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FI Lunatic
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Discussion Starter #1
I’m about to install a couple gauges on the pillar of my 2012 LTZ/RS. Where is the best point to connect the gauge backlighting circuit to?
 

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Super Moderator
2014 LT program car, Pull Me Over Red
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I may have posted that in this thread:


but if not, all the links to what I referred to are at the beginning. It depends on whether or not you want to dim them.

To dim: Pop the headlight switch out - pull the drivers seat fuse box cover off and reach up and push out - and take a meter and meter the pin-outs and find the one that changes voltage when the dimming wheel output is changed. Follow that wire to a spot you want to tap into.

That is from: Is it possible to dim a boost gauge?
 

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Premium Member
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1,152 Posts
I may have posted that in this thread:


but if not, all the links to what I referred to are at the beginning. It depends on whether or not you want to dim them.

To dim: Pop the headlight switch out - pull the drivers seat fuse box cover off and reach up and push out - and take a meter and meter the pin-outs and find the one that changes voltage when the dimming wheel output is changed. Follow that wire to a spot you want to tap into.

That is from: Is it possible to dim a boost gauge?
Variable voltage systems are rarely used. It's all PWM, including the cluster lights.
 

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Super Moderator
2014 LT program car, Pull Me Over Red
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8,492 Posts
EASY AND EFFECTIVE WAY TO MEASURE PWM… WITHOUT A SCOPE!



Sometimes when a project is coming together, you need to cobble a tool together to get it completed. Whether it’s something very involved, like building a 3D printer to fabricate custom parts, or something relatively simple, like wiring a lightbulb and a battery together to create a simple continuity checker, we’ve all had to come up with something on the fly. Despite having access to an oscilloscope, [Brian] aka [schoolie] has come up with his own method for measuring PWM period and duty cycle without a scope, just in case there’s ever a PWM emergency!
The system he has come up with is so simple it’s borderline genius. The PWM signal in question is fed through a piezo speaker in parallel with a resistor. The output from the speaker is then sent to an FFT (fast fourier transform) app for Android devices, which produces a picture of a waveform. [schoolie] then opens the picture in MS Paint and uses the coordinates of the cursor and a little arithmetic to compute the period and the duty cycle.
For not using a scope, this method is pretty accurate, and only uses two discrete circuit components (the resistor and the speaker). If you’re ever in a pinch with PWM, this is sure to help, and be a whole lot cheaper than finding an oscilloscope!

Use the time-domain view of SimpleFFT”.

Or you could try this:
Oscilliscope Built From Parts Just Laying Around
 
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