Chevrolet Cruze Forums banner
81 - 100 of 119 Posts

·
Administrator
2014 LT program car, Pull Me Over Red, 1.4T Auto
Joined
·
13,245 Posts
I have been working on an alternate method for changing the ATF on this car for a while, and believe I have most of the creases ironed out. This thread will serve to discuss the procedure being outlined and provide assistance with any steps that still need to be discussed.
Andrei,

As you know I am looking at changing my AT fluid and was wondering if this project is on hold permanently or just one of a long list of projects. There is quite a lot of info here, but it seems that there are a few more items not yet documented based on the red ink. Also is there a link or something for the Torque app?


Robert
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
15,844 Posts
Discussion Starter · #82 ·
Andrei,

As you know I am looking at changing my AT fluid and was wondering if this project is on hold permanently or just one of a long list of projects. There is quite a lot of info here, but it seems that there are a few more items not yet documented based on the red ink. Also is there a link or something for the Torque app?


Robert
I wrote this up as a general guide for people. My Cruze is a manual so it doesn't apply to me.

There seem to be two different obd2 adapter types and some apparently won't read the trans temp? It confused me but apparently it doesn't work for some people, which is annoying.

Sent from my STV100-1 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
325 Posts
Well, I just did a "quick" trans fluid drain/fill last Thursday at work. I wasn't really comfortable with removing the trans cooler lines so I thought I'd drain, measure, fill the trans. I was mindful of getting it up to operating temp, and having a level car when filling/checking. Used AC Delco Dexron 6.

All was cool going home Thursday. To and from work Friday no issues. Didn't drive it Saturday or Sunday. Today going to work was fine. On the way home today, stopped somewhere, got back into the car and started it up and got the following:

Text Yellow Font Technology


Appears all those codes have to do with the trans, so when I got home, the trans was up to temp, car level, and I removed the check plug. No fluid coming out :banghead:
Seems I am low, but my extra fluid is at work. I'll have to go in early to fill it.

I don't know how it could be low. When I checked it originally, the trans was up to operating temp, the car was level and fluid was coming out of the check plug. I assumed it was full and that was the end of it.

I see no other leaks.

I just hope I didn't bork the trans. :(

It runs and shifts fine, it just threw me for a loop when those messages and codes popped up :eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,383 Posts
MikeStony-

I think you have an issue non transmission related. I really think your facing an electrical issue. Possibly the negative battery cable from the battery to the frame point near the radiator support.

The gauges jumping in the video, the transmission code might be a result of low voltage, or voltage spiking rather than your fluid level.

Granted I'd still top it up, but I doubt those issues will go away.

Google Cruze Stibilitrak and Steering. I think it's this negative cable. You can try to measure voltage drop with the car running. It should be really low with a good cable.

If you have jumper cables, you could connect one from the negative to the frame ground and see if that cures everything. Be careful when doing this.

The negative cable does have an extended dealer warranty on it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: mikestony

·
Registered
Joined
·
325 Posts
MikeStony-

I think you have an issue non transmission related. I really think your facing an electrical issue. Possibly the negative battery cable from the battery to the frame point near the radiator support.

The gauges jumping in the video, the transmission code might be a result of low voltage, or voltage spiking rather than your fluid level.

Granted I'd still top it up, but I doubt those issues will go away.

Google Cruze Stibilitrak and Steering. I think it's this negative cable. You can try to measure voltage drop with the car running. It should be really low with a good cable.

If you have jumper cables, you could connect one from the negative to the frame ground and see if that cures everything. Be careful when doing this.

