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I've been reading into changing the ATF in my cruze lately and have decided I want to try to change it every 40k or so. However I'm not mechanically savvy whatsoever and I don't think I should attempt this myself. I hear a lot of bad things about flushes and it seems to be what all places are telling me they will ONLY do and to do it or nothing at all. My main question is should I have them flush it at a local auto shop (about $140 for Dex 6). Or not trust it and have the dealer flush it, or just find a dealer that will drain and fill?
The #1 bad thing you hear about flushes is because people who already had transmission problems went and had a flush done and their transmission broke afterward. The key phrase was "people who already had transmission problems." They think that the problems are caused by the fluid so they go change it. If you wait till the fluid is shot badly enough to cause the problems, it's already too late.

Get it flushed. If you can afford it and know a shop that doesn't mind you bringing your own fluid, run AMSOIL Signature Series ATF as it shifts smoother and is guaranteed for 2x of GM's severe service interval of 45k miles.

http://www.cruzetalk.com/forum/113-...l-efficient-automatic-transmission-fluid.html
 

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Sounds good, so I shouldn't have to change it again until 90k or so from the change? Do you have any other recommendations on fluid changes or routine maintenance? I change my engine oil every 5k with synthetic blend other than that and what I've been recently reading about the transmission fluid flushing I don't know of any other maintenance. I don't trust my dealer when it comes to recommendations on standard maintenance. They don't really have the care or need to maintain the car or make it last like I do.
If you flush AMSOIL Signature Series Fuel-Efficient ATF, you will be guaranteed with a warranty go another 90k miles on that transmission before it needs to be serviced again.

Shoot me a PM if you want information on pricing, as we have wholesale pricing options available for that big of an order. To get a complete flush, you'll need 12-16 quarts depending on which shop does the work.
 

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General Motors specifically recommends AGAINST a flushing process of any sort......I might add that EVERY domestic manufacturer recommends against the proceedure.

I cannot speak for the imports but wouldn't be surprised if they make the same recommendation.

If the manufacturer felt that flushing was a viable service, they would provide machines......no domestic does.
The only flushing machines available are those made by aftermarket companies and dealers that have them were sold the 'Hype'

The actual flushing is occuring in your wallet......

Your car, your call.

Rob

There is only one time a flushing process is called for and that is to flush the trans cooler after a catastrophic trans failure.....the trans is not connected to the machine for that service and actually a formal flushing machine is not required.....they just want fresh fluid hand pumped both ways through the cooler.

I added this cause I hit the save button too soon.
Two drains and refills will replace 70-75% of the old fluid, and some dealers are still performing the "flush." It is important to understand just what a modern "flush" refers to. The definition I use refers to a 100% replacement of the fluid. Generally, this involves idling the car and allowing the internal pump to cycle old fluid out while the machine measures and fills in new fluid at the same rate.

Using this method is not only a far more effective fluid replacement method but it also leaves absolutely no chance for damage of any kind as no force or solvent is used.

It can be performed in your garage...if you could get the cooler line off...

Since the fluid is contaminated with at best only wear metals and at worst with corrosion inhibitors as well and will be fairly well oxidized by that point, I'd prefer to get 100% out over 70-75%.
 

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There is no 'pan' to drop on this trans......a drain bolt, a fill hole, and a rather huge ball screen type filter that lives within the case halves, designed to filter successfully for the life of the trans.

I often wonder if that filter, or any internal filter, is why 'flushing' is not recommended.......maybe the potental of dislodging debris that is harmlessly sitting in a corner (such as the normally sheared bits of clutch material and bits of metal) could foul the filter and present a flow restriction???

Admittedly a WAG but seems quite feasable.

Rob
The filter is nothing more than a mesh screen that traps large particles. The rest are all suspended in the fluid, which is why the OE fluid degrades so quickly. As long as a machine does not force pressure through the system and the internal pump is used, there's no risk of dislodging debris.
 

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Is there no magnet in these transmissions?
There might be one somewhere. Not sure if the drain plug is magnetic or not. Still, not a whole lot of metallic wear should occur. I don't believe the clutch plates are ferrous but correct me if I'm wrong.
 

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The modern "flush" is incorrectly termed as such as it is vastly different from the pressure forced flushes of the past.

The machine is only there to make the process cleaner. The internal transmission pump pumps the old fluid out while the machine pumps the new fluid back in at the same rate.

Someone please explain to me how it is preferred to perform two drains and refills that replace at best 75% of the old fluid over this method because all I'm hearing thus far is anecdotal evidence and horror stories.

Why would you want to have 25% old fluid as opposed to 100% new fluid? Do you drain your engine oil, then put 1 quart of it back with the new oil? Of course not, so why is anyone advocating that effectively the same be done with our transmissions, which are also under warranty for 5 years/100k miles?
 
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