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I have a 2014 LT and typically will pay $65 at a drive through oil change, but I'm balling on a budget and need to save money. This would be a helpful skill to learn in the long run and I'm wondering what everyone thinks... worth it? Looks like I can get 5 quarts of oil for $30 at an automotive store.
Edit: While y'all are here, I have been experiencing rough idling and trouble starting the engine the first time after gassing up. Check engine light is on. Codes were P0171 I think and maybe P0403, but I'm not exactly sure. A couple months back it was accelerating poorly and I had to get my coil pack replaced. Some people say purge valve for this problem.
 

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A gallon of rotella T6 synthetic is 30$ at Walmart, filter maybe 5-8$. What’s a big perk of DIY is that you know it’s done right.
 
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Looks like I can get 5 quarts of oil for $30 at an automotive store.
For that price, I can get the oil and filter at Walmart. You can buy lunch with the savings after you're done :)

Tip: Use a 6-pt socket on the drain plug - you're less likely to round the shoulders.

Doug

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Walmart SuperTech High Mileage Full Synthetic Dexos1 is ~$14 for a 5qt jug.
Your choice of Fram, Mobil1, K&N, and ACDelco filters are all under $10.
Makes a quality oil change that's meets the newest GM specs for under $25.
 

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A gallon of rotella T6 synthetic is 30$ at Walmart, filter maybe 5-8$. What’s a big perk of DIY is that you know it’s done right.
I wouldn't exactly call running Rotella T6 in a 1.4L Turbo, "done right." There are a LOT of reasons not to run that oil in these engines.
 

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It doens't meet the Dexos1 specifications required for this vehicle, and it falls short on performance metrics. There many technical reasons to avoid it. I'll copy an article I wrote a while back here so you can review:


A word to those running Rotella T6 and other HDEOs in gasoline engines because some loudmouth on BITOG or some forum told you to. Don't. I used to tell this to people all the time; that HDEOs don't belong in gasoline engines, but I've learned a lot more lately as to specifically why that is the case.
Reason 1: Primary ZDDP. What most people just call Zinc, ZDDP is an additive package in oil that is known for anti-wear properties. I'll spare you the science behind ZDDP decomposition tiers and the nature of boundary lubrication, but what you have to realize is that there are 200+ formulations of ZDDP and they are not all equal. They come in two main categories: primary and secondary. Primary ZDDP is used mostly as an antioxidant to fight oxidative thickening in engine oils in high-heat applications, of which there are plenty in diesel engines, and is also geared more for lower friction coefficient. By contrast, gasoline engines either use mostly secondary ZDDP with some primary, or exclusively secondary (which is the case of higher quality oils), and is geared more for tribofilm formulation. Basically, your 1200ppm of Zinc in Rotella T6 is not actually protecting better than 800ppm of Zinc API SN spec synthetic oil and certainly not better than a high secondary ZDDP formulated gasoline engine oil.
Reason 2: Anti-foaming. Also referred to as air release, the oil has to release air pockets generated during friction and movement. Rotella is not very good at this, and that's OK when you are running a Detroit Diesel with a 2100RPM redline or even a 6.7 Powestroke with a 3400RPM redline (where the anti-foaming starts to become a bigger issue), not so much when you're running a Subaru FA20 with a 7400RPM redline. Under extended use, this can eventually aerate the fluid enough to cause catastrophic failure, or at minimum power loss.
Reason 3: Detergents/Dispersants. Diesel engines typically deal more with soot handling and dispersion, so the additive package is designed accordingly. On the other hand, gasoline engine detergent packs are designed more to handle acidity. This discrepancy can also result in reduced performance in gasoline engines as the detergent tries to clean the cylinder walls, which compromises the seal between rings and cylinder walls and reduces compression and efficiency.
Reason 4: The other day someone challenged me to post oil analysis reports of Rotella T6 shearing (thinning) in viscosity. I did a google image search for Rotella T6 (virgin viscosity of 14.9 cSt) and struggled to find a single oil analysis that was actually in-spect! In fact, I'd say 9/10 oil analysis reports showed that it had sheared in viscosity. If you're looking for a high quality base oil with additives that don't shear in viscosity, this isn't your best option.
Now I'm sure I'll get the classic "I've been using this oil and nothing has blown up yet" rhetoric by people who are too cheap to consider better options like AMSOIL, Driven Racing, Motul, and Schaeffer, but that doesn't mean that the product doesn't have its deficiencies simply because you want it to work. I realize people have a higher tendency to believe information that they agree with regarding a cheaper product than a more expensive one, but unless you already knew everything I presented in this post, you ought to reconsider your lubricant choice in gasoline engines (especially high-revving and turbo gasoline engines). There are far better options on the market that will protect better and make more power.
Feel free to share wherever appropriate.
Resources:
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11249-016-0706-7
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1023/B:TRIL.0000044495.26882.b5
https://www.stle.org/images/pdf/STLE_ORG/BOK/LS/Additives/The%20Chemistry%20and%20Function%20of%20Lubricant%20Additives.pdf
https://www.machinerylubrication.com/Read/31107/oil-lubricant-additives
https://www.machinerylubrication.com/Read/28576/comparing-gasoline-diesel-engine-oils-
https://www.stle.org/images/pdf/STLE_ORG/Newsletter/2019/TL/FilmThicknessAndFrictionOfZDDP.pdf
 

