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At that point I’ll just straight pipe it from the turbo and be done with it.
If you remove every piece of exhaust treatment equipment (oxidation catalyst, DPF, and SCR catalyst) you will get all kinds of CELs as well as a 75 mile countdown for a defective emissions system that will cap your speed at 65mph, 55mph, 45mph, and then 4mph.

How do you plain to "straight pipe" a modern engine with all the emissions equipment?
 

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pickups do it all the time. if there is a kit, and i've heard there currently isn't right now, you'll need to mod the computer to thinking everything is still there. unfortunately it is illegal to do in the eyes of the EPA, but they're just money hungry turds that can suck an egg in my opinion. gen1 cruze had a fair delete kit that at least got rid of the exhaust components. i couldn't say for the EGR or anthing like that though.
Pickups do it if there is a computer tune that will allow it.

You might not have noticed but the EPA has really started to crack down in tuners. In years past they just tolerated tuners who sold "off-road only" delete kits that were done to pickups that spent about 99.99% of their time on public roadways. It was a wink and a nod, and the EPA just figured it was a relative drop in the bucket of pickups sold so it wouldn't matter all that much.

Fast forward and we have discovered diesel emissions are a real serious problem, and they no longer tolerate tuning that deletes emissions equipment. They've sued several tuners and won consent agreements in court to the point that tuning is on a downward spiral. You'll see tuning that can increase power but it still leaves emissions equipment in place. No one really makes tuning to where you can delete, take off, block off, or otherwise eliminate emissions equipment. It's high cost, low margin, and the EPA will sue you for it now.
 

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EPA has suspended all enforcement INDEFINITELY
That's suspension of the big ticket enforcements of the clean air and clean water acts, I.E., the field personnel who are on-site enforcers at power plants, water treatment plants, etc. The suspension is to give critical operations a little bit of leeway in the coronavirus emergency. Example: a coal power plant doesn't get a delivery of some material used to wash flue gases of NOx or whatever. Well, you have to keep lights on for people, so it's overlooked for the time being. So on and so forth.

This doesn't mean engine tuners can do whatever they want now. Go ahead, but the EPA will be back to focus on them later when things begin getting closer to normal.
 
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