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I live in SoCal--it doesn't get cold here, so we don't have winterized fuel (I believe)

That being said, I can drive up into the mountains here in just a couple of hours and it will be <30F. I go skiing and park it for a few hours so it gets cold.

How cold does it have to be before I add anti-gel to my fuel?
 

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Depends on whether you're buying bio or not. And where you're fueling up at. Keeping in mind that semi's also need diesel and the only direction they're going is either north or east.

If you're worried about it. $20 for insurance is a whole lot cheaper then a tow + repair bill.
 

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Buy a bottle of Power Service white bottle. If you're headed to the mountains, splash about 1/8 the bottle into the tank prior to departing and you'll be fine. 1/4 of the bottle if you feel like being extra safe. It's $2 of prevention that will give you peace of mind.
 

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The car also has a fuel heater in the fuel filter specifically to help prevent gelling and assist with water separation. But it can't hurt to have additives.

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2014 Cruze Diesel, 2007 Cobalt, 1981 Camaro Z28, 2017 Volt
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They have anti-gel in our diesel, but I'm not sure how much.

We had ours gel when the ambient got down to -16F once, with a windchill quite a bit below that. Took Diesel 911 and a daytime high of a whopping +4F to thaw it.
 

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According to Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winter_diesel_fuel

"Summer" #2 Diesel (2-D) has a Cold Filter Plug Point (CFPP) of -7C/20F
"Winter" #1 Diesel (1-D) has a CFPP of -40C/-40F

Adding No.1 fuel will lower the CFPP of No.2 fuel - adding 10% will lower the CFPP temperature by about 5 degrees C.

Additives work, however if you can find both fuels at the same location it may be easier to "mix" them to achieve the same result.
Or fill up in the colder region as the fuel will be mixed for the colder climate.
 
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Thanks. Just wondering if there were some concrete numbers on this
Absolutely none because you are blind to what you are pumping into your fuel tank.

Crude oil can be refined to different cloud points, gel points, and CFPP. If refineries don't make a fuel with low specs the distributors or points of retail sale can put in their own additives. But none of these things are made known to you when you are buying at the pump and it's rare to find a station where a clerk or manager on duty can tell you what is coming out of the pump nozzle.
 

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According to Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winter_diesel_fuel

"Summer" #2 Diesel (2-D) has a Cold Filter Plug Point (CFPP) of -7C/20F
"Winter" #1 Diesel (1-D) has a CFPP of -40C/-40F

Adding No.1 fuel will lower the CFPP of No.2 fuel - adding 10% will lower the CFPP temperature by about 5 degrees C.

Additives work, however if you can find both fuels at the same location it may be easier to "mix" them to achieve the same result.
Or fill up in the colder region as the fuel will be mixed for the colder climate.
Here in the USA we have no regulations requiring winter blending of fuel, just "suggestions" of what should be the specs. It's honestly rare to have a problem anywhere in the USA. Northern climates sell winter diesel with additives already in the fuel. Really cold locations (North Dakota, Montana, Minnesota, etc.) offer diesel #1 at some pumps. Truckers buying in warm locations (Florida) and then going north into winter know to fill their tanks as soon as they arrive in a winter location and to put additives in the fuel.
 

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According to Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winter_diesel_fuel

"Summer" #2 Diesel (2-D) has a Cold Filter Plug Point (CFPP) of -7C/20F
"Winter" #1 Diesel (1-D) has a CFPP of -40C/-40F

Adding No.1 fuel will lower the CFPP of No.2 fuel - adding 10% will lower the CFPP temperature by about 5 degrees C.

Additives work, however if you can find both fuels at the same location it may be easier to "mix" them to achieve the same result.
Or fill up in the colder region as the fuel will be mixed for the colder climate.
Here in the USA we have no regulations requiring winter blending of fuel, just "suggestions" of what should be the specs. It's honestly rare to have a problem anywhere in the USA. Northern climates sell winter diesel with additives already in the fuel. Really cold locations (North Dakota, Montana, Minnesota, etc.) offer diesel #1 at some pumps. Truckers buying in warm locations (Florida) and then going north into winter know to fill their tanks as soon as they arrive in a winter location and to put additives in the fuel.
I was merely paraphrasing what wikipedia stated. There are numerous blends of diesel fuels and additives sold that change the temperature characteristics of the fuel and rarely is there any ratings or info listed.

It would appear at worst any diesel fuel can handle 20F/-7C before one has to worry about gelling.

I have never personally seen #1 or #2 listed on any diesel pump in Canada. It's just ultra low sulfur diesel ULSD. Sometimes contains up to B10 or B20. No cetane rating or temperature range usually either.

I have never had a gelling problem even at -40C here in central Canada.

I have seen #1 and #2 diesel listed at some US pumps in the past. Most however, just sell the blended flavor of the month.
 

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I have never personally seen #1 or #2 listed on any diesel pump in Canada. It's just ultra low sulfur diesel ULSD. Sometimes contains up to B10 or B20. No cetane rating or temperature range usually either.
I've never traveled through or lived in Canada but given the climate there I imagine fuel sales are serious about anti-gel additives blended in the fuel. They just do it so no one has a problem.
 

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Here in the USA we have no regulations requiring winter blending of fuel, just "suggestions" of what should be the specs. It's honestly rare to have a problem anywhere in the USA. Northern climates sell winter diesel with additives already in the fuel. Really cold locations (North Dakota, Montana, Minnesota, etc.) offer diesel #1 at some pumps. Truckers buying in warm locations (Florida) and then going north into winter know to fill their tanks as soon as they arrive in a winter location and to put additives in the fuel.
federal and state regs follow astm 975 standards, within those standards are requirements to to meet the 10th percentile minimum ambient temperature map provided.
 

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I was merely paraphrasing what wikipedia stated. There are numerous blends of diesel fuels and additives sold that change the temperature characteristics of the fuel and rarely is there any ratings or info listed.

It would appear at worst any diesel fuel can handle 20F/-7C before one has to worry about gelling.

I have never personally seen #1 or #2 listed on any diesel pump in Canada. It's just ultra low sulfur diesel ULSD. Sometimes contains up to B10 or B20. No cetane rating or temperature range usually either.

I have never had a gelling problem even at -40C here in central Canada.

I have seen #1 and #2 diesel listed at some US pumps in the past. Most however, just sell the blended flavor of the month.
two truckstops in chilliwack bc (just outside of vancouver) are the the only #1 and #2 pumps ive seen in canada, they were in the truck lane, i didnt have a diesel car when i fueled there, so i dunno what the car pumps have for choice
 

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I have never had a gelling problem even at -40C here in central Canada.
one time in toonytown, the esso, the husky and the petro were all frozen, the pumps wouldnt work, was -51 and my reefer was having troubles running

drove the hour or so to n battleford, was much warmer, reefer ran fine, and was able to fuel up.
 

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one time in toonytown, the esso, the husky and the petro were all frozen, the pumps wouldnt work, was -51 and my reefer was having troubles running

drove the hour or so to n battleford, was much warmer, reefer ran fine, and was able to fuel up.
Yeah I could see there being a problem at -51!

In the summer on my travels down to the US I will definitely keep my eye out for #2 diesel pumps as it supposedly does get better fuel mileage.
 

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federal and state regs follow astm 975 standards, within those standards are requirements to to meet the 10th percentile minimum ambient temperature map provided.
There are no federal regulations regarding winter diesel fuel. States can set standards.

ASTM D-975 does not specify any winter diesel requirements. The cloud point stuff in that standard is a suggestion only, not a requirement.
 
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