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I have a 2014 LT and typically will pay $65 at a drive through oil change, but I'm balling on a budget and need to save money. This would be a helpful skill to learn in the long run and I'm wondering what everyone thinks... worth it? Looks like I can get 5 quarts of oil for $30 at an automotive store.
Edit: While y'all are here, I have been experiencing rough idling and trouble starting the engine the first time after gassing up. Check engine light is on. Codes were P0171 I think and maybe P0403, but I'm not exactly sure. A couple months back it was accelerating poorly and I had to get my coil pack replaced. Some people say purge valve for this problem.
Don't buy oil at a auto parts store, it's sometime 50-75% more expensive than a big box store. Even if you don't buy oil from them, you can still refill the 5qt jug with used oil and take it back to Auto Zone or wherever to recycle for free.

You should be able to get oil + filter for around $30. Make sure it's the correct viscosity and meets Dexos spec (green icon on label). Also don't buy the cheapest fram oil filter you can get. Get the mid tier or premium. Better yet, just grab an ACDelco filter if they carry them.
 

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Source? Also, even if so, is that a problem?
You're eyes are your source.

It's a problem for me. I like Virgin oil. If you don't mind recycled. Knock yourself out.

P.S. I wouldn't recommend going the duration.

Seems like I recall something about it in class, also.
 

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You're eyes are your source.

It's a problem for me. I like Virgin oil. If you don't mind recycled. Knock yourself out.

P.S. I wouldn't recommend going the duration.
Supertech looks the exact same as pennzoil.
 
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You can always check for yourself here: dexos®

View attachment 288766
One nit on that. Motor oils can meet the certification spec, but not carry the cert. Sometimes the licensing fees are exorbitant, and the lube vendor skips the cost of paying extra to use the dexos logo (or some other cert logo) on their label, but still fully conforms to the dexos spec.

I'm not saying that's the case with the aforementioned Rotella, but I recall a case some years ago with another well known oil brand where they opted to forego a licensing fee, but clearly stated in the fine print they were fully in spec.

Doug

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One nit on that. Motor oils can meet the certification spec, but not carry the cert. Sometimes the licensing fees are exorbitant, and the lube vendor skips the cost of paying extra to use the dexos logo (or some other cert logo) on their label, but still fully conforms to the dexos spec.

I'm not saying that's the case with the aforementioned Rotella, but I recall a case some years ago with another well known oil brand where they opted to forego a licensing fee, but clearly stated in the fine print they were fully in spec.

Doug

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Yep, Amsoil isn't on the list...
 
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I can get at oil change at Chevrolet for $44 after taxes. That's with Valvoline full synthetic and ACdelco filter plus tire rotation.
 
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