Chevrolet Cruze Forums banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
487 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
A few weeks back I made a post about those Spyder brand fog lights which seem to be the best option or the most popular thing besides the expensive oem ones. I don't expect anyone who has them to actually reply to this seeing that they didn't assist in addressing my last concerns (even the CarID vendor who promotes them on here) but what I will ask is this..... Since the lens are melting from just a few minutes of use do to hear from the built, are there any LED alternative options in regards to bulbs for fog lights? Since LED run cool I know this will eliminate the problem but what are the best LED bulb options? Can someone list links and part numbers? I so regret ever buying these Spyder fogs, they are trash!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,528 Posts
Trouble with a LED bulb is your fogs will project very little light....this because the reflectors are not configured for the light emitting diode placement.......However, if you have the lamps only because they look kinda nifty and you like the look when the lamps are on....meaning actual projection is secondary, then just remove a bulb and look for the industry number printed on it.

Better have good eyes....often borderline microscopic.
From there, go to someone like our forum supporter for LED's and do a crossover to get the correct part number...go from there.

I went through a similar situation with my 89 Supercoupe.....old internet info indicated the fog switch would melt over time since Ford, in its infinate wisdom, chose not to use a relay and ran full feed current to and from the switch.
I converted to LED yellow bulbs (fogs....yellow...you know) and now the switch doesn't even know they are on.

Thay really don't cast any usable light.....but look coolish....IMO.

Back to your car......if you want road lamps that actually light the road I'd be looking hard at CARID to allow a return.....melting is certainly a 'Not Fit for Use' situation and a return is in order.

Then I'd be recommending the factory kit......I have them....they work well.

Rob
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,528 Posts
I think you have confused LED's with HID's........LED's....cold.....HID's....hot hot hot....require a transformer with a heat sink.

Rob
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,528 Posts
A light emitting diode has no filiment and when operating, draw is almost immeasurable......gotta have draw to make heat, so.....I'm open to education.

Details please.

Rob
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,528 Posts
I get it......

I did more research and found that a high powered LED specifically for headlamp use, requires a heat sink....this because of the large number of diodes involved.

What got me off the path is we are discussing the small bulb design used in the various other bulb positions....in this case, the fog lamp housing.

So, now I know that the big ones require temperature control due to the electrical activity at the base prior to the led itself.

The normal leds for lighting a housing, not projecting light, do not require any temperature control.

So, I guess I'm a bit more edumacated.

Rob
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,804 Posts
Nit-pick. LEDs do create heat. They're not 100% efficient. But it's rarely a problem unless you want a lot of light. But when you have serious lighting desires, you have a significant amount of heat that has to be gotten rid of before it destroys the diodes. (Which is much more heat sensitive than wire and glass.) This is over and above any heat created by any LED controllers.

But even so, it's no where near the level of heat you get from heating a chunk of wire up until it glows white hot. That's why LEDs take so little power - they waste only a little as heat.

Bottom line, if the fixture in question can't handle the heat of an LED, then I question if it can work with any bulb technology.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
LEDs typically convert about 35% of the input electrical energy to light; the remaining 65% is wasted as heat. That's efficient when compared to incandescent bulbs (which waste around 95% of the input energy as heat).

But on their own, I certainly wouldn't classify LEDs as "efficient."


- Joe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
271 Posts
LED's are a semi conductor, which by definition means resistance and resistance to current flow=heat, LED's of any brightness do need heat sinking or will quickly burn up, compared to filament or gas discharge they put out a lot more lumens for power in but the light is very directional so various diffuser schemes are used and LED's need to be run off a regulated constant current power supply since the perimeters drift as they heat
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top