Chevrolet Cruze Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
191 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

I have repaired my transmission cooler lines for 6 dollars by buying a 3 foot length of 3/8ths TOC hose and hose clamps (which I already had).

First of all, the reason the original cooler lines leak is because they are poorly designed. You will see in the pics that there is no bump that the flex hose pushes over on the steel line.. Just some shallow grooves. We will be using one of the swaged bumps on the steel lines that act as a stop for the aluminium ferrule.. I.e pushing the hose over that swage and using a hose clamp.

I did not have to remove the battery tray, instead I dropped the three bolts from the top engine mount on the drivers side.. then passed a rope through the hole, made a loop then pulled up on the engine mount with a ratchet strap passed over a beam above the engine bay in the shop. As the engine mount is secured in a flex rubber mount, the rope will flex the mount upwards and provide enough of a gap to pass through the steel line that connects to the rear of the transmission. There in enough clearance when the engine drops down a little (yes I did put a trolley jack under the transmission) it provides enough clearance to reach the connection on top of the tranny.

You need to peel off the original aluminium ferrules after cutting through the side with either a multi tool or a hacksaw.. You don't have to be super careful as the swage under the hose (that secures the ferrule from slipping off the steel line) is too large in diameter to push the rubber hose over.. So you will grind this down but DON'T damage the ferule right next to it as this one you will need to keep.

Also note my own solution for the line seperator's/ anti-vibration clamps. You will not be able to re-use the old ones (not enough room) so I present to you what we do on airplanes to prevent hoses and wire harnesses from chafing on each other just using a small piece of hose and a tyrap. I may go back and put a small piece of bicycle inner tube under the tywrap to make sure it does not groove the hose over time. But you get the idea anyway.

Note in image 5663 I have put the where the original hose goes compared to the bare steel pipe. You will cut the pipe right next to the two adjacent swages, leaving both of them on the pipe. The first swage (now on the very end of the pipe) needs to be ground down so it is smaller the next swage.. easy to do on a grinding wheel... The tube pushes over (takes some effort) the two swages and clamped on the other side. oil the pipe liberally!

I ran the engine for 10 minutes and there were no leaks.

Time to flush/change the ATF tomorrow.

Frank
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
191 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
More pics

See if this works...

First pic shows where the old seperator clamp was. As the old clamp now appears where the rubber hose is you can't use it because the hose is too fat (previously it attached to the steel tube)... The hose clamp still has to be slid into position.

The second pic shows the new seperator clamp and you can just see the hose clamp.. Sorry its dark out and hard to see..:)

You can see the bulge in the hose where the hose has been pushed over the swage bulge in the steel tube.

Note that where there is a double swage.. you cut the steel pipe just before that.. then grind down the diameter of the first swage because its way to large for the hose to slide over.

I would suggest this method of attachment is better than the original hoses!
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
191 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Another pic of the hoses and line seperator from underneath.

There are two factory hose seperators.. this is the home made lower seperator. Note the tape to make sure the tywrap does not eat into the wall of hoses. They hardly move so this should not be a problem in any case.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
191 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I had a few private questions about exactly where to cut the old lines to secure the new hose.

Hopefully this sketch will help.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
191 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Hi all,

I have about 40,000 miles since I did the hose replacement. So far I have had zero problems and no leaks as I expected.

Definitely superior to the $300 hose replacement.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top