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The problem with the Cruze transmission rough shifting is a simple fix. This is an excellent post BUT the problem is described in the post.

The transmission "fill level plug" is NOT in the correct location, and the transmissions do NOT have enough fluid pressure in them causing rough shifting. I'm 4 quarts filled above that fill level plug, and mine now shifts smooth and soft like the touch of a feather when it was jerking all over the place like a chicken running around with its head cut off. Also, the transmission pressure solenoid gets worked too hard because it doesn't have enough fluid in them causing them to overheat and stick with additional rough shifting.

There is nothing wrong with the transmissions except they don't have enough fluid in them. Fill them up, and you notice a BIG difference. Add 1 quart of Dextron-VI at a time until it feels right, and you're satisfied.

Also, the reverse test is a good indicator. Reverse takes more pressure to engage. If you're on an incline, you'll notice the slip before it engages into reverse unless you're placing your foot on the brake and gas to pressure the transmission up first. The more fluid you have in the transmission the more pressure you will have to engage reverse. The transmission should engage immediately into gear. When it does that in reverse, on an incline, then your transmission is full. The rough shifting and jerking should go away or smooth out.

Tips and tricks when for the engineers put the fill level plug in the wrong place and too low, fill them up more.
9d382f1e-6068-46c4-a20a-106db277e141_0.gif
 

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The problem with the Cruze transmission rough shifting is a simple fix. This is an excellent post BUT the problem is described in the post.

The transmission "fill level plug" is NOT in the correct location, and the transmissions do NOT have enough fluid pressure in them causing rough shifting. I'm 4 quarts filled above that fill level plug, and mine now shifts smooth and soft like the touch of a feather when it was jerking all over the place like a chicken running around with its head cut off. Also, the transmission pressure solenoid gets worked too hard because it doesn't have enough fluid in them causing them to overheat and stick with additional rough shifting.

There is nothing wrong with the transmissions except they don't have enough fluid in them. Fill them up, and you notice a BIG difference. Add 1 quart of Dextron-VI at a time until it feels right, and you're satisfied.

Also, the reverse test is a good indicator. Reverse takes more pressure to engage. If you're on an incline, you'll notice the slip before it engages into reverse unless you're placing your foot on the brake and gas to pressure the transmission up first. The more fluid you have in the transmission the more pressure you will have to engage reverse. The transmission should engage immediately into gear. When it does that in reverse, on an incline, then your transmission is full. The rough shifting and jerking should go away or smooth out.

Tips and tricks when for the engineers put the fill level plug in the wrong place and too low, fill them up more.
View attachment 264861

???? Are you completely sure about that? Too much/overfill of fluid will lead to foaming. Everywhere I've read, including the procedure from GM states that you should not overfill the trans.
Your recommendation of "filling it until it feels right" is a bit unnerving especially when it comes to the transmission.

How did you come about this recommendation?
 

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???? Are you completely sure about that? Too much/overfill of fluid will lead to foaming. Everywhere I've read, including the procedure from GM states that you should not overfill the trans.
Your recommendation of "filling it until it feels right" is a bit unnerving especially when it comes to the transmission.

How did you come about this recommendation?
Excellent questions, and Yes, "too much overfill will lead to foaming. That's why I said, " add 1 quart at a time until you're satisfied." I added a 5th quart yesterday and didn't need too, but on the 5th quart, it foamed and the transmission heat warning light came on. I would say 4 quarts overfill is the extreme max before foaming occurs. I was testing the scenario out. 3 1/2 quarts overfill shifts smoothly, and so does 4, but 3 quarts is probably the ideal overfill amount for that transmission without foaming to have a smooth shift.

I came to the discussion last week with a transmission expert, who is also a mechanic friend of mine for 30 years. They're the best in the Southeast, I'd say, and taught me everything I know. We got to talking about the problem, and in the discussion, we addressed shift pressures too, and then he said, "you know, you may not have enough fluid in there?" And I said "too much, or not enough? And he replied, "not enough" You can overfill it in a safe zone before it foams, and smooth out your shift because the pressure is there needs that fluid for a smooth shift to engage. He said, "You have to find the overfill safe zone." So I worked on it all week, 1 quart at a time until the limit was reached yesterday above 4 quarts, and 4 is pushing it. Technically, I road all day on 5, but I am taking the 5th quart back out today. It wasn't until I got on it hard on the way home did it foam with extreme heat, in the extreme heat too.