The negative cable does have an extended dealer warranty on it.
Ah, thanks, good thinking!
Well, here's the thing; I replaced the negative cable just before winter, and also added another (homemade from welding cable) cable from the engine to the same ground by the radiator support.
Unless they came loose (now you got me thinking lol) :)
I'm going to check those now!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
325 Posts
Ah, thanks, good thinking!
Well, here's the thing; I replaced the negative cable just before winter, and also added another (homemade from welding cable) cable from the engine to the same ground by the radiator support.
Unless they came loose (now you got me thinking lol) :)
I'm going to check those now!
4-22-2017
update.
After tightening the grounds (not very loose but got a slight tweak out of them) and checking the fluid level the next day (only added about a cup lol, not much at all) I've had no more issues or codes thrown at me. :)
Perhaps my trans is finicky about the exact level being correct...dunno.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Just wondering if anyone else has tried out BusDriver's method for flushing the transmission? I'm getting ready to flush mine and wanted to see how this method worked for other people.


First off, let me preface here. I am not recommending anybody perform the experimentation that I have with this transmission. With that said,curiosity got the best of me.

I came at this project a little differently than most. This car was purchased as a 42,000 mile total that had been partially repaired. As a result of a recent drive axle replacement, I had already experienced some fluid loss of about ¾ qt. After replacing a right axle, strut (bent), strut mount/bearing (nubs worn) and lower control arm (bent) I chose to drive the car in a known low fluid state just to see how the transmission would perform. I was extremely cautious at first and then incrementally changed to more normal driving conditions. In the 100 miles that I put on the car in this condition I witnessed only two unusual transmission behaviors. Both were under harder than average driving conditions and very similar in nature. Although I never attempted any wide open throttle testing, I did find that turning at a higher than normal “G”and a panic stop were the conditions causing the only issues that I experienced with fluid level at a known low. Both times the transmission felt like it came out of gear briefly, and then reengaged. My speculation is that the pump cavitated due to loss of fluid at the pickup. Each incident lasted less than 1 second. Other than those two issues I saw nothing else. No slippage, normal shift points, good lockup and no codes.


For me, the transmission return line was by far the easiest way to change the fluid. I chose not to drain the pan, but rather use the return line access for the entire flush. I used a floor jack to remove the tire, and then lowered the car to its non-lifted level, measured at fender height, to perform the flush. Since I started out about ¾ of a qt low prior to the flush, I added fluid first. Once the wheel was removed the return line attaching point almost jumped out of the car and gave me a kiss, it was that easy. The line is secured with a 13mm nut. The line has about 3/8 to ½ inch of straight pipe before it is flared for the O-ring sealing surface making it easy to clamp some clear hose using a worm clamp to keep the job spill free. I did not take a picture, however the return connection can be seen through the spokes on an 18” LTZ rim. It is right below the point where the flexible brake line mounts to the frame. The fender liner does not need to be removed to gain access. Since I captured all of the fluid back in the qt containers that were just added to the transmission, I knew the amount removed and added throughout the flush. After the flush, when it came time to set the fluid level; I started the car, cycled through the forward and reverse gears briefly then left the car running in drive until the transmission warmed which took some time. It never did get to a temperature that has been suggested as the proper temp to check fluid level. After shifting to park, leaving the car running I removed the fluid level plug adding fluid until the level just reached the sight hole. Then I lowered the floor jack slightly to allow about an ounce or two of additional fluid to drain out of the hole and onto a wad of paper towels to compensate for the low trans temp.


My fill technique was far from scientific, or even approved, yet I suspect it is pretty close. If someone knew how much the volume of fluid increased in this transmission from around 70 degrees to a normal checking temp we could make this more accurate.


I performed the flush flying solo. This was much less messy and time consuming than I anticipated.

I have gleaned enough useful information from this forum that I chose to add a picture.


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
After i bought my Cruze. İn order to flash transmission, my mechanic guy has changed the fluid twice. And we used mannol atf. But he didnt measure the outcoming fluid and put 4 litres of mannol. Since we dont have a stick to measure the atf fluid. İs the 4 litre enough?

Redmi Pro cihazımdan Tapatalk kullanılarak gönderildi
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Transmission Flush Complete!

So I performed my transmission flush this past weekend and just wanted to post my process and any information that could possibly help someone in the future.

