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I've been using 89 in my 13 now that the weather is cool and 91-93 in the summer.
I've noticed about 5 more mpg with 93.
 

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Car is globally calibrated for 96 octane which is used in Europe... We get heavily retarded spark in summer and on low octane.. hence reduction in MPG
96 Octane in Europe is not the same as 96 Octane in the U.S. & Canada? In the U.K. the octane rating starts at 95?

MON is typically 8-10 points lower than the RON.
In the US/Canada and some other parts of the Americas, they use the average of the two. Hence lower.
In most other places, they just use the RON.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Octane_rating#Measurement_metho...



 

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I confirm that I switched back to Regular 87 yesterday at Kroger and paid $1.25 a Gallon with my discount. They are doing 4X Gift Card Gas points. Perfect Holiday Gift!
 

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My Aunt and Uncle use the cheap stuff. 85 octane. Roughly 40k miles on both there 10 dodge truck and 14 chev traverse. No difference in power or mileage according to them so they don't use the expensive stuff.

They had no idea that the compression ratio in the truck is 10.5 and the traverse is 11.5. According to google.

The 1.4 cruze motor is 9.5.
 

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The only time I run 93 octane is when I'm driving through the mountains to see my friends is Washington Dc. Othewise, 89 serves me well in Wisconsin in the summer and 87 in the winter or when it is colder than 40 F. I have a 2014 though...something to keep in mind since they seem to handle lower octane better than earlier models.
I'm going to consistently start running mid grade. If my numbers keep coming up around 50 mpg it will be worth it but ¢27 is a big jump. Basically a 9? price jump. Premium is ridiculously higher. 31% price increase vs 87. Doesn't make much sense if the car runs right. Even at 87 octane. Slightly retarded though lol. I can consistently get 45 mpg with 87 so no way I can recoup 31% in milage. 9% is possible 49.5 mpg no problem I believe my best tank just over 51 mpg was mid grade. Premium go recoup cost jump would be just shy of 59 mpg. Cost effective is what I'm going for. If your driving a Cruze you didn't intend to go for HP in the first place so no point in ponying up an extra ¢72 per gallon for a minimal performance boost. ATM 87 2.27 89 2.54 91 2.99 93 3.07. ¢80 more for 93 octane!!!
 

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The only time I run 93 octane is when I'm driving through the mountains to see my friends is Washington Dc. Othewise, 89 serves me well in Wisconsin in the summer and 87 in the winter or when it is colder than 40 F. I have a 2014 though...something to keep in mind since they seem to handle lower octane better than earlier models.
You guys don't have mountains on the east side. They're called hills. Your tallest peak is 2500 feet. My home city is 2000 feet higher. Our tallest peaks are around 14,000 feet.
 

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You guys don't have mountains on the east side. They're called hills. Your tallest peak is 2500 feet. My home city is 2000 feet higher. Our tallest peaks are around 14,000 feet.
Not to mention that the higher you go in elevation, you can get away with a lower octane fuel ... so it wouldn't make the most sense to use the most expensive fuel to drive through the "mountains" you have there
 

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Not to mention that the higher you go in elevation, you can get away with a lower octane fuel ... so it wouldn't make the most sense to use the most expensive fuel to drive through the "mountains" you have there
That's my thinking. Atmospheric pressure around these parts is 12.2 compared to 14.7 at sea level
 

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You guys don't have mountains on the east side. They're called hills. Your tallest peak is 2500 feet. My home city is 2000 feet higher. Our tallest peaks are around 14,000 feet.
A guy has to be careful how he writes here:>) My understanding is that a mountain is any "hill" that is over 2000 feet. I remember a story about a place in England where the hill was 1980 some feet high. So they piled a bunch of rocks at the top so that it could be called a mountain. I kid you not.

All that aside, I still say I notice a big difference when I climbed those "hills" in the Appalachians. I know from the hills in Wisconsin, that the car chugs and bucks when I'm using 87 octane. With their higher octane when my engine was straining, she climbed those "hills" no problem.
 

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A guy has to be careful how he writes here:>) My understanding is that a mountain is any "hill" that is over 2000 feet. I remember a story about a place in England where the hill was 1980 some feet high. So they piled a bunch of rocks at the top so that it could be called a mountain. I kid you not.

