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Hi everyone! Unfortunately I just found this forum and under bad conditions. My 2011 1.4L Cruze LT was recently taken over by flood waters. I really feel as though my insurance is giving me the run around so I thought I'd ask for some opinions.

The flood occurred last Thursday, almost 1 week ago. The car would not power on until today, at which point the mileage showed a zero and the airbag lights were on. Based on the report from the venue staff, shortly after the parking lot flooded, my car was the only one whose horn was blowing, radio was blaring, wipers were wiping and every light, interior and exterior were on. The insurance estimate is a joke, valued at 5k for a car with a 3rd party value of 8300. The diminished value was 250... seriously, 250.

I'm of the opinion that the car is worthless. The estimate doesn't cover replacing the carpet, they're saying it only need to be cleaned, dried and deoderized. My 2 year old has severe asthma. The carpet alone is a mold being ground. It only takes moisture, 60% humidity and temps between 40 & 110 degrees to produce mold.

Does anyone here agree that this car should be a total loss or are there any believers that this car can be fully restored without further issues?
 

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Flood cars are almost always "totaled" simply because there are way too many unseen issues that crop up down the road.
 

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How high did the water get? The insurance company might have a point if the car was otherwise functional, but you've got issues that point to more than just drying out. If a airbag deploys, that will frequently total a car due to the cost of replacing it.

$250 might cover cleaning, but it isn't going to go far for repairs.

And what insurance company is stating this?
 

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The air bag main control harness and computer is located in the console behind the passenger side plastic. This is right on the carpet/frame of the car.

If the carpet under the mats is wet, one can argue that was submerged. This means that main Air bag control computer got water on it. There's 10 airbags, 4 seat belt pretensioners, and passenger presence sensor circuits all coming into this control module.

There's a lot of cost for an insurance company to replace.

A friend of mine had a car fixed, keep documentation of everything. The insurance company put $5,000 into actually fixing the car, gave it back, and later had to total it paying full market value. In this case the insurance company would have come ahead by just totaling it upfront.

Which is what I'd fight for.
 

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If you can possibly afford it, run screaming into the night from this car. It may run OK after the carpets are cleaned/replaced, but I'd bet lunch that it will have future problems that will be hard to trouble shoot and costly to fix. A dealer may take it in on trade and sell it directly to a wholesaler, but you won't get much on the trade in.

My Brother-In-Law had a car that suddenly rusted out around the suspension mounts a couple of years off the showroom floor. His attorney discovered it, and many other cars like it, were submerged in a flooded holding yard. After a few letters between the lawyer and the manufacturer, it was repurchased and taken immediately to a crusher.
 

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A flooded car is a write-off and should be avoided like the plague.

Clearly Allah was not smilingly kindly upon your house.

Consider it an act of God: take your loss and move on.
 

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Consider it an act of God: take your loss and move on.
And let the insurance company off the hook? No.

The car has serious problems - likely totaled. The insurance company is not owning up to that. THAT'S the problem.

Yes, walk away from the car - but make the insurance company pay.
 

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I concur.
 

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So gang, what should Godawgs (OP) do to get the insurance company to see the errors of their ways? I'm thinking it should be taken to a repair shop for an estimate. Make sure they take pictures of everything that got submerged.

No doubt the insurance company is going by what their adjuster is saying, they need to see a different authoritative source. Once the bill gets high enough, they'll total the car.
 
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A second estimate (opinion) from a qualified shop would be essential. I think it's going to take an attorney to pressure the insurance company to do what's right. I had an issue with an insurance company of someone who hit me and they refused to pay. My insurance company went after them with their attorneys and got restitution, two years later.
 

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I work at a body shop, oddly enough we had a 2012 Cruze come in (flood car). It was here for almost 3 months (wiring harness problems). Took out the entire interior, swept, dried, cleaned, and repaired the carpet. Cleaned out the whole interior, and replaced every harness, sensor, and module inside the body of the car. Insurance paid for everything, car had 72K water marks halfway up the door panels. I'm honestly surprised the insurance company repaired it. Good luck op. Oh and the car sat for a week and never ran until the last week it was here.
 

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That's 72 thousand miles and water marks half way up the doors, right? Not 72 thousand water marks. Hee Hee.
 

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I work at a body shop, oddly enough we had a 2012 Cruze come in (flood car). It was here for almost 3 months (wiring harness problems). Took out the entire interior, swept, dried, cleaned, and repaired the carpet. Cleaned out the whole interior, and replaced every harness, sensor, and module inside the body of the car. Insurance paid for everything, car had 72K water marks halfway up the door panels. I'm honestly surprised the insurance company repaired it. Good luck op. Oh and the car sat for a week and never ran until the last week it was here.
And that car will still have massive electrical problems not far down the road...if it doesn't rust out long before because there are a lot of cavities water (and any silt type crud with it ) that's impossible to clean and flush out...and that WILL rust out starting there.
 

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For us to say if it will or will not is not a legitimate answer. Yeah we cleaned out the best we were able to. We were doing what the insurance company was wanting us to do. I myself didn't want to fix it because I don't want the company that I work for name on it.

I'm a degreed Electronic Engineer. I actually AM qualified to state it WILL have electrical issues in the future...a LOT of them. Long before the average car can expect them and in much higher numbers. Electrical connections in cars are not gold plated on both male and female ends nor are electronics coated in epoxy for water proofing.

Yes...I have no doubt you did the best job you could do....fact is no human could reasonably be expected to return it to the same condition as one never submerged. Particularly if its been submerged for a length of time. The corrosion has started even if its not yet visible. No amount of wiping can reverse that. Water will wick up into the wiring between the strands from the ends and remain there a long time corroding wires as well, particularly if they were in standing water.
 

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While there are reasons I can't go into detail of everything I've worked with since college....a lot of it has exposure to a lot of conditions...plus I've been a world class gearhead that's done almost all his own work the last 40 years. Except what was covered under warranty.

Plus Look at my sig file....those are just my current old vehicles...lots of experience dealing with electrical issues in older vehicles.....of course most Didn't have computers etc...which will be orders of magnitude worse down the road.
 

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I would get a second estimate and fight for the insurance company to total the car. Another thing to consider is the title. I don't think we know what state this car was titled in.

A significant flood in Minnesota I believe marks the title as flooded, just like salvage. The insurance company may want to fix it and keep the title clean, because typically placing a mark on the title acknowledges significant damage occurred.

Maybe your state has some rules on this, and you can get a local appraiser to follow local state rules for marking the title? A mark on the title typically will typically get you a higher payout, because a clean title is worth more than a car with a documented marked past.

Before the flood it was clean.

Just a thought.
 

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Go with a total lost. No point in fixing something that might give you more problems in the long run. Maybe you will get more money that way and get yourself a newer Cruze. That's what I did.

When I wrecked my Cruze, I was given the option whether I wanted do a total loss on the car I took it.

Your insurance is trying to low ball you after this is settled get a new insurance company.
 
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