I started by first figuring out which method I wanted to use. I decided to use BusDriver's method in this thread and perform a flush by disconnecting the cooler return line from the rear of the transmission behind the driver side wheel.

You can see in the first pic below (taken by BusDriver in his post), when you take the driver side wheel off, the return line connection is basically jumping right at you.

Auto part


Because I wanted to easily and accurately measure the fluid that was coming out, I purchased one of these from Amazon. Since our transmission holds about 9 quarts of fluid, this container was plenty to catch everything.

Now that I had my line picked out, catch container picked out, all I had left to do was to figure out an accurate way of measuring the trans fluid temp, and find the correct tube to attach to the trans cooler line.

Based on the advice from Andrei (XtremeRevolution), I purchased one of these bluetooth OBDII adapters as well as the Torque App to measure my trans temp since correct fluid level is dependent on accurately knowing your trans fluid temp. This thing is awesome by the way, and one of the best things I've bought for my car.

Finally, it was time to decide what size tubing to use. Based on the design of the trans return line, I wanted to get my tubing over the flare that is on the tube, so that I can use a hose clamp after the flare to hold the tube onto the line. I found 5/8" I.D. clear plastic tubing to work best (see pics below)


Now that I had everything prepared, I was ready to begin my flush. I started by removing the driver side tire and leveling the front of the car so it was completely level. I also made sure that I was able to crack loose the level plug for later.

Next I loosened the 13mm nut holding the cooler line retaining block to the transmission and pulled the cooler line out of the rear of the transmission. *Note, it was a little tough to remove the line. I found pulling the line back and towards the left (driver side) helped get it out.* It's also worth noting that almost no fluid came out when I pulled the line out (which was something I was worried about.)

Now I slipped my clear tube over the trans line (see below) and secured it with the hose clamp. The hose clamp was a 1" clamp I believe.
Fuel line Auto part Pipe


Next, I had my ran my tube into my quart container and got my 10 quarts of Amsoil transmission fluid ready to pour.

Automotive exterior Bumper Auto part Gas


I inserted my long neck funnel into the top fill port of the transmission and had my helper start the engine. The fluid started coming out immediately in the clear tube and into my container. The fluid was black as sin because of the anti-corrosion agent GM put in.

I began to pour immediately and tried to keep up with the transmission. The fluid came out a little fast until the engine idle rpm normalized. Once at a normal idle, the fluid came out at about a quart every 10 seconds. Definitely easy enough to keep up with pouring.

After about 8 quarts, the fluid was starting to come out clear, and after the 9th quart, the fluid was nice and clear so I had my helper shut the engine. I finished pouring the last drops of the 9th quart and then removed the clear tube and began to re-attach the cooler line to the transmission.

It's also worth mentioning that I bought a replacement o-ring for the trans cooler line where the flare seats onto the transmission case. It's so cheap that I figured why not.

The whole flush process took about 90 seconds, and I couldn't believe how easily it went.

Finally it came time to check the level. Per Andrei's instructions in this thread, the fluid must be between 85C - 95C before pulling the level plug. To accomplish this, I put my foot down hard on the brake (still with the tire removed and up on the jack stands) and first cycled through all the gears two or three times to get any air out.

Please make sure your car is securely jacked up and back wheels locked and chocked as shifting through gears makes the car shake a bit.

After cycling the gears, I shifted my trans into M3 and began power braking while keeping an eye on the temp with the torque app.

I tried to keep it between 2000-2500 RPM and I'd say it took about 3 minutes to reach 90C (195F). Once I hit 90C, I let off the gas and let the car idle. I quickly removed the plug and a bit of fluid came out. Be prepared to have a towel ready and some gloves since the fluid will be literally almost 200 degrees. Removing the bottom splash shield will allow you to easier catch what comes out. I should've but didn't and now have a nice stain on my driveway...
:yahoo:

After letting about 1/4 of a quart out, the fluid began to extremely slowly dribble out.

