticed between the wheel just in front of the front of driver side door there is coolant drop. The drops are coming out of the skinny U shape frame holes around where you might place the jack for the car. Inspecting everywhere else there are no leaks. Could this be leaking from somewhere slowly?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Further update... I have now found the only visible coolant leak at driver side front bumper through the little plastic grill underneath the headlight. It must be leaking a bit more. I am going to take bumper off soon and am waiting on a pressure tester. As far as I can tell no issue with head gasket, plugs, heater block etc. Not sure what is leaking there yet.
 

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Hi,

My 14' turbo lt exhaust is gurgling at idle. Basically glug, glug, glug out the exhaust.

Once it is driven it goes away and then comes back.

Additionally I am going through coolant, to the point where it needs to refilled every 2-3 days. It is winter here now. There are no leaks found. I see a tiny bubble on the thermostat housing seal. I have a new one to install and am not sure if I should also replace the water pump at the same time. I replaced the coolant reservoir to start and there is less loss now.

The car is parked on a hill, exhaust downhill.

Anyone have any idea if this is something to be worried about, or how to fix?

I cannot find any information on this specific issue and no codes are being thrown.

I just spent a ton replacing sensors and the turbo also.

Thanks.
If its affordable replace it all water pump,belt, and thermostat housing. It is all junk compared to the newer replacement parts. It solved alot of my coolant leaks
 

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2014 LT program car, Pull Me Over Red
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Hi,

My 14' turbo lt exhaust is gurgling at idle. Basically glug, glug, glug out the exhaust.

Once it is driven it goes away and then comes back.

Additionally I am going through coolant, to the point where it needs to refilled every 2-3 days. It is winter here now. There are no leaks found. I see a tiny bubble on the thermostat housing seal. I have a new one to install and am not sure if I should also replace the water pump at the same time. I replaced the coolant reservoir to start and there is less loss now.

The car is parked on a hill, exhaust downhill.

Anyone have any idea if this is something to be worried about, or how to fix?

I cannot find any information on this specific issue and no codes are being thrown.

I just spent a ton replacing sensors and the turbo also.

Thanks.
Here are a couple of items to ponder:

I have been looking into a blown head gasket on my PT Cruiser and this is what I have figured out so far as to deciding if it is blown:

When the gasket fails it can do so in five different ways.
  • Allows coolant to leak into the engine oil – milky or frothy oil.
  • Allows coolant to leak outside of the engine block – wet block or a sickly-sweet smell or smoke.
  • Mixes combustion gasses into the cooling system (radiator) – bubbling / spitting out of cap.
  • Allows combustion gasses/pressures to transfer between two cylinders– rough idling.
  • Allows engine oil to leak outside of the engine block - wet block or smoke if hot.
Confirming a blown head gasket
  • Are you loosing coolant without indications of a leak?
  • Is the oil on the bottom of the oil filler cap foamy or milky?
  • Is there water in the oil or is it milky colored?
  • Do you have white exhaust smoke?
  • Are there bubbles coming out of an open radiator cap?
  • Are there bubbles coming out of the overflow or surge tank?
  • Perform a pressure test on the cooling system – does it hold at least up to the psi on the radiator cap? With the spark plugs removed, can you see any coolant on the pistons? Is there a white chalky appearance to the plugs?
  • Once the system is pressurized, how long will it hold the pressure?
  • Perform a compression test on each cylinder and compare readings – a lower reading could indicate a gasket leak.
  • Still not sure, perform an exhaust gas test on the coolant.

OR

When you removed the plugs, you say you did not see any coolant, how did the piston tops look? If they were squeaky clean, you are burning coolant. To be sure, buy a cheap endoscope and look again.

Tips to ensure no misfires occur:

Remove the coil pack. If the boots are stuck on, use a small screwdriver or pick with some dielectric grease on it to go around the outside of the boot and then possibly the inside of the boot to help aid in removal.

Remember to (p)re-gap your plugs to .028, (0.24 if tuned)

Set gap with the black portion of this tool.



To increase the gap size bend the ground strap up to the desired height. DO NOT LET THE GAPPING TOOL TOUCH THE IRIDIUM CENTER ELECTRODE OR PORCELAIN.

Measure the gap with feeler gauges.



Throw this away.





Torque to 18 ft-lbs with no anti-seize on the threads of a stock type plug.

Ensure the boots have no rips/tears or holes in them, lightly coat them with dielectric/silicone grease and make sure the resister springs are clean and not caught up in the boots when you install them.

If the plugs look bad, consider these:

-BKR8EIX-2668 (iridium plugs), ~$25, expect ~10-15k regaps on these, ~40-50k overall life.
-BKR7E-4644 (nickel/copper plugs), ~$8, expect 15-25K out of these plugs, with a regap or two required at 5-8k intervals on stock tune.

Read Hesitation Gone! for more info on the plugs.


