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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've owned my 2012 Cruze since new (Built September 2011), and it's never been back into the shop. This was my decision to try to keep it the way Lordstown built it. I haven't had any of the recalls done.

I have no specific brake concerns other than a slightly firmer pedal since it's been new. When testing the air pump by depressurizing the booster, and turning the key to the on position I don't have a vacuum pump running.

I've used Chiltons Online (The only access I have) to pull the recall 12213 which is replace switch PN13460776. Seems easy and I can get the parts under $15 on amazon.

Doing some googling shows 12213 may have been revised to 12213A which is now replacement of the entire hose assembly 13457666.

Can someone who's familiar with this provide some background on this change? Is that switch that hard to remove from the vacuum housing that things break? Or was the change due to parts availability? It does appear that the procedure for the switch removal clearly states check the position of the valve inside the housing with a light before installation of a new switch. Guessing there may have been some breakage??

I'm thinking of checking voltage on the relay just to make sure it's not a bad pump. I tested this about a year ago and the pump was running so I didn't worry about it. If I wasn't a "Cruzetalk junky" I would have never realized there could be an issue with the brakes. I traditionally get 37 mpg with the 1.4L AT and drive with no A/C.. You only possibly notice something when the engine is in high boost and the vacuum reservoir is empty.

Thanks for your field experience..
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Just in case someone finds this thread with a similar problem. The initial repairs were done with the switch replacement, repairs as of 2015 forward are done by replacing the entire line.

I found a switch on e-bay NOS from a dealer for $15 and installed this myself. Take your time and it's very doable. When removing the old switch pull from each of the contacts and go back and forth between them. The switch will pop free.

Installing the new switch. Even with the lubricant they give you, it seemed like a lot of chore to get the switch to seat. Go between the contacts with a screwdriver, upper right corner with a screwdriver, and finally left side of the switch on the white plastic part of the switch with a screwdriver.

Alternate pushing at these locations. I also put a little bit of lube on a screwdriver tip, and wetted the plastic housing that the switch goes into. The first time it wouldn't go in. I removed the new switch lubed the housing, and applied pressure at the three points above alternating between them and the switch appears to have taken just fine.

The procedure includes a labor time for installation of a second switch so it's very possible that techs were breaking the first switch pushing too hard, and possibly breaking the housing resulting in bad vacuum lines causing pumps to fail.

The bad vacuum lines and pumps are my guesses, but we did have one forum member have a line take out a pump. He's the one that wrote the how To on pump replacement.

If you can get a switch under $15 try it, but I now understand why they went to full line replacement. The second version of the recall procedure clearly states that if the car was successfully fixed with the switch replacement, there is no need to replace the entire hose assembly.

I'm guessing it's so late after this recall that the run of switches are gone, except for limited quantities in the e-bay world. They were manufactured in Germany according to the box.

The entire line appears that it could be removed from the top of the car. I believe the hose disconnects from the vacuum pump by lifting up on the white clip on the connector at the pump. I didn't try this, but it should be possible.
 
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