At 3 quarts above level fill plug, I was already shifting extremely smooth, without problems, but I wanted to see how far it could be overfilled, max levels under hard conditions. I would say now 4 is upper-level max depending on how you filled the transmission. 3 quarts overfill max to be safe, if your shift is smooth, and it should be at that point. Fully tested this week. It took 5th-quart overfill, and all day riding, engine left running and then riding hard for the warning to finally come on after the 4th quart. Cruse transmissions have heat sensor in them, and the computer will tell you when the transmission is overheating. I triggered that sensor, finally, yesterday in the overfill max limits test. I got seven codes just from overfill yesterday, c0800; U0101; p0634; p0634; p0990; p0171; p0700; p0496, and I cleared them all knowing the problems came from computer safety precautions to save the car. It went into limp mode because I couldn't pull over to let the engine idle as the computer instructed me too on transmission overheat on the 5th quart. I was on the interstate in heavy traffic. I will resolve the issue today with removing the 5th quart, and take it back down to 3 1/2 quarts overfill since that's the ideal range I have determined for my car to be smooth shifting, satisfied, and completely safe.

In fact, when I pulled my level fill plug, that factory had at least 1 1/2 quarts above the level fill line. I knew then that they knew too. Go figure.

That's how. I work on cars too, but I don't tell anyone because they ask too many questions.

I've had this Cruze since it came off the truck new, and the transmissions never been smoother than this week. I have 63,500 miles on my 2012. GM built a fine car. My transmission is fine now except for my sticky solenoid when it first engages either in reverse or drive. I can deal with that, for now.

I hope this helps you.

Btw, I think Autozone has a sale on Dextron-VI right now.
2 for $10.00. If you want a smooth shift, drop a couple quarts in.
 

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Excellent questions, and Yes, "too much overfill will lead to foaming. That's why I said, " add 1 quart at a time until you're satisfied." I added a 5th quart yesterday and didn't need too, but on the 5th quart, it foamed and the transmission heat warning light came on. I would say 4 quarts overfill is the extreme max before foaming occurs. I was testing the scenario out. 3 1/2 quarts overfill shifts smoothly, and so does 4, but 3 quarts is probably the ideal overfill amount for that transmission without foaming to have a smooth shift.

I came to the discussion last week with a transmission expert, who is also a mechanic friend of mine for 30 years. They're the best in the Southeast, I'd say, and taught me everything I know. We got to talking about the problem, and in the discussion, we addressed shift pressures too, and then he said, "you know, you may not have enough fluid in there?" And I said "too much, or not enough? And he replied, "not enough" You can overfill it in a safe zone before it foams, and smooth out your shift because the pressure is there needs that fluid for a smooth shift to engage. He said, "You have to find the overfill safe zone." So I worked on it all week, 1 quart at a time until the limit was reached yesterday above 4 quarts, and 4 is pushing it. Technically, I road all day on 5, but I am taking the 5th quart back out today. It wasn't until I got on it hard on the way home did it foam with extreme heat, in the extreme heat too.

At 3 quarts above level fill plug, I was already shifting extremely smooth, without problems, but I wanted to see how far it could be overfilled, max levels under hard conditions. I would say now 4 is upper-level max depending on how you filled the transmission. 3 quarts overfill max to be safe, if your shift is smooth, and it should be at that point. Fully tested this week. It took 5th-quart overfill, and all day riding, engine left running and then riding hard for the warning to finally come on after the 4th quart. Cruse transmissions have heat sensor in them, and the computer will tell you when the transmission is overheating. I triggered that sensor, finally, yesterday in the overfill max limits test. I got seven codes just from overfill yesterday, c0800; U0101; p0634; p0634; p0990; p0171; p0700; p0496, and I cleared them all knowing the problems came from computer safety precautions to save the car. It went into limp mode because I couldn't pull over to let the engine idle as the computer instructed me too on transmission overheat on the 5th quart. I was on the interstate in heavy traffic. I will resolve the issue today with removing the 5th quart, and take it back down to 3 1/2 quarts overfill since that's the ideal range I have determined for my car to be smooth shifting, satisfied, and completely safe.

In fact, when I pulled my level fill plug, that factory had at least 1 1/2 quarts above the level fill line. I knew then that they knew too. Go figure.

That's how. I work on cars too, but I don't tell anyone because they ask too many questions.