I made sure the car was still at the right temp and reinstalled the fill plug to complete the job.

I performed my flush at 34,000 miles because I am tuned and firmly believe in preventative maintenance. I know it may have been a bit early, but I just bought out the car from a lease and I wanted to get some high quality fluid into the transmission asap.

The car shifts much smoother. It already shifts extremely fast from the BNR tune, but now with fresh fluid, I sometimes can't even feel it shifting it's so quick and smooth. I'm very happy I performed the flush and definitely recommend it for keeping your transmission happy.

Good luck everyone!
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,383 Posts
The transmission filter deep inside the transmission and requires you to slit the two halfs of the transmission apart. This requires removal of the transmission.
So really it's not replaceable like the older GM 4T60 4T65's that you might be familar with.

There's a drain plug in the pan on the cruze. No one's pulling the pan. Actually I don't think there's a pan. The drain plug is literally tapped right into the bottom of the case.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
248 Posts
sounds good.. I think i will do the diy flush as listed above.

Surprised you have to do this while hot though.. I assume the level plug is calibrated to be full when hot.. Is that the only reason?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
248 Posts
I have just done the flush/refill using the above method. Things I found.

1) I bought a white plastic trash can for about $3 from the local Bi-Mart. Even though its white it was easy to see the fluid through and was cheap. I calibrated it by pouring water into it the night before and marking the outside with a sharpie.

2) I used a 3/8ths clear tygon tube (its what I had) . This was too marrow to go over the swage on the steel pipe so I simply hose clamped it to the end of the tube.. It didn't slip off as there is almost zero pressure there.

3) I HATED the power braking deal (mechanical sympathy) so I took it for a drive while being about half a quart overfilled.. I have a long hill and could not get the fluid up to temp even with braking plus power plus hill... Of course i also had the cooling effect of the tranny cooler at speed. I managed to overheat the brakes!...:(

4) I didn't remove any tires.. I just jacked the front (and rear) off the ground and used axle stands of course. Turning the steering gave me adequate access to the tube and the level plug.


I brought it back to the shop and finally got it up to 80 degC and called it good. The level plug is out while I'm writing this and doing the final drips while it cools down.

Why the heck they didn't set the level plug slightly lower to calibrate when cold is beyond me.... I hate abusing my brakes like that!

Even with the 1/2 quart overfilled the shifts are smoother than they were.

Next time I might do this on a 100F day to get the tranny fluid temp up without so much abuse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
248 Posts
I was wondering how important it was to get the transmission fully up to temperature as I could only get mine to 80 degC before changing the fluid.

So I looked up the volumetric thermal expansion coefficient and it turns out almost all light oils are around 0.0007 1/C. So If you didn't heat your transmission fluid at all (assume 15 degC) then how much will it expand when it is at 90C

well (90-15)*8ts*0.0007 = 0.42 quarts... I.e quite bit.

Ok so I got mine to 80deg C.. how much further expansion would I have got by going to 90 deg C?

(90-80)*8*0.0007 = 0.056 quarts or about 1.8 fluid ounces.

Conclusion.. As long as you get the transmission reasonably warm the volumetric difference is very small and not worth worrying about.

If my Tranny blows up you will conclude the engineer is not always right..:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
For those of you that choose to not begin by draining the transmission, you will never achieve a true flush. You need to drain the transmission and refill before beginning the flush so that only fresh fluid is pumped through the system.

Also, don't run your transmission empty as I saw one member suggest!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
This is how I have done them for years. Remove the top trans. line going into the cooler. Install a long hose on it. Put the end of it into a five gallon bucket. Start the car and let it squirt out into the bucket. As soon as it stops flowing shut off the car. Go underneath and remove the drain plug as you may get a bit more fluid out of it. Measure what came out and put that much back in. Always make the final check of the level with the trans warm, and the engine running.
 
81 - 100 of 119 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top