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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello

my 1.4t has just reached 157.000 miles.. I plan to go on ong road trip... going over the car I came across the fuel pump..I know these motors and their brushes an wear or... pump is not cheap and dropping the tank is a pain...
On my car there is no fuel pump module so the pump runs full rpm all the time

What´s your experience ? How long does a fuel pump last ? Does it make sense to replace it as preventative mainteance ?

How long does your cruze pump last so far ?
g
Thanks for sharing
 

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On my car there is no fuel pump module so the pump runs full rpm all the time
Eh? I thought all of them had a fuel pump module in the trunk area.
 

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We have not yet seen one fail on the forums. Nor have we seen the modules (in the left side of the trunk behind the carpet) fail. Several Cruzes have 500K+ on them without issue.

I've had one fuel pump fail at 200K; I've had 2 cars near 300K with the original fuel pump still. I have had 2 fuel pump relays go bad in those 2 cars though.

I think you should focus on other areas of the car for the upcoming trip. Coil packs, for instance, are a relatively common failure on these with a few years on them.
 

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My take:
It happens.
It's a PITA when it happens.
It's a bigger PITA when it happens in the middle of a trip.
There's no point in trying to guess when it will happen.

I figure anything over 200k miles is a good life for a fuel pump.
I wasn't too dismayed when my 1998 Taurus had a pump fail at 192k, it had been working fine then I parked the car for over a year and it wouldn't start so I figure I caused that 'early' failure.
 

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2014 Cruze Diesel, 2007 Cobalt, 1981 Camaro Z28, 2017 Volt
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I think most modern fuel pump/tank setups have solved issues where repeated low fuel situations cause the fuel pumps (which are cooled by the fuel) chew themselves up. It's rare to see a failure much anymore.

The 3rd and 4th gen F-Bodies were notorious for dead pumps if you consistently ran near or below 1/4 tank. The fuel level would not be enough to cool the pump, and constantly doing that would eventually murder them. My '86 IROC had a bad pump - when I changed the fuel filter, the gas that came out was silver. The pressure it made, at prime, was 3psi - well short of the 46psi spec - and it dropped instantly when you turned the car off.

It would take, sometimes, about 30 seconds of constant cranking, to get the car to eventually sputter to life, but it ran just fine after you did.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Thanks for your Replys and sharing your experiences... the european Vauxhall version of the Cruze ( drivetrain is exactely the same) do not all come with regulated fuel pumps.. my 1.4t has a standard fuel pump, a pressure regulator at the end of the fuel rail and a return line... I think there are Eco models with Start / Stop system that have different fuel systems.

As far as cooling goes, modern fuel pumps are directly cooled by the fuel flowing through them.. the fuel flows through ( true!!) the electric motor, to cool it, to lubricate it and to flush away wear particles of the brushes.
So I´m not really concerned about cooling and I think today cooling does not depend too much on fuel level anymore..
of course fuel temperature in the tank will rise quicker when the tank is empty but not to a critical level..because you run out of fuel
sooner or later :) And on system with a return line, fuel flow through the pump is high all the time

I´m just concerned about normal wear of the brushes and commutator which are classic wear items.

I recently changed my alternator regulator and there was only about 1/3 of the brushes left.. and since then I
think about what they look like inside the fuel pump.
But maybe I should not be too concenred if there are pumps that went 500K

BTW I will carry several spare parts with me, including an igniton module, a set of plugs and a coolant temp sensor (already failed 2 times) :)
No failure on this car so far but very bad experience with ignition coils on my last car.
 

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To my knowledge, no Gen-1 Cruze has stop/start.
 

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Thanks for your Replys and sharing your experiences... the european Vauxhall version of the Cruze ( drivetrain is exactely the same) do not all come with regulated fuel pumps.. my 1.4t has a standard fuel pump, a pressure regulator at the end of the fuel rail and a return line... I think there are Eco models with Start / Stop system that have different fuel systems.

As far as cooling goes, modern fuel pumps are directly cooled by the fuel flowing through them.. the fuel flows through ( true!!) the electric motor, to cool it, to lubricate it and to flush away wear particles of the brushes.
So I´m not really concerned about cooling and I think today cooling does not depend too much on fuel level anymore..
of course fuel temperature in the tank will rise quicker when the tank is empty but not to a critical level..because you run out of fuel
sooner or later :) And on system with a return line, fuel flow through the pump is high all the time

I´m just concerned about normal wear of the brushes and commutator which are classic wear items.

I recently changed my alternator regulator and there was only about 1/3 of the brushes left.. and since then I
think about what they look like inside the fuel pump.
But maybe I should not be too concenred if there are pumps that went 500K

BTW I will carry several spare parts with me, including an igniton module, a set of plugs and a coolant temp sensor (already failed 2 times) :)
No failure on this car so far but very bad experience with ignition coils on my last car.
Original Poster are you in Europe? Are you talking about the Vauxhall version that is similar to the body style of the American Cruze? In that case I don't think we can really compare. Guys it sounds like he has a more conventional fuel system, complete with a standard excess fuel line running back to the tank. These car's don't have to meet USA EPA emissions standards so they maybe running standard fuel return systems from the fuel rail, vs. variable speed fuel pumps with no return lines..
 
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