I've had this Cruze since it came off the truck new, and the transmissions never been smoother than this week. I have 63,500 miles on my 2012. GM built a fine car. My transmission is fine now except for my sticky solenoid when it first engages either in reverse or drive. I can deal with that, for now.

I hope this helps you.

Btw, I think Autozone has a sale on Dextron-VI right now.
2 for $10.00. If you want a smooth shift, drop a couple quarts in.
How are things holding up?
 

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I was wondering how important it was to get the transmission fully up to temperature as I could only get mine to 80 degC before changing the fluid.

So I looked up the volumetric thermal expansion coefficient and it turns out almost all light oils are around 0.0007 1/C. So If you didn't heat your transmission fluid at all (assume 15 degC) then how much will it expand when it is at 90C

well (90-15)*8ts*0.0007 = 0.42 quarts... I.e quite bit.

Ok so I got mine to 80deg C.. how much further expansion would I have got by going to 90 deg C?

(90-80)*8*0.0007 = 0.056 quarts or about 1.8 fluid ounces.

Conclusion.. As long as you get the transmission reasonably warm the volumetric difference is very small and not worth worrying about.

If my Tranny blows up you will conclude the engineer is not always right..:)
You're very wrong. First off the space matters. Oil expansion will rise faster in say a 16oz bottle vs a 2litres. They may expand the same amount but the size will put them at different levels in the bottle. 2nd while the car is under 140 degrees (tft) the thermal valve that controls oil flow and level is open and is located in the valve body and allows oil to flow from the body to the sump freely. After 140 degrees is reached the valve closes and traps the oil in the valve body where it will rise from expansion... overflow will be put back into the sump or pushed out of the vent cap.
 

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You're very wrong. First off the space matters. Oil expansion will rise faster in say a 16oz bottle vs a 2litres. They may expand the same amount but the size will put them at different levels in the bottle. 2nd while the car is under 140 degrees (tft) the thermal valve that controls oil flow and level is open and is located in the valve body and allows oil to flow from the body to the sump freely. After 140 degrees is reached the valve closes and traps the oil in the valve body where it will rise from expansion... overflow will be put back into the sump or pushed out of the vent cap.
Nice explanation. I would use the terms "oil level" instead of "oil expansion" though as the rate of expansion doesn't change, just the rate the level changes does.
 

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Well if you have a way to actually get the transmission up to temp I'd love to hear it but I ran it up a steep hill for several miles even applying the brakes and could not get it above 80C and that was on a fairly warm day. I have done a further 50,000 miles since I changed the fluid and so far no problems.
 

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Note the poster above is talking about overfilling by up to 3 QUARTS as being in the "safe zone".. I'm talking about 1.8 fluid ounces... I personally wouldn't be overfilling by quarts but I seriously doubt say 2 egg-cupfuls is an issue... I maybe wrong of course I don't have actual correlative data showing transmission failure rates vs transmission overfill quantities so sure overfilling by 1.8 fluid ounces is a risk, but honestly if engineers are expecting busy shops to get the fill quantity spot on at exactly the right temperature they are dreaming. No way is a dealer mechanic going spend hours getting it exactly right, they would never make any money..:)
 

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Well if you have a way to actually get the transmission up to temp I'd love to hear it but I ran it up a steep hill for several miles even applying the brakes and could not get it above 80C and that was on a fairly warm day. I have done a further 50,000 miles since I changed the fluid and so far no problems.

Idk, I can get mine up there and its 50 degrees out lol.
 

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Idk, I can get mine up there and its 50 degrees out lol.
Yeah I am struggling with it too, 70 out today (waited on it to warm up and still can't crack 80C...)
285510
 

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You need to rev it up with the brakes applied - while the wheels are off the ground.
Sounds terrible. But if it must be done. I have a feeling I’m overfilled and need to find out for sure. Question why off the ground?
 

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Sounds terrible. But if it must be done. I have a feeling I’m overfilled and need to find out for sure. Question why off the ground?
¯\(ツ)

Well, how are you going to get under it to do anything. It also needs to be level.
 

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Flushed my transmission for the 2nd time at 75k miles today... 2014 LT. Been staying on top of maintenance and fixed most of the weak spots on the cruze. Car is running great... it was 70 degrees out and had no problems hitting some hills hard and then driving loops in 2nd gear till trans temp hit 200. Let it cool down to 190 and about 12 ounces came out. It sure has been a journey keeping this car leak free, but I love this car lol
Screenshot_20200318-122135_Torque.jpg
Screenshot_20200318-174923_Torque.jpg
 
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