All that aside, I still say I notice a big difference when I climbed those "hills" in the Appalachians. I know from the hills in Wisconsin, that the car chugs and bucks when I'm using 87 octane. With their higher octane when my engine was straining, she climbed those "hills" no problem.
You guys have higher atmospheric pressure then us on the western side also. And a LOT of moisture to go with that thicker air. :)

When it comes to performance. It would be the only reason I'd want to live in California.
 

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While the Summer Blend have the additives to maintain the fuel economy, the Winter Blend gasoline has a higher Octane rating than what is indicated on the sticker. Regular fuel (87) in the summer comes in at or just below 87 Octane even despite the extra additives; whereas, the same exact fuel in the Winter has a higher Octane closer to Premium Gasoline (91-93 Octane) due to the higher amount of butane.

https://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.php?id=11031
"A
typical summer-grade gasoline is composed of fluid catalytic cracker gasoline, 40%; straight-run gasoline (directly from crude oil distillation), 25%; alkylate, 15%; reformate, 18%; and butane, 2%. Winter-grade gasoline usually contains more butane, which has an octane rating slightly below premium gasoline (91-93 octane). While butane is an economic component of gasoline, the high volatility of butane limits the amount of butane that can be used in summer-grade gasoline."

In the end, the benefits of fuel savings and extra octane in Winter balances out with the purchase of Mid-Grade to Premium fuel in the Summer.
 

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While the Summer Blend have the additives to maintain the fuel economy, the Winter Blend gasoline has a higher Octane rating than what is indicated on the sticker. Regular fuel (87) in the summer comes in at or just below 87 Octane even despite the extra additives; whereas, the same exact fuel in the Winter has a higher Octane closer to Premium Gasoline (91-93 Octane) due to the higher amount of butane.

https://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.php?id=11031
"A
typical summer-grade gasoline is composed of fluid catalytic cracker gasoline, 40%; straight-run gasoline (directly from crude oil distillation), 25%; alkylate, 15%; reformate, 18%; and butane, 2%. Winter-grade gasoline usually contains more butane, which has an octane rating slightly below premium gasoline (91-93 octane). While butane is an economic component of gasoline, the high volatility of butane limits the amount of butane that can be used in summer-grade gasoline."

In the end, the benefits of fuel savings and extra octane in Winter balances out with the purchase of Mid-Grade to Premium fuel in the Summer.
This is the first time I've come across this.
 

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I had to come back to this tread and share something. It has been hot and humid the past three weeks here in wisconsin. 89 octane E10 just wasn't doing it, so I ran 91 octane E0. I still had some hesitation when I accelerated merging into highway traffic! Also when climbing a large hill. However I recorded some of my best fuel mileage.
I finally switched to 93 octane E10. What a difference. Plenty of power, no hesitation. This is what I need to run in real hot weather. Perhaps I won't get the gas mileage of 91 octane E0, but that isn't my main concern.

87 octane E10 in the winter. From 40-75 degrees, 89 octane E10, and in anything 80 or above, it is going to be 93 octane E10. My car is an 2014 eco with a manual.
 

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It's been relatively hot in MA but I'm still using what is recommeded in the manual.
Quality 87 Octane.

Only time I've had issue is when I've been forced to buy cheap gas.

It's a 2013 with the 1.4 and a manual.

Still getting the same 36mpg combined I've always gotten.

Generally don't use the AC below 50mph. Read somewhere ages ago thats the point where the drag is more of a hit then the compressor. Probably helps how pleasant I find summer in New England.
 

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i saw absolutley no change in MPGs with higher octanes. car does idle and accelerate much better on the higher octanes but no increase in MPGs.
 

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i saw absolutley no change in MPGs with higher octanes. car does idle and accelerate much better on the higher octanes but no increase in MPGs.
At steady speed driving or moderate accelerations this is a true statement. Where the higher octane comes in handy is hard accelerations, speeds above 75 MPH, and long steep hills. This is why I have been recommending for the past 7 years that each driver try a couple of tanks of each octane and decide for his/her-self which octane is best suited for their driving style and environment.
 

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Sort of...

If an engine has a low compression ratio and a set high-point for ignition advance that's in the 87 octane range, and almost never retards timing, then there's really nothing to gain from higher octane... The Trailblazer, for instance, gains absolutely nothing from anything over 87... It's because the compression ratio isn't really high, and the maximum advance on the timing is well within the 87 octane range...

The engine controls the fuel to go with the temperature/density of the air... It puts in less fuel when it needs less fuel...

Mike
I have a 2003 trailblazer I have run 93 a few times and didn't notice anything different
 
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