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Discussion Starter #1
So i took my wife's Cruze in to figure out why the AC isn't working and this is what we found:

1: We vacuumed out the system then charged it back up again. Couldn't see or hear any leaks of any sort even though the system only had about .3 psi in the system when i brought it in.
2: When we tried to turn the AC on we found out that the car was throwing a P0533 Air Conditioning (A/C) Refrigerant Pressure Sensor Circuit High Voltage ,Air Conditioning code. So the compressor wouldn't kick on at all unless you manually turned it on (but will only override for 5 seconds so we couldn't actually run the system). So we drained and vacuumed the system (didn't wanna leave it full while it wasn't working).

Has anyone else ran into this issue? I was told to get a cost on a new AC high pressure sensor switch and then to go from there since it may still have a leak somewhere else that we cant see until the system is actually up and running.

Price on new sensor is $75+tax. Then labor and coolant will probably bring the bill around $300 or so and we may still find a leak after its actually up and running. Not sure whether to continue on with this gamble or say heck with it.

Thoughts?

2012 1.8L with 123,000km.
 

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Administrator, Resident Tater Salad
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Inspect the condenser for leaks. The most common cause of leaks on Cruzes is a rock to the condenser at the front of the car.

If the condenser looks ok, I would replace the sensor throwing the code, refill the system by weight, check pressures on both sides, and add a flourescent dye to the system.

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Discussion Starter #3
Inspect the condenser for leaks. The most common cause of leaks on Cruzes is a rock to the condenser at the front of the car.

If the condenser looks ok, I would replace the sensor throwing the code, refill the system by weight, check pressures on both sides, and add a flourescent dye to the system.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
We didn't see or hear anything when we filled the system up. It was pretty quiet in that enclosed shop plus we sprayed some soapy water on the condenser and seen nothing.

Is it possible the leak sealed itself overtime? Or does the system have to actually run in order for the leak to show?
 

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Administrator, Resident Tater Salad
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We didn't see or hear anything when we filled the system up. It was pretty quiet in that enclosed shop plus we sprayed some soapy water on the condenser and seen nothing.

Is it possible the leak sealed itself overtime? Or does the system have to actually run in order for the leak to show?
Most leaks are very slow. Doubt you'd see anything immediately.
 

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You're not going to hear a leak unless it's a big hole.

Looking for a leak these days is as easy as looking for a coolant leak. You're looking for green oil leak.

PAG oil contains a green dye and is used in every component of the system. 134 contains pag oil. Therefore it also contains the green dye.

I've noticed some of the newer cars have CONTAINS DYE on the ac labels under the hood now.

Pop your charge port caps off. And look for green dye in the shrader valves. They're the most common for leaking. If you see green. There's a leak. And you don't need to replace the entire hose. Those shrader valves are available as a part by themselves. EYE exam every component and fitting in the system. Run your fingers underneath. And lift the car up to inspect underneath. And as stated above, Look really hard at the condensor as it's out in the open in the wind.

If you can't find anything. The next step is a leak detector. It detects freon leaks. Harborfreight has the cheapest and the reviews look good for finding leaks. I just bought one myself.

NOW, you can't see the evaporator. But here's how you test it. With a leak detector. Turn key on. Fan on hi. Put the wand in the vents. If the evaporator leaks, the fan will blow the freon in to the cab and the leak detector will pick it up.

It's also part of the new procedure for charging cars up these days. As outlined by the most recent clean air act. Testing the evaporator for leaks.

NOW, keep in mind. You need freon in the system to look for leaks. You're not likely to find anything on an empty system.

YOU'RE LOOKING FOR GREEN OIL LEAKS.

P.S. If you find that you need to change the high pressure switch. YOU DON'T NEED TO DRAIN THE FREON. Iit's threaded on to a valve. Inside that valve is the same type of shrader valve that's located inside your charging ports. Take the part off. You're freon will stay inside the system. As long as the valve itself doesn't leak.

If you find yourself doing the leak detector check. You don't wander around the components waiting for soundoff. Hold the wand at one point and wait a couple of seconds before moving along to the next inspetion point. That's how long it takes for the detector to sound off should it sniff a leak. Read the instruction manual so you have a better understanding.

ALSO, something to consider. As we weren't there to watch what you were doing. As per your code. You might have overfilled it and that's why the compressor wouldn't kick on. Your high pressure might have been too high. Much in the same manner that teh compressor won't run if the low pressure is too low.

As also mentioned. The exact amount needs to be put in. That means using a digital scale. Preferably one that reads backwards. Your life will be so much easier starting off at ZERO and counting backwards. Rather then counting backwards from current weight.
 
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