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Lawyers for General Motors asked a Texas judge to dismiss one of the remaining lawsuits involving the deadly ignition-switch defect that led to a costly 2014 recall of 2.6 million small cars.
In a brief filed in a state court in Harris County, Texas, GM asked that the suit filed by Zachary, Lisa and Mark Stevens be dismissed and the court sanction the Stevens family for fabricating evidence. Zach Stevens, the son of Lisa and Mark, was driving the family's 2007 Saturn Sky in November 2007 when, while driving at a high rate of speed, the car bounced off a guardrail, crossed the center line and crashed into a 1997 Nissan Frontier, killing the driver, Mariano Landaverde. GM acknowledged in its multiple recalls of vehicles, including the 2007 Sky, that the problem could be caused by the weight of extra keys or other objects attached to the vehicle's key chain.
But GM lawyers says the multiple-key keychain the Stevens' lawyer tried to introduce as evidence was not used by Zach Stevens when his car crashed into Landaverde's truck.
"Plaintiffs' scheme might have gone undetected except for one fatal mistake they made: putting the wrong key on the keychain that they recently assembled and miraculously 'found' shortly before trial," the motion states.
It then describes that when a judge and lawyers for both sides inspected the Saturn Sky's remains on Sunday they discovered that the key on the keychain was from a different vehicle.

GM seeks dismissal of Texas ignition-switch lawsuit
 

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That article has a couple of other interesting tidbits near the end. In one case the jury found that weather was the primary cause of the crash. In the other GM's lawyers traced the paperwork on a failed home purchase and showed the plaintiff was a serial fraudster.
 

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Part of my issue with this recall and these lawsuits (besides the fact the majority of stories involved someone drunk, not wearing their seatbelt driving off the road at a high rate of speed) is that they all seem to try and imply the key caused the crash. What is generally accepted is that the key will turn the ignition off when exposed to a large jolt - say, hitting another car. It doesn't cause the accident, it is a result of one. The steering and brakes still work.

And on this one: he was driving at a high rate of speed - why should this even be considered?
 
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Was there any complaints from the 2.4 million users about an ignition switch that was very loose in the run position?

Would sure hear it from this guy, and if my dealer tells me dey all to dis, go up the ladder like I has to do before with other problems. Just because dey all do dis doesn't make it right.

Most of the problems I had with kids was not being able to remove the ignition key at all, would hit a curb with that pot metal steering wheel lock, or when they were using cables to make sure you were in park, if misadjusted, couldn't remove that key at all.

Did have problems with my 88 Supra when I first got it, had keys for three vehicles and a house key inside of a dual leather pouch with a snap on it. In this car, sat so low, my knee would hit that leather pouch and knock it out of run. So I put all those keys on a ring that solved this problem, but maybe I should have sued Toyota instead.

But not a problem today, no way can you put 3 or 4 remotes on a single ring, so each vehicle has its own separate set of keys. Ha, only problem is walking out the door with the wrong set of keys in your pocket, but doesn't take that long to figure out, wrong ones don't work.
 
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