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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, so I recently ordered the putco headlight harness upgrade, and I'm just waiting for it to arrive, but in the mean time I wanna know exactly what I'll be needing to successfully install the harness, I've seen a video that shows an install but doesn't use any capacitors or resistors, so idk if I need them or not, but I could use the help with it, thanks


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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Oh man, you're a life saver, I really appreciate the response , I'll be putting together the harness today as soon as it arrives
 

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^ He is right. also on page 3 i believe it was stated that a in line fuse is not needed as well. apparently the ends have a built in voltage protector.
 

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^ He is right. also on page 3 i believe it was stated that a in line fuse is not needed as well. apparently the ends have a built in voltage protector.
A fuse is cheap protection and much easier to replace than a burnt harness or whatever a "voltage protector" is. Properly fusing any and all wiring connections within 18-inches of the battery is recommended for ALL aftermarket wiring you add to you car no matter what the accessory is. It would be a shame to have the wire short for whatever reason without a fuse and burn the car to the ground rather than simply blow a fuse!!!

It is irresponsible to recommend someone not use a fuse whether there is a built in "voltage protector" or not. Especially as a "voltage protector" would simply protect a device downstream from too high or too low voltage not have anything to do with current protection at a constant voltage as would be the case with a shorted wire.

Sorry to be so blunt. But as an electrical engineer and former mobile electronics installer it really bothers me when I hear something like this that could severely compromise someone's car for no reason.
 
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hey im all for fuses but if its not needed its not needed. i didn't make the harness with the built in protection but i plan on using in line fuses. i have 3 watertight ones from my motorcycle repairs so im getting my moneys worth. you can add them as a extra precaution but its not required. many members are running without them and they are fine.

its not irresponsible if the harness has a fail safe already
 

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A fuse is cheap protection and much easier to replace than a burnt harness or whatever a "voltage protector" is. Properly fusing any and all wiring connections within 18-inches of the battery is recommended for ALL aftermarket wiring you add to you car no matter what the accessory is. It would be a shame to have the wire short for whatever reason without a fuse and burn the car to the ground rather than simply blow a fuse!!!

It is irresponsible to recommend someone not use a fuse whether there is a built in "voltage protector" or not. Especially as a "voltage protector" would simply protect a device downstream from too high or too low voltage not have anything to do with current protection at a constant voltage as would be the case with a shorted wire.

Sorry to be so blunt. But as an electrical engineer and former mobile electronics installer it really bothers me when I hear something like this that could severely compromise someone's car for no reason.
The harness has built in fusible links, negating the need for separate inline fuses.
 

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Ha, that post dates back to 03-17-2012 that caused me concerned. With engine running to get 14.5 volts, check the voltage drop between both the positive and negative battery terminals to their respective terminals directly at the headlamp sockets.

Was only seeing about 0.2 volts maximum, wasn't worth fooling with, unless you got a harness made by some Chinese factory that was cheating.

Incandescent are strictly pure DC, capacitors won't do anything, nothing to filter. Could be a major problem with HID's with some steep current peaks.

If I was seeing a larger voltage drop, like a total of greater than 0.5 volts, GM would have heard from me. Head lamps are only 65 watts, at 14.5 volts only draw 4.5 amps. The one on the right hand side is worst case, has the longer run. Voltage drops can also be in the BCM or the fuse relay box, voltage originates from the battery terminals, so have to pinpoint where these drops are. Also have to check the voltage drops on the dims and the brights, two different circuits.
 

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hey im all for fuses but if its not needed its not needed. i didn't make the harness with the built in protection but i plan on using in line fuses. i have 3 watertight ones from my motorcycle repairs so im getting my moneys worth. you can add them as a extra precaution but its not required. many members are running without them and they are fine.

its not irresponsible if the harness has a fail safe already
The harness has built in fusible links, negating the need for separate inline fuses.
10-4 a fusible link is different than voltage protection, which will do nothing for a short. Personally I would still use fuses rather than a fusible link as replacing a fuse is much easier than replacing a fusible link.
 
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10-4 a fusible link is different than voltage protection, which will do nothing for a short. Personally I would still use fuses rather than a fusible link as replacing a fuse is much easier than replacing a fusible link.
I was debating adding fuses to my harness as well, but opted not to since the fusible links were there and it would have given me more work. If I have to, I'll cut out the fusable links and install the two inline fuses I initially planned on.

That being said, in the event that the fusible links do fry, one can simply disconnect the harness and plug the OE connectors back into the headlight bulbs. Should take all of two minutes, and one can worry about the harness at a later date.
 

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I was debating adding fuses to my harness as well, but opted not to since the fusible links were there and it would have given me more work. If I have to, I'll cut out the fusable links and install the two inline fuses I initially planned on.

That being said, in the event that the fusible links do fry, one can simply disconnect the harness and plug the OE connectors back into the headlight bulbs. Should take all of two minutes, and one can worry about the harness at a later date.
Good to know... many years ago when I was an installer on a regular basis you would not believe the stuff that cam in to us on a regular basis for repair or upgrades... Stuff like 4-gauge power wire with 16-gauge ground wire on large 1000-watt amps, power cables running unfused through the cowl and fender then through the door jamb and all kinds of other messes. I always charged more to repair someone elses poor work than to do the installation properly in the first place!!!

I'm too old and slow to do many more installs than my own or some friends/family these days but I do still enjoy high-end audio. In fact the upcoming issue of Ultimate Diesel Builder's Guide magazine will have a mobile electronics/audio/video systems theme with a buyer's guide and truck features that all have big sound systems installed in them as well as a truck upgrade with JL Audio gear in a Silverado 2500 HD and a review of the new Colorado Diesel. Pick up a copy of the April/May issue on sale starting 4.19.16.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thank you all for the input, I was finally able to install the harness, it wasn't too bad and I got to brush up on my soldering skills, haha, anyways, didn't have any triune with the lights turning on and off, I'll have to wait unlit to check for a difference, and I'm using xtreme vision bike btw
 

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View attachment 183697

For years, GM an other Domestics were using a super fast acting circuit breaker for head lamps, the Japanese started using fast blowing fuses, and for whatever reason, GM copied this. Each head lamp filament has its own fast blowing fuse, and once blown, have to be replaced. They are all in that under hood fuse/relay box along with the DRL point contacts.

GM was using a self cleaning sliding type switch for head lamps. One spec of carbon on these point contacts, won't get that lamp on. The fuses themselves add two more non-molecular touching type contacts, augmented by corrosion due to road salt.

Daytime running lights, complicated the heck out of these circuits, because people are too stupid to switch on their lights when conditions call for it, and if that BCM crashes, its a computer, can loose all of your headlamps. Some guys go nuts trying to troubleshoot these circuits.

But the bottom line, already have fuses, why even add more? Just more problems.
 
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