A good replacement coil is the MSD Blaster OEM Replacement Coilpack 8236
 

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Discussion Starter #14
If its affordable replace it all water pump,belt, and thermostat housing. It is all junk compared to the newer replacement parts. It solved alot of my coolant leaks
Yes, thanks for the advice. Have a new thermostat and housing, replaced reservoir already. Will replace belt and water pump when the snow melts. Much appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Here are a couple of items to ponder:

I have been looking into a blown head gasket on my PT Cruiser and this is what I have figured out so far as to deciding if it is blown:

When the gasket fails it can do so in five different ways.
  • Allows coolant to leak into the engine oil – milky or frothy oil.
  • Allows coolant to leak outside of the engine block – wet block or a sickly-sweet smell or smoke.
  • Mixes combustion gasses into the cooling system (radiator) – bubbling / spitting out of cap.
  • Allows combustion gasses/pressures to transfer between two cylinders– rough idling.
  • Allows engine oil to leak outside of the engine block - wet block or smoke if hot.
Confirming a blown head gasket
  • Are you loosing coolant without indications of a leak?
  • Is the oil on the bottom of the oil filler cap foamy or milky?
  • Is there water in the oil or is it milky colored?
  • Do you have white exhaust smoke?
  • Are there bubbles coming out of an open radiator cap?
  • Are there bubbles coming out of the overflow or surge tank?
  • Perform a pressure test on the cooling system – does it hold at least up to the psi on the radiator cap? With the spark plugs removed, can you see any coolant on the pistons? Is there a white chalky appearance to the plugs?
  • Once the system is pressurized, how long will it hold the pressure?
  • Perform a compression test on each cylinder and compare readings – a lower reading could indicate a gasket leak.
  • Still not sure, perform an exhaust gas test on the coolant.

OR

When you removed the plugs, you say you did not see any coolant, how did the piston tops look? If they were squeaky clean, you are burning coolant. To be sure, buy a cheap endoscope and look again.

Tips to ensure no misfires occur:

Remove the coil pack. If the boots are stuck on, use a small screwdriver or pick with some dielectric grease on it to go around the outside of the boot and then possibly the inside of the boot to help aid in removal.

Remember to (p)re-gap your plugs to .028, (0.24 if tuned)

Set gap with the black portion of this tool.



To increase the gap size bend the ground strap up to the desired height. DO NOT LET THE GAPPING TOOL TOUCH THE IRIDIUM CENTER ELECTRODE OR PORCELAIN.

Measure the gap with feeler gauges.



Throw this away.





Torque to 18 ft-lbs with no anti-seize on the threads of a stock type plug.

Ensure the boots have no rips/tears or holes in them, lightly coat them with dielectric/silicone grease and make sure the resister springs are clean and not caught up in the boots when you install them.

If the plugs look bad, consider these:

-BKR8EIX-2668 (iridium plugs), ~$25, expect ~10-15k regaps on these, ~40-50k overall life.
-BKR7E-4644 (nickel/copper plugs), ~$8, expect 15-25K out of these plugs, with a regap or two required at 5-8k intervals on stock tune.

Read Hesitation Gone! for more info on the plugs.


A good replacement coil is the MSD Blaster OEM Replacement Coilpack 8236
Thanks for the advice. Everything engine wise looks fine. I found a corroded clamp that fell apart with a small leak after removing the bumper and put a new hose clamp on that is holding (screw clamp). Now am getting p0599 which I think is thermostat, luckily I bought housing and thermostat and will replace soon.
 

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2014 LT program car, Pull Me Over Red
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Experience dictates that the problem usually lies in a loose or corroded electrical connector or the electrically operated thermostat itself is at fault. Occasionally, the ECM fails, but is the least likely cause.
A loose or corroded connector on the thermostat
A coolant leak will cause the code to set
The thermostat itself has failed
A short or open has occurred in the wiring harness between the computer and thermostat
The ECM has failed
Read more at: P0599 Thermostat Heater Control Circuit High Code
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Experience dictates that the problem usually lies in a loose or corroded electrical connector or the electrically operated thermostat itself is at fault. Occasionally, the ECM fails, but is the least likely cause.
A loose or corroded connector on the thermostat
A coolant leak will cause the code to set
The thermostat itself has failed
A short or open has occurred in the wiring harness between the computer and thermostat
The ECM has failed
Read more at: P0599 Thermostat Heater Control Circuit High Code
Thanks for this, I read elsewhere to replace thermostat and housing which I have purchased. Will check the rest. Coolant is no longer going down, so I think the leak itself is fixed. This car has cost quite a bit to fix, dealer even stole the new screws that I provided to them on turbo fix and used old corroded ones, not happy with GM so far. My past vehicles were under warranty. Thanks again!
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Experience dictates that the problem usually lies in a loose or corroded electrical connector or the electrically operated thermostat itself is at fault. Occasionally, the ECM fails, but is the least likely cause.
A loose or corroded connector on the thermostat
A coolant leak will cause the code to set
The thermostat itself has failed
A short or open has occurred in the wiring harness between the computer and thermostat
The ECM has failed
Read more at: P0599 Thermostat Heater Control Circuit High Code
I replaced thermostat and housing, the error is gone now. I got gas and car almost stalled upon starting it after filling the tank (that's new). Hopefully it's good for a while now.
 
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